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posted by hubie on Friday March 29, @07:42AM   Printer-friendly
from the far-out dept.

https://arstechnica.com/space/2024/03/heres-our-comprehensive-in-depth-guide-to-viewing-the-total-solar-eclipse/

If you enter "how to see the eclipse" into your favorite search engine, you're bound to see thousands—millions?—of helpful guides. Some of these are extremely detailed and thorough, almost as if the author were getting paid by the word or augmented by AI.

In reality, seeing a solar eclipse is just about the easiest thing one can do in one's life. Like, it's difficult to think of anything else that has the greatest reward-lowest effort ratio in life. You just need to know a couple of things. For the sake of simplicity, here is Ars' four-step guide to having a four-star eclipse-viewing experience. Steps are listed in order of ascending importance.

[...] In reality, a total solar eclipse is probably going to be the most spectacular celestial event most of us see in our lifetimes. Certainly, there could be more spectacular ones. A supernova within 100 light-years of Earth would be amazing. Witnessing a large asteroid streaking through Earth's atmosphere before impact would be incredible.

Unfortunately, those would also be lethal.

Related stories on SoylentNews:
Daily Telescope: A Solar Eclipse From the Surface of Mars - 2024-02-14
Annular Solar Eclipse October 2023 and Total in April 2024 - 2023-10-02
NASA's Perseverance Rover Captures Video of Solar Eclipse on Mars - 2022-04-22
How to Watch Rare "Ring of Fire" Solar Eclipse - 2021-06-09
Coming Jan 31st: a Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse - First Time in 150 Years - 2018-01-05


Original Submission

Related Stories

Coming Jan 31st: a Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse - First Time in 150 Years 38 comments

According to a report at phys.org, The moon is about to do something it hasn't done in more than 150 years:

Three separate celestial events will occur simultaneously that night, resulting in what some are calling a super blue blood moon eclipse. The astronomical rarity hasn't happened for more than 150 years.

A super moon, like the one visible on New Year's Day, is the term for when a full moon is closest to the Earth in its orbit, appearing bigger and brighter than normal.

On Jan. 31, the moon will be full for the second time in a month, a rare occasion—it happens once every two and a half years—known as a blue moon.

To top it off, there will also be a total lunar eclipse. But unlike last year's solar eclipse, this sky-watching event isn't going to be as visible in the continental United States. The best views of the middle-of-the-night eclipse will be in central and eastern Asia, Indonesia, New Zealand and Australia, although Alaska and Hawaii will get a glimpse, too.

For the rest of the U.S., the eclipse will come too close to when the moon sets for the phenomenon to be visible.

Because of the way the light filters through the atmosphere during an eclipse, blue light is bounced away from the moon, while red light is reflected. The eclipsed moon's reddish color earned it the nickname blood moon.

Super blue blood moon?

So, an extremely noble or socially prominent moon? ;)

I wonder what differences, if any, there would be in the appearance of the Earth from a person standing on the moon, compared to a "normal" full moon?


Original Submission

How to Watch Rare "Ring of Fire" Solar Eclipse 12 comments

[Ed note: if anyone happens upon a better link about the eclipse — where and when it is visible — please post it to the comments!

How to watch next week's rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse:

Last month's "super flower blood moon" lunar eclipse was hardly the only exciting celestial event of the season. Next week brings an even bigger spectacle — a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse.

On June 10, skywatchers all over the world will be able to view the eclipse.

[...] A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes directly between the Earth and the sun, completely blocking the sun's light. During an annular solar eclipse, the moon does not completely cover the sun as it passes, leaving a glowing ring of sunlight visible.

An annular eclipse can only occur under specific conditions, NASA says. The moon must be in its first lunar phase, and it must also be farther away from Earth in its elliptical orbit, appearing smaller in the sky than it usually would.

Because the moon appears smaller under these circumstances, it cannot fully block out the sun, forming what's called a "ring of fire" or "ring of light."

"As the pair rises higher in the sky, the silhouette of the Moon will gradually shift off the sun to the lower left, allowing more of the Sun to show until the eclipse ends," NASA said.

