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posted by Snow on Monday August 27 2018, @10:54PM   Printer-friendly
from the cyber-gun-naut dept.

Judge allows temporary ban on 3D-printed gun files to continue

A federal judge in Seattle has ruled against Defense Distributed, imposing a preliminary injunction requiring the company to keep its 3D-printed gun files offline for now.

US District Judge Robert Lasnik found in his Monday ruling that the plaintiffs were likely to succeed based on their argument that the Department of State, in allowing for a modification of federal export law, had unwittingly run afoul of a different law, the Administrative Procedure Act. In essence, the judge found that because the Department of State did not formally notify Congress when it modified the United States Munitions List, the previous legal settlement that Defense Distributed struck with the Department of State—which allowed publication of the files—is invalid.

As Ars has reported, Defense Distributed is the Texas-based company involved in a years-long lawsuit with the Department of State over publication of those files and making them available to foreigners. The company runs DEFCAD, perhaps the best-known online repository of gun files.

[...] Judge Lasnik's ruling today only briefly addressed the fact that the files are already available on numerous sites, including Github, The Pirate Bay, and more. These files have circulated online since their original publication back in 2013. (Recently, new mirrors of the files have begun to pop up.) "It is not clear how available the nine files are: the possibility that a cybernaut with a BitTorrent protocol will be able to find a file in the dark or remote recesses of the Internet does not make the posting to Defense Distributed's site harmless," he wrote.

Will legalnauts with gavels smack down this injunction?

Previously: Landmark Legal Shift for 3D-Printed Guns
[Updated] Defense Distributed Releasing Gun Plans, President Trump "Looking Into" It

Related: The $1,200 Machine That Lets Anyone Make a Metal Gun at Home
FedEx Refuses to Ship Defense Distributed's Ghost Gunner CNC Mill


Original Submission

Related Stories

The $1,200 Machine That Lets Anyone Make a Metal Gun at Home 59 comments

When Cody Wilson revealed the world’s first fully 3-D printed gun last year, he showed that the “maker” movement has enabled anyone to create a working, lethal firearm with a click in the privacy of his or her garage. Now he’s moved on to a new form of digital DIY gunsmithing. And this time the results aren’t made of plastic.

Wilson’s latest radically libertarian project is a PC-connected milling machine he calls the Ghost Gunner. Like any computer-numerically-controlled (or CNC) mill, the one-foot-cubed black box uses a drill bit mounted on a head that moves in three dimensions to automatically carve digitally-modeled shapes into polymer, wood or aluminum. But this CNC mill, sold by Wilson’s organization known as Defense Distributed for $1,200, is designed to create one object in particular: the component of an AR-15 rifle known as its lower receiver.

That simple chunk of metal has become the epicenter of a gun control firestorm. A lower receiver is the body of the gun that connects its stock, barrel, magazine and other parts. As such, it’s also the rifle’s most regulated element. Mill your own lower receiver at home, however, and you can order the rest of the parts from online gun shops, creating a semi-automatic weapon with no serial number, obtained with no background check, no waiting period or other regulatory hurdles.
http://www.wired.com/2014/10/cody-wilson-ghost-gunner/

FedEx Refuses to Ship Defense Distributed's Ghost Gunner CNC Mill 43 comments

FedEx is refusing to ship Texas nonprofit Defense Distributed's computer controlled mill, the Ghost Gunner. The $1,500 tool can carve aluminum objects from digital designs, including AR-15 lower receivers from scratch or more quickly from legally obtainable "80 percent lowers".

When the machine was revealed last October, Defense Distributed's pre-orders sold out in 36 hours. But now FedEx tells WIRED it's too wary of the legal issues around homemade gunsmithing to ship the machine to customers. "This device is capable of manufacturing firearms, and potentially by private individuals," FedEx spokesperson Scott Fiedler wrote in a statement. "We are uncertain at this time whether this device is a regulated commodity by local, state or federal governments. As such, to ensure we comply with the applicable law and regulations, FedEx declined to ship this device until we know more about how it will be regulated."

