Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

SoylentNews is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop. Only 19 submissions in the queue.

Submission Preview

Link to Story

Metal-based field emission air channel transistor (ACT) could keep Moore's law going 20 more years

Accepted submission by RandomFactor at 2018-12-02 15:09:20 from the I'm not..dead..yet! -Moore's Law dept.
Science

Researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, believe a metal-based field emission air channel transistor (ACT) [ieee.org] they have developed could maintain transistor doubling for another two decades.

The team has developed a functional proof of concept and is currently working to improve stability and efficiency.

"Unlike conventional transistors that have to sit in silicon bulk, our device is a bottom-to-top fabrication approach starting with a substrate. This enables us to build fully 3D transistor networks, if we can define optimum air gaps,” says Shruti Nirantar, lead author of a paper on the new transistor published this month in Nano Letters. [acs.org] “This means we can stop pursuing miniaturization, and instead focus on compact 3D architecture, allowing more transistors per unit volume."

Narantir continues

the theoretical speed of an ACT is in the terahertz range, some 10 thousand times as fast as the speed at which current semiconductor devices work.

The approach also has a number of compelling advantages over traditional silicon semiconductors including far fewer processing steps, simpler fabrication on any dielectric surface, and better resistance to radiation.

Narantir concludes

“With [industry] help and sufficient research funding, there is the potential to develop commercial-grade field emission air-channel transistors within the next decade—and that’s a generous timeline. With the right partners, this could happen more quickly.”


Original Submission