[...] It is essential to wear special solar eclipse glasses to protect your eyes while viewing the celestial phenomenon. Looking directly at the sun is dangerous and can damage your eyes.

This is just one of two solar eclipses in 2021. A total solar eclipse will be visible on December 4.

Also at CNN, PhysOrg, c|net, and SciTechDaily.


Original Submission

NASA’s Perseverance Rover Captures Video of Solar Eclipse on Mars 9 comments

The Mastcam-Z camera recorded video of Phobos, one of the Red Planet’s two moons:

NASA’s Perseverance Mars rover has captured dramatic footage of Phobos, Mars’ potato-shaped moon, crossing the face of the Sun. These observations can help scientists better understand the moon’s orbit and how its gravity pulls on the Martian surface, ultimately shaping the Red Planet’s crust and mantle.

Captured with Perseverance’s next-generation Mastcam-Z camera on April 2, the 397th Martian day, or sol, of the mission, the eclipse lasted a little over 40 seconds – much shorter than a typical solar eclipse involving Earth’s Moon. (Phobos is about 157 times smaller than Earth’s Moon. Mars’ other moon, Deimos, is even smaller.)

[...]. “I knew it was going to be good, but I didn’t expect it to be this amazing,” said Rachel Howson of Malin Space Science Systems in San Diego, one of the Mastcam-Z team members who operates the camera.

[...] Color also sets this version of a Phobos solar eclipse apart. Mastcam-Z has a solar filter that acts like sunglasses to reduce light intensity. “You can see details in the shape of Phobos’ shadow, like ridges and bumps on the moon’s landscape,” said Mark Lemmon, a planetary astronomer with the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colorado, who has orchestrated most of the Phobos observations by Mars rovers. “You can also see sunspots. And it’s cool that you can see this eclipse exactly as the rover saw it from Mars.

Kudos to the orbitologists who knew the positions of all the appropriate bodies and got the timing right. The really cool video is also up on YouTube (but I don't think you would call this an annular eclipse since nothing looks like an annulus!)


Original Submission

Annular Solar Eclipse October 2023 and Total in April 2024 2 comments

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/eclipses/home/

Safety is the number one priority when viewing a solar eclipse. Be sure you're familiar with and follow these safety guidelines when viewing an eclipse.
[...]
Quick fact:
The U.S. will experience the next two solar eclipses: an annular in October 2023 and a total in April 2024. You can see the paths and download the map of these eclipses here. See Also: Annular Solar Eclipse: October 14, 2023
Total Solar Eclipse: April 8, 2024

from Annular solar eclipse 2023: Everything you need to know about North America's 'ring of fire' eclipse

Roughly 11 years after the same type of solar eclipse crossed the U.S. Southwest on May 20, 2012, this one will be visible from a similar region, crossing eight U.S. states from Oregon to Texas, according to NASA.

During an annular solar eclipse, the moon appears slightly smaller than the sun, so it can't block the entire disk. The result is a beautiful "ring of fire." Here's everything you need to know about this rare event.

The Total Solar Eclipse event on April 8, 2024 will be a Partial Solar Eclipse in the UK. Solar and Lunar Eclipses in Europe – Next 10 Years


Original Submission

Daily Telescope: a Solar Eclipse from the Surface of Mars 3 comments

https://arstechnica.com/space/2024/02/daily-telescope-a-solar-eclipse-from-the-surface-of-mars/

Good morning. It's February 12, and today's image is a real treat from the surface of Mars.

In it we see the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, passing in front of the Sun.

[...] NASA released a bunch of these raw images last week, and planetary scientist Paul Byrne helpfully put them into a video sequence that can be seen here.