But buying, selling, or using the Ghost Gunner isn't illegal, nor is owning an AR-15 without a serial number, says Adam Winkler, a law professor at UCLA and the author of Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. "This is not that problematic," he says. "Federal law does not prohibit individuals from making their own firearms at home, and that includes AR-15s."

Defense Distributed's founder Cody Wilson argues that rather than a legal ambiguity, FedEx is instead facing up to the political gray area of enabling the sale of new, easily accessible tools that can make anything-including deadly weapons. "They're acting like this is legal when in fact it's the expression of a political preference," says Wilson. "The artifact that they're shipping is a CNC mill. There's nothing about it that is specifically related to firearms except the hocus pocus of the marketing." Wilson, whose radically libertarian group has pursued projects ranging from 3-D printed guns to untraceable cryptocurrency, says he chose to ship his Ghost Gunner machines with FedEx specifically because the company has a special NRA firearm industry membership. But when he told a local FedEx representative what he'd be shipping, he says the sales rep responded that he'd need to check with a superior. "This is no big deal, right? It's just a mill," Wilson says he told his FedEx contact. "You guys ship guns. You've shipped 3-D printers and mills, right? You'll ship a drill press, right? Same difference."

Landmark Legal Shift for 3D-Printed Guns 92 comments

For those in the US with a combined interest in 3D-Printers, intersections of the 1st and 2nd Amendments, and legal precedents; Cody Wilson has been fighting the US Government for half a decade.

Short version: after Wilson uploaded his 3D pistol plans to his site, over 100,000 people downloaded it - this drew the attention of the US authorities, who tried to use the International Trade in Arms Regulations (ITAR) to force a take-down.

The authorities argued that by posting the 3D printer plans for a firearm, Mr. Wilson was effectively exporting firearms, and subject to federal regulation. Eventually the Department of Justice dropped the case, paving the way for DIY'ers to publish such things freely.

The article cites 'promises' made by DoJ to move the regulations to another department.

Wired's article: A Landmark Legal Shift Opens Pandora's Box for DIY Guns (archive)

Related: The $1,200 Machine That Lets Anyone Make a Metal Gun at Home
Japanese Gun Printer Goes to Jail
Suspected 3D-Printed Gun Parts and Plastic Knuckles Seized in Australia
FedEx Refuses to Ship Defense Distributed's Ghost Gunner CNC Mill
Man Who Used CNC Mill to Manufacture AR-15 "Lowers" Sentenced to 41 Months
Ghost Gunner Software Update Allows the Milling of an M1911 Handgun


Original Submission

[Updated] Defense Distributed Releasing Gun Plans, President Trump "Looking Into" It 76 comments

Trump says public availability of 3D-printed guns 'doesn't seem to make much sense'

President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he is "looking into" the availability of plans for the 3D printing of guns, writing on Twitter that he had already been in touch with the NRA on the issue.

"I am looking into 3-D Plastic Guns being sold to the public. Already spoke to NRA, doesn't seem to make much sense!" the president wrote on Twitter Tuesday morning.

After a years-long legal battle, Defense Distributed, a Texas-based group, has announced plans to release instructions on Wednesday for guns that can be created by a 3-D printer, including a handgun and parts for a semi-automatic assault rifle. Although plans were not supposed to be available until Wednesday, instructions have already begun to appear online for download, CNN reported Tuesday.

3D Gun File Downloads Blocked; Selling Begins Instead 16 comments

After being enjoined from distributing 3D CAD Files of firearms from his website, DEFCAD.com, Cody Wilson announces plans to sell the files for any chosen price.

In other words: If he can't be the "Napster" of crypto-guns, he'll be the "iTunes," Wilson told reporters at a press conference Tuesday in Austin.
...
Josh Blackman, Wilson's lawyer, said in an interview Tuesday that selling the blueprints directly to people within the United States is perfectly legal.

