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posted by on Wednesday April 26 2017, @01:38PM   Printer-friendly
from the no-haptic-feedback dept.

BrightSignGlove [Tumblr warning: script heavy and next to zero text] is a student project which recognises sign language and converts it into text. Users familiar with sign language [American Sign Language?] are able to capture large quantities of text and optionally output text to a large format display or a short message system - many of which are popular with deaf users. Custom gestures can be used to manage messages and it is conceivable that gestures could be used with home automation. This would be of particular benefit to users with mobility problems.

[Ed. Note: An older text article with a description of the glove and what it does. Seems very useful.]


Original Submission

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Yet Another Sign Language Glove 10 comments

Another slow news day; yet another sign language glove. But this time it is different!

Specifically, the DailyFail covers a New Scientist report about US$100 gloves which translate ASL [American Sign Language].

It is perhaps not as medically useful as a rectal haptic logging device or stroke recovery glove, perhaps not as visionary and audacious as the 1989 Nintendo Power Glove, but perhaps some of the numerous sign language gloves can be used as ambidexterous VR gloves? Likewise, when the crypto-currency market crashes again there'll be a huge surplus of GPUs for VR.

Full disclosure: I'm easily amused; especially with purile jokes about cyber logging and stroking aids. However, in the last two months, I filed a haptics patent (which started as a purile joke). Also, I'm working on a US$300 immersive sound system and I'll have a large number of spare I/O pins.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 26 2017, @01:49PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 26 2017, @01:49PM (#500014)

    What's the benefit?
    You can already type on your phone and show it to the other person.

  • (Score: 2) by VLM on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:11PM (2 children)

    by VLM (445) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:11PM (#500081)

    I'm surprised the DOD didn't fund automated logging and transmission of infantry hand signals. I'm sure the more micromanagement style of officers would fund that.

    Integration with radios would be fascinating... can't see your squad leader, who cares your earpiece tells you he says to run to the left right now.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by inertnet on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:59PM (1 child)

      by inertnet (4071) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:59PM (#500118) Journal

      Military hand signals are outdated already. They now wear a vest that can silently buzz those signals.

      On a different but related subject, I'm surprised they still don't have a microphone mesh network (at least 1 mic per soldier and/or drone/bot) that can determine the exact location of ambient sounds (like enemy fire, vehicles or drones).

  • (Score: 2) by PinkyGigglebrain on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:54PM (3 children)

    by PinkyGigglebrain (4458) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @03:54PM (#500114)

    I remember seeing something like this back in the mid to late 1990's, I think it was on "Beyond 2000" or some other tech show of the time. And then hearing about someone else in the mid 2000's developing the same tech again.

    Be great if one of these developers could actually get these devices into production, it would really help people who can only communicate with sign language to be more independent and participate in society.

    --
    "Beware those who would deny you Knowledge, For in their hearts they dream themselves your Master."
    • (Score: 2) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Wednesday April 26 2017, @04:22PM

      by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @04:22PM (#500133)

      My mind was blown about 20 years ago seeing a similar Science Fair project (I was young at the time).

      That one was not terribly reliable: essentially switches glued to a glove. Computer (Apple II) decoded hand positions.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 27 2017, @12:20AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday April 27 2017, @12:20AM (#500433)
      A device like this was described in Michael Crichton’s novel Congo. They hooked it up to a gorilla who had been taught sign language.
      • (Score: 1) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Thursday April 27 2017, @01:37AM

        by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Thursday April 27 2017, @01:37AM (#500459)

        No, it was not IIRC.

        It was added to the Hollywood version so that the audience would know what the Gorilla was saying. In the book, the gorilla's handler understood sign language, so a fragile computer was not needed to translate.

  • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:12PM (5 children)

    by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:12PM (#500167)

    I need one of those, connected to a screen at the back of my car.
    Coding should be easy, as it mostly needs to translate one gesture. It can also use a tiny screen, since the intended reader is always so close.

    (actually, for the second most-needed gesture, I need someone to translate "have you heard that highways have a right lane, and that driving in it will not cause you to spontaneously combust?")

    • (Score: 0, Offtopic) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:20PM (4 children)

      by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:20PM (#500174)

      Cars already have signal lights to replace hand gestures.

      You are supposed to know those gestures in case somebody on the road is using them because their signal light either failed or are not present.

      • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:25PM (2 children)

        by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:25PM (#500181)

        What's the Poe's law equivalent for "can't tell if missed the point" ?

        • (Score: 1) by Scruffy Beard 2 on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:35PM (1 child)

          by Scruffy Beard 2 (6030) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:35PM (#500194)

          I mostly ignored the point.

          • (Score: 2) by bob_super on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:43PM

            by bob_super (1357) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:43PM (#500202)

            It is considered proper etiquette to start your own thread, then.
            Answering with an unrelated statement and no warning does not contribute to optimum reading pleasure.

      • (Score: 1, Flamebait) by VLM on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:27PM

        by VLM (445) on Wednesday April 26 2017, @05:27PM (#500186)

        Supposedly bicyclists use those hand signals. You're about as likely to see that as you are to see a bicyclist follow every other traffic rule (all of which apparently are optional if you have no motor)

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