[...] Source: NASA/JPL-Caltech/ASU

Related stories on SoylentNews:
Annular Solar Eclipse October 2023 and Total in April 2024 - 20231002
NASA's Perseverance Rover Captures Video of Solar Eclipse on Mars - 20220422
How to Watch Rare "Ring of Fire" Solar Eclipse - 20210609
Coming Jan 31st: a Super Blue Blood Moon Eclipse - First Time in 150 Years - 20180105


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Thexalon on Friday March 29, @12:32PM (9 children)

    by Thexalon (636) on Friday March 29, @12:32PM (#1350836)

    What's going to be involved:
    1. A thorough cleaning of my house from top to bottom to house all the traveling relatives and acquaintances and other guests. Hotels are basically not an option, they're all booked, and it's a bit cold for camping out.
    2. Dealing with cops and mobilized National Guard all over the place.
    3. Non-emergency travel, even over short distances, is likely to be difficult at best. That means food delivery or takeout is not an option, for example.
    4. Even emergency vehicles might not be able to get to where they're needed easily.

    And then when that's all settled, assuming the sky is clear enough, we'll get one of the most spectacular and unique sights you'll ever see in your entire life. I traveled to see the last one several years ago, and there's really nothing else quite like it, and it's well worth the hassle.

    --
    The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Friday March 29, @01:12PM

      by Freeman (732) on Friday March 29, @01:12PM (#1350841) Journal

      I am as well, essentially. No relatives coming to visit though. They're already all here, don't care, have their own plans, or aren't all that close.

      I'm hoping that since the area we're in is "small" that we won't be too overrun. Then again, I'm hearing about places with 5k residents expecting 30k people to show up . . . so I'm not too hopeful.

      --
      Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
    • (Score: 2) by DadaDoofy on Friday March 29, @01:23PM (4 children)

      by DadaDoofy (23827) on Friday March 29, @01:23PM (#1350847)

      "Dealing with cops and mobilized National Guard all over the place."

      Why? I've been watch eclipses since the early 70's. I don't ever remember the National Guard being necessary. What's changed?

      • (Score: 4, Touché) by Gaaark on Friday March 29, @02:12PM (2 children)

        by Gaaark (41) on Friday March 29, @02:12PM (#1350854) Journal

        People.

        People changed.

        People have died doing stupid things for likes and clicks.

        People having gotten stupid and rude.

        Hell is other people.

        --
        --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
        • (Score: 2) by aafcac on Friday March 29, @02:34PM (1 child)

          by aafcac (17646) on Friday March 29, @02:34PM (#1350859)

          Have the really changed that much over the last less than decade? Or is this a reflection of the government flat out not trusting the folks in those parts of the country to not behave like savages when the sun disappears? Because the main thing I remember was a complete inability to continue any further when the eclipse started and we just pulled off at the next exit and hung out in the parking lot of a Cabelas while the eclipse happened.

          • (Score: 2, Interesting) by khallow on Saturday March 30, @03:17PM

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Saturday March 30, @03:17PM (#1351013) Journal
            It's more that there's really a lot of people out watching these eclipses. Think of it this way: on a normal day, everyone is inside. On an eclipse day, they're all outside along with their friends and relatives from outside the band of totality and there's a lot of driving and people looking for places to stay the night. It's an enormous movement of people in and out. If your transportation and lodging infrastructure struggles with normal peak load, it will be a real mess on eclipse day. To give an example, for the last North American total eclipse, several hundred thousand people showed up in the Grand Tetons National Park in Wyoming. That area has like half a dozen access roads, all two lane. The state's population probably doubled for that event.
      • (Score: 2) by Thexalon on Friday March 29, @02:44PM

        by Thexalon (636) on Friday March 29, @02:44PM (#1350862)

        Don't ask me, ask the governor, but my guess is that they're simply worried about the sheer number of tourists and the need to direct a lot of traffic.

        --
        The only thing that stops a bad guy with a compiler is a good guy with a compiler.
    • (Score: 2) by Gaaark on Friday March 29, @02:10PM

      by Gaaark (41) on Friday March 29, @02:10PM (#1350851) Journal

      During the last big eclipse, we were coming back from Disney World. We stopped at the Mammoth Caverns place hoping to show our son the caves (last time we came it was easy).

      Kentucky was prime viewing area for the eclipse, and we got a surprise...and so did the staff at Mammoth Caves.

      The line-ups for the caves were so long that the staff were coming out and taking pictures! They'd never experienced line-ups like that.

      In the end we had to do a walking tour of a 'meh' cave and were disappointed for our son (the 'best' cave was so awesome and wanted to share it with him).