"It's not about distribution, it's about posting them," Blackman said. "There's no prohibition on distributing these files — the prohibition is on doing it in a way that foreign persons can access."

Also at The Register, BBC, and Ars Technica.

Previously: Federal Judge Imposes Preliminary Injunction Against Defense Distributed's DEFCAD


Original Submission

3D-Printed Gun Activist Cody Wilson Charged With Sexual Assault, Misses Flight Back From Taiwan 132 comments

We had submissions from two Soylentils on this story.

3D-Printed Gun Activist Cody Wilson Charged With Sexual Assault, Misses Flight Back From Taiwan

3-D Printed Gun Promoter, Cody Wilson, Is Charged With Sexual Assault of Child (archive)

Cody Wilson, whose push to post blueprints for 3-D printed guns online has made him a key figure in the national gun control debate, was charged on Wednesday with sexually assaulting a child in Texas.

But law enforcement officers said they were having trouble finding Mr. Wilson, who missed a flight back to the United States from Taipei, Taiwan, his last known location. During a news conference on Wednesday, Cmdr. Troy Officer of the Austin Police Department said that a warrant had been filed for Mr. Wilson's arrest and that local detectives were working with national and international partners to find him.

Mr. Wilson, 30, is accused of having sex with a 16-year-old girl at a hotel in Austin on Aug. 15 and paying her $500 in cash, according to an affidavit filed in Travis County. The girl told the police that she had met Mr. Wilson through the website SugarDaddyMeet.com, where he was using the screen name "Sanjuro," the affidavit says.

[...] She and Mr. Wilson, who identified himself to the girl, exchanged phone numbers and then continued messaging each other, sharing at least one explicit photo apiece, according to the affidavit. During one conversation, Mr. Wilson described himself as a "big deal," the affidavit says.

[...] Neither Mr. Wilson nor his lawyer in the sexual assault case responded to a request for comment. The Austin police said a friend of the victim had told Mr. Wilson before he left for Taiwan that he was under investigation.

Taiwan does not have an extradition treaty with the United States.

Looks like someone else will have to take on the job of defending file sharing in court.

Federal Judge Strikes Down DoJ's Deal with Defense Distributed 24 comments

Trump deal to share 3D-printed gun blueprints online ruled 'unlawful'

A federal judge has struck down a decision by the Trump administration to allow blueprints for 3D-printed guns to be shared online.

In a ruling published Tuesday, Judge Robert Lasnik said the deal made in July last year was "arbitrary and capricious" and thus a violation of the federal Administrative Procedure Act and the Constitution.

The original deal was part of a settlement between the Justice Department and Texas-based nonprofit Defense Distributed, which garnered worldwide attention in 2013 with its claims to have created the world's first "100 percent 3D-printed gun." The dissemination of plans for the gun was blocked by the Obama administration, but last year Defense Distributed successfully sued the government and had the ban reversed, arguing that it was a free speech violation.

[...] Bloomberg notes that the decision may still have limitations, given that Defense Distributed worked around a previous, temporary ban on downloading plans by simply mailing blueprints directly to customers. Said [spokesperson Chad] Flores: "The speech these states want so badly to censor is already on the internet and always will be."

Also at Bloomberg, NYT, and CBS.

Previously: Landmark Legal Shift for 3D-Printed Guns
[Updated] Defense Distributed Releasing Gun Plans, President Trump "Looking Into" It
Federal Judge Imposes Preliminary Injunction Against Defense Distributed's DEFCAD


Original Submission

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  • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 27 2018, @11:51PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 27 2018, @11:51PM (#727175)

    I have so many black friends, my homies gave my cracker ass Nword privilege. I got a certificate and had it notorized and everthing. Niggers rule.

