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posted by martyb on Saturday July 06 2019, @03:15AM   Printer-friendly
from the we-mean-business! dept.

AMD cuts Radeon 5700 GPU prices just two days before their release

When AMD announced its next-gen Navi-based Radeon RX 5700 and 5700 XT graphics cards last month, the news was just slightly underwhelming because the prices didn't necessarily make them the obvious alternative to Nvidia's rival chips.

But just two days before their July 7th launch date, AMD has taken the drastic step of dropping the prices on these new GPUs.

The Radeon 5700 XT, previously listed at $450, will now cost $400, and the Radeon 5700, previously $380, will be priced at $350. (There's also a $500 Radeon RX 5700 XT 50th Anniversary Edition that'll retail for $450.)

That's just super.

Also at Tom's Hardware.

Previously: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU
Nvidia Refreshes RTX 2000-Series GPUs With "Super" Branding


Original Submission

Related Stories

AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced 20 comments

At Computex 2019 in Taipei, AMD CEO Lisa Su gave a keynote presentation announcing the first "7nm" Navi GPU and Ryzen 3000-series CPUs. All of the products will support PCI Express 4.0.

Contrary to recent reports, AMD says that the Navi microarchitecture is not based on Graphics Core Next (GCN), but rather a new "RDNA" macroarchitecture ('R' for Radeon), although the extent of the difference is not clear. There is also no conflict with Nvidia's naming scheme; the 5000-series naming is a reference to the company's 50th anniversary.

AMD claims that Navi GPUs will have 25% better performance/clock and 50% better performance/Watt vs. Vega GPUs. AMD Radeon RX 5700 is the first "7nm" Navi GPU to be announced. It was compared with Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2070, with the RX 5700 outperforming the RTX 2070 by 10% in the AMD-favorable game Strange Brigade. Pricing and other launch details will be revealed on June 10.

AMD also announced the first five Ryzen 3000-series CPUs, all of which will be released on July 7:

CPUCores / ThreadsFrequencyTDPPrice
Ryzen 9 3900X12 / 243.8 - 4.6 GHz105 W$499
Ryzen 7 3800X8 / 163.9 - 4.5 GHz105 W$399
Ryzen 7 3700X8 / 163.6 - 4.4 GHz65 W$329
Ryzen 5 3600X6 / 123.8 - 4.4 GHz95 W$249
Ryzen 5 36006 / 123.6 - 4.2 GHz65 W$199

The Ryzen 9 3900X is the only CPU in the list using two core chiplets, each with 6 of 8 cores enabled. AMD has held back on releasing a 16-core monster for now. AMD compared the Ryzen 9 3900X to the $1,189 Intel Core i9-9920X, the Ryzen 7 3800X to the $499 Intel Core i9-9900K, and the Ryzen 7 3700X to the Intel Core i7-9700K, with the AMD chips outperforming the Intel chips in certain single and multi-threaded benchmarks (wait for the reviews before drawing any definitive conclusions). All five of the processors will come with a bundled cooler, as seen in this list.

AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU 30 comments

At AMD's keynote at the 2019 Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3), AMD CEO Lisa Su announced three new "7nm" Navi GPUs and a new CPU.

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT will have 2560 stream processors (40 compute units) capable of 9.75 TFLOPs of FP32 performance, with 8 GB of 14 Gbps GDDR6 VRAM. The price is $449. The AMD RX 5700 cuts that down to 2304 SPs (36 CUs), 7.9 TFLOPs, at $379. There is a higher clocked "50th anniversary" version of the 5700 XT that offers up to 10.14 teraflops for $499. A teraflop on one of these new cards supposedly means better graphics performance than older Polaris-based GPUs:

Looking at these clockspeed values then, in terms of raw throughput the new card is expected to get between 9 TFLOPs and 9.75 TFLOPs of FP32 compute/shading throughput. This is a decent jump over the Polaris cards, but on the surface it doesn't look like a huge, generational jump, and this is where AMD's RDNA architecture comes in. AMD has made numerous optimizations to improve their GPU utilization – that is, how well they put those FLOPs to good use – so a teraflop on a 5700 card means more than it does on preceding AMD cards. Overall, AMD says that they're getting around 25% more work done per clock on the whole in gaming workloads. So raw specs can be deceiving.