      I too live in prime viewing area and am expecting a load of 'tourists' in the area (all my family lives here, though).

      --
      --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 29, @02:11PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 29, @02:11PM (#1350852)

      Ditto. We're inside totality and about 20 miles from Niagara Falls...which is one of the more spectacular backdrops for the eclipse (if the sky is clear!) The region (USA & Canada) is expecting masses of people, possibly more than currently live here. I used to like crowds (big outdoor concerts, etc), but not anymore--we're stocking up a day or two early, planning to stay off the road Monday and watch from home.

      A couple of friends inquired about staying with us, but once they saw how cloudy it can be here in the spring they have chosen other viewing locations. At least one friend is going away for the long weekend, so they will miss the eclipse...and any potential problems that may arise from the crush of people.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 29, @05:14PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday March 29, @05:14PM (#1350882)

      it's a bit cold for camping out.

      During the last one, they were all prepped for August heat but it was cooler than normal. That made for pleasant days, but definitely some chilly nights in the tent. Pity the man who was solo-camping or not willing to spoon another man.

  • (Score: 3, Interesting) by gznork26 on Friday March 29, @07:12PM

    by gznork26 (1159) on Friday March 29, @07:12PM (#1350898) Homepage Journal

    My favorite way to view a solar eclipse is to stand under a tree whose foliage produces dappled sunlight on the ground. During the eclipse, each one acts as a pinhole camera projecting an image of the sun on the ground, so you're surrounded by innumerable images of the event.

    But my most memorable total eclipse happened on March 7, 1970. I was a freshman in the BS program in Space Technology at Florida Institute of Technology, and the astronomy club arranged to borrow a bus to take us and our gear to Perry, which had billed itself as the Eclipse Capitol of the World for the event. We arrived the night before, and set up in the park we thought we had arranged space in. But around dawn, there was a knock at the door... local cop telling us we were in the wrong park. As the day started, and we moved to the correct spot, it became obvious that we'd be having a cloud cover, so we did our best to set up the clock drive for the 'scope. We also set up our radio receiver, but power had to be drawn via coupled extensions from a nearby hot dog stand.

    As other groups arrived, we watched as a team of Italian scientists and US Air Force folk discovered that their radio for getting a time signal from WWV was dead, and lucked into one offered by a busload of school kids from out of state. When eclipse time was approaching, and it appears that there would not be a break in that cloud cover, the Air Force guys wrangled a TV onto the top of their van, so everyone could watch a remote feed of the eclipse on broadcast while actually under the past of totality.

    Finally, when it got dim and them light again, we watched the erratic trace from the radio telescope's chart recorder, and concluded that the data reflected either the number of hot dogs per unit time, or the number of Volkswagens driving over the extension's junction box.

    Back on campus, it was clear, and they all watched a 90% eclipse in comfort.

    Sigh.

    --
    Khipu were Turing complete.
  • (Score: 2) by ese002 on Saturday March 30, @03:54AM

    by ese002 (5306) on Saturday March 30, @03:54AM (#1350967)

    In reality, seeing a solar eclipse is just about the easiest thing one can do in one's life. Like, it's difficult to think of anything else that has the greatest reward-lowest effort ratio in life. You just need to know a couple of things. For the sake of simplicity, here is Ars' four-step guide to having a four-star eclipse-viewing experience. Steps are listed in order of ascending importance.

    None of these cover the chief difficulty of seeing an eclipse: getting there. Sure, if your house on the center line and the weather is perfect, then everything is easy. But that is cosmological good luck. In the real world, you will almost certainly have to travel. And then you find the flights and hotels not already booked are outrageously expensive. If you get over those problems, then you have to worry about the weather at your chosen viewing location. This is especially an issue for this eclipse. Much of the path is deep in the rainiest part of the year. If you find yourself clouded or rained out you then have to make a decision and move quickly. But everyone else is doing the same thing so the roads are congested.

    If you manage to get where you need to be and see the spectacle, hooray! Now you need to go home. You will no likely the mother of all traffic jams. Two hours can into twelve.

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