    • (Score: 0, Troll) by ilPapa on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:20AM (1 child)

      by ilPapa (2366) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:20AM (#727184) Journal

      I have so many black friends, my homies gave my cracker ass Nword privilege. I got a certificate and had it notorized and everthing. Niggers rule.

      Mr. President, you're not fooling anyone.

      --
      You are still welcome on my lawn.
      • (Score: -1, Offtopic) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:35AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:35AM (#727230)

        Bathhouse Barry is out on cruises, without Michelle, son. He’s no longer president.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 27 2018, @11:51PM (17 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 27 2018, @11:51PM (#727176)

    Convicted felons can either make a 3D gun themselves, or buy one from a private party that makes 3D guns (since they are untraceable). Sure, it's still illegal for them to own a gun, but as a convicted felon it's clear they are not saddled with concerns about the law.

    Since private party gun sales are exempt from background checks the seller is in the clear as long as they don't ask any questions.

    Should this type of situation be enough to prevent Defense Distributed from selling the files? That's a gun control discussion. I guess we should also be asking "shouldn't convicted felons have the same right to protect their homes and families as anyone else?" Well, are these one-shot guns enough to protect a home?

    • (Score: 5, Insightful) by takyon on Monday August 27 2018, @11:56PM (15 children)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Monday August 27 2018, @11:56PM (#727179) Journal

      It's a First Amendment issue long before it even touches the Second Amendment. The injunction should be obliterated on appeal.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 1, Troll) by ilPapa on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:36AM (14 children)

        by ilPapa (2366) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:36AM (#727187) Journal

        It's a First Amendment issue long before it even touches the Second Amendment.

        That depends on how badly you want to torture the concept of "speech".

        Though, you might have a case for there being a freedom of religion issue, considering guns and Americans are involved.

        --
        You are still welcome on my lawn.
        • (Score: 5, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:42AM (5 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:42AM (#727191)

          That depends on how badly you want to torture the concept of "speech".

          Badly? How is providing instructions on how to build something not speech? Providing instructions on how to build a bomb is Constitutionally protected. Is sending data over the Internet speech? Is your post speech? Is it only speech if it uses a standard human language? That seems like a messy conclusion that would lead to an free speech absolute nightmare.

          Of course this qualifies as free speech. The only thing I'm thankful of is that all the files are already out there, and no one can really stop it.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:30AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:30AM (#727222)

            We are coining a "new" term to get around all that. Thought crime!

          • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:46AM

            by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:46AM (#727266) Homepage Journal

            Specifically The Hydrogen Bomb [progressive.org].

            A graduate student who'd done a summer internship at a bomb lab gave a Progressive reporter one of those back of the napkin sketches that we all keep going on about.

            Of course the Feds sued to block its publication but the Supremes ruled for the progressive.

            I don't know what happened to that student. Sucks to have been him I expect.

            Note that the plutonium rod is somewhat conical. The sphere at the top is a plutonium pit. The top part is a conventional plutonium implosion bomb. The X-rays reflect off the inside surface of the casing then a processing called Radiative Transfer heats and pressurizes the Tritium and Deuterium of which the styrofoam in the bottom part is partially composed of.

            That imploded the plutonium cone, with its energy and pressure being enough to lead the D and the T to fuse.

            At the very last minute the Feds quite desperately begged the Progressive not to publish that cone but to depict a cylinder instead.

            Now the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has the H.

            Some wiser head than mine DECLASSIFIED ALL BUT ONE OF THE MANHATTAN'S PROJECT SECRETS in 1965, I expect because the Chinese had just tested. You can even by The Los Alamos Primer from Amazon.

            That one still secret item is the design of the initiator. At just the right instant when the plutonium pit is at its minimum size, the initiator releases a burst of Neutrons so as to get the cascade reaction to go really, really well.

            When I read about the initiator in Richard Rhodes' The Making Of The Atomic Bomb I said to myself, "That just _has_ to work a certain way". By the time I completed Graduate Quantum Mechanics I am quite certain I knew enough to have designed that initiator with the help of the UCSC Science Library as well as the 386 box that I owned in the Fall of 1994.

