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posted by janrinok on Thursday June 10, @12:30PM   Printer-friendly
from the this-is-infrastructure dept.

From Spiked:

If life ever returns to normal, one thing no one will miss from the lockdown era is the 'TV goldfish'. For over a year, we've watched the disembodied, pixelated faces of contributors to live TV mouth their words out of sync with their audio, gulping away as if in a private fish tank. This isn't the exception for internet video, it's the norm.

John Day is one of the internet's greybeard founding fathers. For a decade he has been advancing a set of improvements to the current mainstream internet protocols. His proposals – called RINA (Recursive Internetwork Architecture) – revisit and build on Louis Pouzin's founding concept of datagrams (data packets). Simplifying these features allowed the original inter-networking protocols (IP) to get out of the door in the 1980s and 1990s, and allowed for the rapid growth of the internet. But the current system we have – TCP/IP – is holding back new innovation.

See also: Internet outage illustrates lack of resilience at heart of critical services
The Guardian view on the internet outage: we need resilience, not just efficiency


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  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by TheGratefulNet on Thursday June 10, @01:00PM (2 children)

    by TheGratefulNet (659) on Thursday June 10, @01:00PM (#1143867)

    started reading TFA but then gave up when I realized they had no idea at all.

    its not about qos. qos to deliver ADS to us, better?

    no, at least 2 thiings are wrong that need fixing:

    - remove the infestation where 'tracking' is a 'thing'. that's problem 1. it causes cdn's to deliver 1 pixel 'images'. that's insane! its not for us, its for them, so that makes it all wrong.

    - revisit the whole idea of 'producers provide data; consumers are allowed/encouraged to constrain/control/filter that data to their choosing'. yeah, I mean widespread adblockers and element hiders. only geeks 'edit' their viewed pages thru smart filters and the rest get pushed a bunch of toxic garbage that lessens the whole experience

    qos is fine as it is. but making all pages require links and images that are NOT needed - that's insane. we allowed it and we were wrong in doing that.

    ok, maybe one more thing needs changing:

    - decentralized control, so that no powerful entities can take things down or pollute the data with their crap. this is all about security and removing the ability to detect fake messages (authentication if you want it) and mulitple redundant resources and paths so that things can't be 'taken down' as easily.

    the economic problem (the ads model) is #1, though. that will never be fixed. we farked it up for good, I'm afraid.

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  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by JoeMerchant on Thursday June 10, @02:10PM

    by JoeMerchant (3937) on Thursday June 10, @02:10PM (#1143884)

    The summary makes it sound like IP is broken... to me it's more in the higher layers.

    If you can have an HTML5 audio-video solution that handles its own data in UDP, and doesn't cram a bunch of unwanted stuff onto the channel with your desired stream - that should be good enough.

    If I recall correctly, we've had fairly solid audio-video capability for ~15 years now, at least if you had the best gear and connections 15 years ago - today just about everybody's in-home WiFi outperforms all but the best professional office connections from 2006.

    Reworking the infrastructure will only dodge the problems with the current system temporarily, all the same crap is going to crawl into the new infrastructure in a short time and that brilliant improvement demonstrated at rollout will melt away to resemble what we have today.

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  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 10, @04:46PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 10, @04:46PM (#1143937)

    There's that, but the bigger issue is the way that a few social media companies are effectively blocking off large portions of the internet behind paywalls and registration. One of the great things about the net when I first had an account decades back was that there was very little of that. For the most part, you could visit any site you liked and relatively few sites weren't completely accessible.