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posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday July 10 2019, @02:44PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the future-looks-bright dept.

Following Canonical's pivot away from its internally-developed Unity user interface and Mir display server, Ubuntu has enjoyed two relatively low-drama years, as the Linux Desktop market homogenized during its transition back to a customized GNOME desktop. In a review of the most recent release, TechRepublic's Jack Wallen declared that "Ubuntu 19.04 should seriously impress anyone looking for a fast and reliable Linux desktop platform."

Largely, it's been a slow-and-steady pace for Ubuntu since the pivot from Unity to GNOME, though the distribution made headlines for plans to end support for 32-bit support. This prompted Valve, operators of games marketplace Steam, to re-think its approach toward Ubuntu, which it previously characterized as "as the best-supported path for desktop users."

TechRepublic's James Sanders interviewed Will Cooke, director of engineering for Ubuntu Desktop at Canonical, about the distribution's long-term plans for legacy 32-bit support, shipping a desktop in a post-Unity-era Ubuntu, and why Linux should be the first choice for users migrating from Windows 7 prior to the end of support.

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/ubuntu-what-does-the-future-look-like-post-unity/


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  • (Score: 2) by ikanreed on Wednesday July 10 2019, @02:57PM (13 children)

    by ikanreed (3164) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @02:57PM (#865389) Journal

    Not support hardware that hasn't been seriously manufactured for 15 years!

    My god!

    • (Score: 5, Informative) by Pino P on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:06PM (10 children)

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:06PM (#865397) Journal

      It's not only that Canonical wanted to stop shipping a 32-bit kernel. Canonical also wanted to stop shipping the 32-bit system libraries that allow a 32-bit user application to run on a 64-bit kernel. This would have broken 32-bit applications in Wine and 32-bit games downloaded through Steam. When Apple dropped support for 32-bit user processes in macOS Catalina (10.15), it led to the nickname "Catalina Wine Killer".

      • (Score: 2) by PiMuNu on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:28PM (2 children)

        by PiMuNu (3823) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:28PM (#865403)

        IIRC graphics cards are mostly 32 bit? Is that Valve's beef?

        • (Score: 2) by ikanreed on Wednesday July 10 2019, @04:17PM (1 child)

          by ikanreed (3164) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @04:17PM (#865416) Journal

          Presumably Valve's beef is that they put a "Linux compatible" sticker on some games in their store, and they'd have to review and update that sticker for games built on 32 bit technology.

          And valve is super allergic to doing any kind of actual work to actually maintain or support their multibillion dollar free income stream.

          • (Score: 3, Touché) by Pino P on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:47PM

            by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:47PM (#865490) Journal

            It's not only that Valve is allergic to doing work. It's also that developers publishing through Valve's Steam platform are allergic to doing work. Some aren't even in business anymore.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:30PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @03:30PM (#865404)

        32 bit is going to the graveyard.

      • (Score: 1) by fustakrakich on Wednesday July 10 2019, @05:18PM (1 child)

        by fustakrakich (6150) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @05:18PM (#865432) Journal

        So much for Ubuntu, I mean, really, what do they offer? But is this a real problem [pkgs.org]? Just asking for a friend...

        --
        Ok, we paid the ransom. Do I get my dog back? REDЯUM
        • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:50PM

          by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:50PM (#865492) Journal

          It's a real problem if a proprietary application's developer either A. is no longer in business or B. considers a 64-bit build to be an upsell in order to get customers to re-buy its product.

      • (Score: 2) by melikamp on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:48PM (3 children)

        by melikamp (1886) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:48PM (#865491) Journal

        I am not saying you are wrong about anything, but.... FUCK NONFREE GAMES OMG, ДОКОЛЕ???? Is this really what is holding up teh progress... SAD.

        • (Score: 2) by Pino P on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:52PM (2 children)

          by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:52PM (#865493) Journal

          Let me know when there's a viable business model for producing a video game with AAA production values with the intent of distributing it under a free software license from day one.

          • (Score: 3, Insightful) by melikamp on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:07PM (1 child)

            by melikamp (1886) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:07PM (#865499) Journal
            I am SERIOUSLY don't even know what you are talking about. I played games since Paratrooper [wikipedia.org], and so I would like to think I have some perspective as well as taste, and these days I play Xonotic & Minetest mostly, because they are absolutely amazing in terms of gameplay, and I get to contribute to the god-damn codebase/support at will, making them even better. This "business model" you are talking about is a monstrosity created/enabled by the copyright law. If copyright law (which, imho, is deeply immoral, and is objectively at war with the free market) is removed from consideration, then nothing you say makes any sense, which is where we need to be heading.
            • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @10:13PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @10:13PM (#865530)

              Huh. Well, I'll bite in AC mode.