            "Wiser heads".

            --
            Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
          • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:48PM

            by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:48PM (#727438) Journal

            The Judge in this case agrees with you. It's just that the Trump admin screwed up the implementation. If they can manage to actually do their jobs properly the judge expects this temporary order to be lifted.

          • (Score: 2) by ilPapa on Tuesday August 28 2018, @07:21PM (1 child)

            by ilPapa (2366) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @07:21PM (#727469) Journal

            The only thing I'm thankful of is that all the files are already out there

            If that's the only thing you're thankful of, you're living a very sad life.

            --
            You are still welcome on my lawn.
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 29 2018, @03:56PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday August 29 2018, @03:56PM (#727868)

              Why? I value freedom of speech, so it makes sense. Or are you pedantically taking issue with my use of the word "only"?

        • (Score: 4, Insightful) by hemocyanin on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:28AM (5 children)

          by hemocyanin (186) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:28AM (#727242) Journal

          What is a CAD file if not speech? It conveys an idea in three dimension in a format that can be inspected visually. It is nothing more than graphic art, very often of a functional object. If a CAD file is not speech, neither is something a person draws in Inkscape or Gimp or Photoshop -- this paint programs operate in two dimension but how does adding a third dimension make a CAD file any less the output of a person's imagination and intellect?

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:05PM (1 child)

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:05PM (#727361)

            What is a CAD file if not speech?

            A proprietary file format?

          • (Score: 2) by ElizabethGreene on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:29PM

            by ElizabethGreene (6748) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:29PM (#727424) Journal

            If the guts of PGP's code are free speech, then it's hard to make the argument that a Cad model or blueprint aren't free speech.

          • (Score: 2) by urza9814 on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:11PM (1 child)

            by urza9814 (3954) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:11PM (#727449) Journal

            That battle was lost before the 1st amendment right to free speech even existed thanks to concepts like copyright. You *never* had a right to freely distribute CAD files or other forms of schematics or creative works in this country. You can't say there can be no censorship, because the censorship already exists and always has. At this point we can only argue about the degree.

            Not that I disagree with you in theory...but arguing about an absolute right to free speech isn't likely to be productive, since that right has NEVER been legally recognized.

            • (Score: 1) by khallow on Tuesday August 28 2018, @10:45PM

              by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 28 2018, @10:45PM (#727537) Journal

              had a right to freely distribute CAD files or other forms of schematics or creative works in this country. You can't say there can be no censorship, because the censorship already exists and always has. At this point we can only argue about the degree.

              So does the government automatically own the copyright to speech it doesn't like? Else the objection isn't very relevant. One can have a great degree of free speech in the presence of copyright and such.

        • (Score: 3, Funny) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:36AM

          by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:36AM (#727265) Homepage Journal

          That was ruled just recently, I found out about the ruling only just now.

          In Florida and I expect a few other places, the City Councils banned the public feeding of homeless people. That led to such absurdities as a 95 year old man being arrested for ladling soup.

          --
          Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
        • (Score: 4, Insightful) by DannyB on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:39PM

          by DannyB (5839) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:39PM (#727332) Journal

          That depends on how badly you want to torture the concept of "speech".

          What if instead of a digital file, I printed the precise engineering drawings and specs in a booklet. With sufficient details that someone could get an off the shelf software package, enter the design into their software and then 3D print it.

          Why would that be any different than a book on gardening? (even if your garden has illegal plants)

          Would we ban books?

          Finally, it all seems so academic anyway when it is so easy to obtain an unregistered gun and, as a country, we seem to like it that way.

          --
          Reminder: March is National Procrastination Week.
    • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:30AM

      by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:30AM (#727261) Homepage Journal

      It happens that Washington has open carry.

      For a while now I've puzzled over trolling the whole gun control debate by taking the right of the mentally ill to bear arms all the way to the Supreme Court.

