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posted by martyb on Tuesday May 30 2017, @02:35PM   Printer-friendly
from the moah-fasteh dept.

Recently, Intel was rumored to be releasing 10 and 12 core "Core i9" CPUs to compete with AMD's 10-16 core "Threadripper" CPUs. Now, Intel has confirmed these as well as 14, 16, and 18 core Skylake-X CPUs. Every CPU with 6 or more cores appears to support quad-channel DDR4:

Intel CoreCores/ThreadsPrice$/core
i9-7980XE18/36$1,999$111
i9-7960X16/32$1,699$106
i9-7940X14/28$1,399$100
i9-7920X12/24$1,199$100
i9-7900X10/20$999$100
i7-7820X8/16$599$75
i7-7800X6/12$389$65
i7-7740X4/8$339$85
i7-7640X4/4$242$61 (less threads)

Last year at Computex, the flagship Broadwell-E enthusiast chip was launched: the 10-core i7-6950X at $1,723. Today at Computex, the 10-core i9-7900X costs $999, and the 16-core i9-7960X costs $1,699. Clearly, AMD's Ryzen CPUs have forced Intel to become competitive.

Although the pricing of AMD's 10-16 core Threadripper CPUs is not known yet, the 8-core Ryzen R7 launched at $500 (available now for about $460). The Intel i7-7820X has 8 cores for $599, and will likely have better single-threaded performance than the AMD equivalent. So while Intel's CPUs are still more expensive than AMD's, they may have similar price/performance.

For what it's worth, Intel also announced quad-core Kaby Lake-X processors.

Welcome to the post-quad-core era. Will you be getting any of these chips?


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