              The question is: How will people make money at game development without copyright law.
              Your predicted answer: WHAT? Why should they? Why can't games just be developed for FREE?
              Reply: Because the economy, stupid. The same reason copyright came into being in the first place: Get better quality because of profit motive. Enable profit motive by allowing exclusive right of copy. Doing so produces higher overall quality than the free movement can generate, whether you like that or not.

              The "business model" is how people eat in a land where we can no longer produce enough to keep an economy growing because we chose to become rulers of the world by service and governance.

              You may not like the model. Fine. You are welcome to produce games for free and participate in communities who do. Fine and you're welcome to do so, as long as you don't tread on the toes of intellectual property! Ain't freedom grand? But there enough intelligent people who realize that there's enough of the economy tied up in having copyright in existence to say, "yeah, let's keep this old and antiquated system because I don't want to have to make a living by putting two rounds through your head and taking everything you have. Copyright might be a better existence than that."

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by eravnrekaree on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:21PM (1 child)

      by eravnrekaree (555) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:21PM (#865507)

      A big use for 32 bit images is in a VM on CPUs made as little as 3 years ago. Some recent CPUs lack hardware assisted VM support. On these CPUs, you can only run a 32 bit OS as a guest under a VM. There is also nothing really wrong with using 32 bit 15 year old hardware. In some developing country it may be all they can get. I thought we were supposed to be resourcesful and avoid creating too much e-waste? These practices of ubuntu encourage people to generate large amounts of e-waste when at a whim they decide to kill support for old hardware. Its stupid,. a lot of people dont have resources to go out and buy new hw whenever they decide to do this.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 12 2019, @07:07AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Friday July 12 2019, @07:07AM (#866141)

        Don't. Use. Ubuntu.

  • (Score: 2, Insightful) by fustakrakich on Wednesday July 10 2019, @05:05PM (5 children)

    by fustakrakich (6150) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @05:05PM (#865429) Journal

    And they still offer nothing more than the quiet, stable, and long lasting ones [slackware.com] do :-)

    --
    Ok, we paid the ransom. Do I get my dog back? REDЯUM
    • (Score: 2) by melikamp on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:54PM (2 children)

      by melikamp (1886) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:54PM (#865494) Journal
      As a (deblobbed) Slackware user, I can testify that the OS is in fact better than Ubuntu in virtually every way that I care about, however, there are things Ubuntu does that Salckware simply doesn't, and that serves a horde of users. My family & friends run Ubuntu & Debian (cuz that's what I install & support), and I have to say, KUbuntu is pretty fucking slick the last couple of years, in the sense that everything appears to just work (tm) and the user rage is at the minimum. I remember abandoning Ubuntu during its tumultuous yearly 2000s because it was a steaming pile of shit with crash frequency measurable in Hertz. This is simply no longer the case: whatever it was, they fixed it, and the OS is perfectly usable, with clear paths to deblob and/or stem the non-free software creep.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:26PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:26PM (#865513)

        What, specifically, are these unnamed "things"? Kernel panics and app SIGSEGVs I know, but they're not a positive feature. :)

      • (Score: 2) by Gaaark on Thursday July 11 2019, @12:53AM

        by Gaaark (41) on Thursday July 11 2019, @12:53AM (#865589) Journal

        I used to use and recommend Ubuntu, but then came feck around, feck around, feck around.

        Manjaro (Arch) has given me stability and rock solid performance.

        I'd love to see Ubuntu return to 'GREATNESS', but won't bet on it.

        Really would be nice.

        --
        --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Pino P on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:55PM (1 child)

      by Pino P (4721) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @08:55PM (#865495) Journal

      Historically, one major advantage of Ubuntu and other distributions based on it was better hardware autodetection and more defaults that "just work" during install for common classes of desktop and laptop computing tasks. About when did Slackware catch up in that respect?

      • (Score: 3, Informative) by melikamp on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:00PM

        by melikamp (1886) on Wednesday July 10 2019, @09:00PM (#865496) Journal

        Hardware detection is in the kernel now, but what you are saying is still an issue when it comes to user-friendliness. You can't really compare Ubuntu to Slackware in this area: I mean, for x-sake, Slackware still boots into command line on install, AND THAT'S TEH WAY WE LIKE IT, tyvm. Ubuntu, otoh, goes out of its way to set shit up so that the user doesn't have to, and it it really make a difference.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @10:05PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday July 10 2019, @10:05PM (#865526)

    reimagine wine so that it works completely transparently. in many cases the apps people depend on to get their work done are unmaintained, shitty, proprietary windows-only apps from 10+ years ago. make a hidden layer to allow those to runs flawlessly and many companies will switch and even pay to use linux. also, get unattended upgrades working 100% and allow it to be enabled in the gui. normals don't want to deal with OS stuff like updates.

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