      And I would enjoy doing so.

      This because I like to read the law. Try it yourself - for quite a long time now all the SCOTUS decisions have been published on their website. I expect the appellate courts do that too. For case law that's not on The Series Of Tubes, every courthouse has a law library that's open to the public.

      The Supreme is _very_ clear that _every_ argument brought before it must ultimately be rooted in the Constitution.

      --
      Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
  • (Score: 5, Funny) by DavePolaschek on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:24AM (1 child)

    by DavePolaschek (6129) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:24AM (#727185) Homepage Journal

    Go to http://www.JudgeRobertLasnik.com [judgerobertlasnik.com] to get the files without a BitTorrent protocol.

  • (Score: 4, Insightful) by requerdanos on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:32AM (4 children)

    by requerdanos (5997) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:32AM (#727186) Journal

    US District Judge Robert Lasnik has effectively ordered something to not be on the Internet.

    Next up, King Cnute [wisc.edu] rules on whether the the waves are allowed to rise.

    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:06AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:06AM (#727200)

      One way I've heard it is that it was a stunt to encourage his people to convert from paganism to Christianity. The idea was that he would demonstrate that his power was inferior to the Christian god's.

      There is no such charitable interpretation available to Judge Robert Lasnik.

    • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:44PM

      by DannyB (5839) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:44PM (#727333) Journal

      Next up, King Cnute rules on whether the the waves are allowed to rise.

      Why not? US States are able to legislate that days have one less or one more hour of sunlight. Which has an effect on plant growth.

      --
      Reminder: March is National Procrastination Week.
    • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:42PM (1 child)

      by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:42PM (#727436) Journal

      US District Judge Robert Lasnik has effectively ordered something to not be on the Internet.

      Wrong. The judge specifically addressed that point, as described in the summary. He ordered Defense Distributed, alone, to stop publishing them (temporarily).

      the Department of State, in allowing for a modification of federal export law, had unwittingly run afoul of a different law, the Administrative Procedure Act. In essence, the judge found that because the Department of State did not formally notify Congress when it modified the United States Munitions List, the previous legal settlement that Defense Distributed struck with the Department of State—which allowed publication of the files—is invalid.

      Leave it to the Trump admin to fuck up the one thing I agree with them on.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:54AM (7 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @12:54AM (#727194)

    When these plans get released, the lawyers and prosecutors will have a field day. As DA I would charge them as an accessory. As the family lawyer, I would sue them for culpability.

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by DannyB on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:48PM (4 children)

      by DannyB (5839) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:48PM (#727335) Journal

      That seems like a very hypocritical position.

      We don't today go after anyone who provided an unregistered gun to a killer. As a nation we seem to like the idea of unregistered illegal guns with no background checks. No limitations on who can own a gun.

      --
      Reminder: March is National Procrastination Week.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:47PM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:47PM (#727375)

        It happens. Not often but there are cases of suppliers getting mail time.

        • (Score: 3, Funny) by DannyB on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:32PM

          by DannyB (5839) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:32PM (#727429) Journal

          That is an obvious typo. I'll assume you meant male time.

          --
          Reminder: March is National Procrastination Week.
      • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:46PM (1 child)

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:46PM (#727437) Journal

        We don't today go after anyone who provided an unregistered gun to a killer.

        Yes we do. [atf.gov]

        • (Score: 2) by DannyB on Wednesday August 29 2018, @01:22PM

          by DannyB (5839) on Wednesday August 29 2018, @01:22PM (#727811) Journal

          Enforcement doesn't seem to be uniform. Maybe even selective. If enforcement were working then the loopholes, especially gun shows, would not be complained about so much.

          --
          Reminder: March is National Procrastination Week.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:26PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:26PM (#727421)

      that's because you're a stupid bitch.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:00PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:00PM (#727500)

      Too bad the inventor of the knife passed away otherwise we could pin all knife attacks on him or her!! In that line we should have executed Albert Einstein for paving the way to the Atom Bomb. I guess we will also have to charge a rather large number of people with treason, arrest 33% of all cops, and jail pretty much every inventor ever.

