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posted by martyb on Wednesday June 09, @03:23AM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the chips-und-wafer dept.

https://techcrunch.com/2021/06/07/bosch-opens-1-2-billion-chip-plant-in-germany/

Bosch, one of the worlds largest engineering companies, is trying to cash in on the global chip shortage by starting production in Germany, even though it's apparently mostly a wafer plant and they are sending those to Asia for packaging and assembly.

A large chunk of it is probably for their own needs as they make everything from power tools to medical equipment.

But why not just do the assembly in Germany to? This shipping things back and forth — isn't this one of the points of failure that has been experienced during COVID-19?


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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @03:48AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @03:48AM (#1143420)

    Shoes want to save money. That's all there is to it. There are no fucking reasons why packaging and assembly should not occur in the same plant as the wafer manufacture; and there are no fucking reasons other than Shoes losing money why wafer manufacture cannot happen domestically. Hell, ASML is a Dutch company.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:20AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:20AM (#1143458)

      "There are only two things I can't stand in this world: People who are intolerant of other people's cultures, and the Dutch."
            -- Nigel Powers (Austin's dad)

  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @03:50AM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @03:50AM (#1143421)

    I will never buy products from:

    VW
    Mitsbishi
    Krupp
    AT&T

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @05:02AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @05:02AM (#1143437)

      Relevance?

    • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:11AM (3 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:11AM (#1143457)

      Krupp

      Quick question: How do you plan to install your next escalator? [Asking for a friend who wants to follow your wise philosophy.]

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:33AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @07:33AM (#1143462)

        Why you call Kone of course.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @12:57PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @12:57PM (#1143502)

        You must be European. In America, we use Otis elevators. I got in a Krupp once, and it started malfunctioning like it was going to entomb everyone.

        Maybe his beef with Krupp is not elevators, but their centuries long history of being arms suppliers. Don't know.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @01:16PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @01:16PM (#1143507)

          Otis makes escalators, too.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by janrinok on Wednesday June 09, @07:31AM (3 children)

    by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 09, @07:31AM (#1143461) Journal

    But why not just do the assembly in Germany to? This shipping things back and forth — isn't this one of the points of failure that has been experienced during COVID-19?7

    Not that I'm aware of - the huge reduction in passengers flights has not been mirrored in air transport flights, or not to any significant degree as far as my ADSB records show. There are daily flights into and out of Europe to most places in the world, just as surface transport has continued. Ships are still crossing the oceans - remember the problem with the blockage in the Suez Canal? - and road haulage has continued except for a matter of a few days (and ignoring the disruption due to Brexit between the UK and the rest of Europe).

    --
    It's always my fault...
    • (Score: 3, Informative) by crafoo on Wednesday June 09, @10:38AM (2 children)

      by crafoo (6639) on Wednesday June 09, @10:38AM (#1143480)

      Not true at all. Surface transport has been greatly disrupted in all major US ports, and most likely other ports around the world (I didn't check). There are container stackups in ports that do not have significant exports because it just isn't worth it to waste crane operator time stacking them when they are already so behind on actual, loaded containers. Ships were sitting out at anchor for weeks on end.

      This is why, for instance, you can't buy a Honda generator and no one knows when they will be in stock again. Also, mass inflation about to hit so people are buying up real, tangible assets now.

      The supply chain was heavily disrupted by the COVID scare. Just-In-Time manufacturing failed, worldwide.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @12:53PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @12:53PM (#1143500)

        Just In Time is just another word for zero safety margin. System is run to the edge with no room for hiccups, resulting in catastrophic failure if anything happens.

      • (Score: 2) by janrinok on Wednesday June 09, @01:52PM

        by janrinok (52) Subscriber Badge on Wednesday June 09, @01:52PM (#1143513) Journal

        Perhaps the problem was that people were being isolated in the US - not that the ships or aircraft could not operate. That suggests that procedures needed to be changed. What were all those ships queuing to enter the Suez Canal carrying? Where were they going? I'll bet that a lot of freight was still being moved. Freight aircraft including DHL, FedEx, ABX and many others have crossed my location everyday. Do you suppose they were just burning fuel for the fun of it? I suspect that they were doing what they do best - hauling freight.

        My SiL handles manages the movement of some aircraft in the Toulouse area. They are flying some freight just as they always have done - but with additional medical checks because of Covid 19.

        Passenger aircraft is a different story entirely - none essential travel (including holidays or meetings that could be held online) was stopped. But, as far as Europe is concerned, essential goods (especially foodstuffs) were still moving, non-essential goods were not so lucky. I guess those container ships were carrying stuff that is just not that important to everyday survival.

        --
        It's always my fault...
  • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Wednesday June 09, @02:04PM

    by HiThere (866) on Wednesday June 09, @02:04PM (#1143518) Journal

    But why not just do the assembly in Germany too? This shipping things back and forth — isn't this one of the points of failure that has been experienced during COVID-19?

    My guess would be that they're building one part of the process at a time, and if/after the first part is working well, they'll expand into the rest of the chain.

    --
    Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @02:46PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @02:46PM (#1143532)

    But why not just do the assembly in Germany to?

    Because there is a shortage of labour in Germany. Even shipping this to Eastern Europe would probably not work, short term, since plants don't exist. So you ship to places that have been doing this packaging for more than 2 decades already - Malaysia or Indonesia.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @04:56PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday June 09, @04:56PM (#1143586)

    this is good...and why is this news?

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