      While I'm at it you need to compensate me for the emotional trauma of reading your authoritarian garbage.

  • (Score: 1) by exaeta on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:03AM

    by exaeta (6957) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:03AM (#727199) Homepage Journal

    I'd run for election in the house, so I could propose articles of impeachment. Impeach Lasnik 2020?

    --
    The Government is a Bird
  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:07AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @01:07AM (#727202)

    If the linked website goes down for whatever reason, I'm going to host the files (shortly) on http://newjustice.org/ [newjustice.org]
    Some of the older ones are already up.

  • (Score: 5, Insightful) by jmorris on Tuesday August 28 2018, @02:37AM (6 children)

    by jmorris (4844) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @02:37AM (#727211)

    So Defense Distributed is a Texas company. Washington DC has its own circuit just for Federal cases. So why do gun banning tyrants get to forum shop a friendly Judge way the Hell up in Seattle? We are seeing this more and more, where the Left gets to find one Judge willing to break the law and when things finally get high enough up the chain it gets thrown out but only after months and untold money gets spent. And these rogue judges pay no price for being political activists.

    There is not a possible rational argument to be made here. The 1st Amendment is clear. Adding "digital" or "on the Internet" to an ordinary thing does not magically transform it into a new thing. These files are plans to build a physical thing. A physical thing that is entirely legal to build and own for the vast majority of Americans. If one buys into Mr. Jefferson's rather bold claims they are the birthright of Right of every Free man on Earth.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:12PM (5 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @03:12PM (#727362)

      Ironic that you bring up forum shopping and Texas and try to blame the left.
      https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/27/business/supreme-court-patent-trolls-tc-heartland-kraft.html [nytimes.com]

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @04:10PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @04:10PM (#727389)

        That is all these trolls know how to do. They care nothing for facts and ttuth, just division and tears.

      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:04PM (3 children)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday August 28 2018, @05:04PM (#727409) Homepage Journal

        I wasn't aware that patent trolls were either left, or right. If I had given it a thought at all, I would suspect that they might be left. Look around at all the copyright trolls, from Hollyweird to Disney, to the MSM, to the record labels. Overwhelmingly left. Birds of a feather, ya know? Maybe we should look up our "favorite" patent trolls, and see how progressive they are?

        --
        Through a Glass, Darkly -George Patton
        • (Score: 2) by urza9814 on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:37PM (1 child)

          by urza9814 (3954) on Tuesday August 28 2018, @06:37PM (#727461) Journal

          So you think that either the US government is leftist (a concept whose hilarity I cannot begin to describe properly) or you think Hollywood is actively working against the US government (also friggin' absurd considering the amount of government dollars they get and the way they rely on the government to bail out their business model).

          What all of these companies/organizations that you mentioned actually want is for the government to take over the economy so they can use the publicly funded police and military to enforce their own regulations to prop up their failing industry. That's called fascism, which is a right-wing ideology.

          Easy mistake to make though, you just got the direction of power flow backwards. In a system trending towards fascism -- like we have currently -- the corporations absorb/rule over the government and the voters don't matter. In an extreme leftist (communist) society, the voters (via the government) absorb/rule over the corporations and the will of the person who founded that corporation doesn't matter.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:05PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:05PM (#727503)

            Don't bother trying to explain reality, this lot has long since given in to the Dorx Side.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:02PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday August 28 2018, @09:02PM (#727501)

          Well shit, you pegged us! At least we're not being represented by the Orange Demented One. I'll take evil Disney over that turd any day of the week.

          Nice poster child you've got there. What's that? You say you never voted for him? Well tough shit, that is what you are now. A trumpette by sheer proximity to those nutters.

          Are we done playing this stupid labeling game yet?

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