The GPUs do not include real-time raytracing or variable rate pixel shading support. These may appear on a future generation of GPUs. Instead, AMD talked about support for DisplayPort 1.4 with Display Stream Compression, a contrast-enhancing post-processing filter, AMD Radeon Image Sharpening, and a Radeon Anti-lag feature to reduce input lag.

Towards the end of the presentation, AMD revealed the 16-core Ryzen 9 3950X, the company's fully-fledged Ryzen CPU with two 8-core "7nm" Zen 2 chiplets. Compared to the 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X CPU, the 3950X has a slightly higher boost clock and L2 cache, with the same 105 Watt TDP, for $749. This is the full lineup so far:

CPUCores / ThreadsFrequencyTDPPrice
Ryzen 9 3950X16 / 323.5 - 4.7 GHz105 W$749
Ryzen 9 3900X12 / 243.8 - 4.6 GHz105 W$499
Ryzen 7 3800X8 / 163.9 - 4.5 GHz105 W$399
Ryzen 7 3700X8 / 163.6 - 4.4 GHz65 W$329
Ryzen 5 3600X6 / 123.8 - 4.4 GHz95 W$249
Ryzen 5 36006 / 123.6 - 4.2 GHz65 W$199

Previously: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced


Original Submission

Nvidia Refreshes RTX 2000-Series GPUs With "Super" Branding 9 comments

The GeForce RTX 2070 Super & RTX 2060 Super Review: Smaller Numbers, Bigger Performance

NVIDIA is launching a mid-generation kicker for their mid-to-high-end video card lineup in the form of their GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards. Based on the same family of Turing GPUs as the original GeForce RTX 20 series cards, these new Super cards – all suffixed Super, appropriately enough – come with new configurations and new clockspeeds. They are, essentially, NVIDIA's 2019 card family for the $399+ video card market.

When they are released on July 9th, the GeForce RTX 20 series Super cards are going to be sharing store shelves with the rest of the GeForce RTX 20 series cards. Some cards like the RTX 2080 and RTX 2070 are set to go away, while other cards like the RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2060 will remain on the market as-is. In practice, it's probably best to think of the new cards as NVIDIA executing as either a price cut or a spec bump – depending on if you see the glass as half-empty or half-full – all without meaningfully changing their price tiers.

In terms of performance, the RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 Super cards aren't going to bring anything new to the table. In fact if we're being blunt, the RTX 2070 Super is basically a slightly slower RTX 2080, and the RTX 2060 Super may as well be the RTX 2070. So instead, what has changed is the price that these performance levels are available at, and ultimately the performance-per-dollar ratios in parts of NVIDIA's lineup. The performance of NVIDIA's former $699 and $499 cards will now be available for $499 and $399, respectively. This leaves the vanilla RTX 2060 to hold the line at $349, and the upcoming RTX 2080 Super to fill the $699 spot. Which means if you're in the $400-$700 market for video cards, your options are about to get noticeably faster.

Also at Tom's Hardware, The Verge, and Ars Technica.

Previously: Nvidia Announces RTX 2080 Ti, 2080, and 2070 GPUs, Claims 25x Increase in Ray-Tracing Performance
Nvidia Announces RTX 2060 GPU
AMD and Nvidia's Latest GPUs Are Expensive and Unappealing

Related: AMD and Intel at Computex 2019: First Ryzen 3000-Series CPUs and Navi GPU Announced
AMD Details Three Navi GPUs and First Mainstream 16-Core CPU


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday July 06 2019, @03:30AM

    by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Saturday July 06 2019, @03:30AM (#863728) Journal

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/14616/amd-adjusts-launch-price-of-radeon-rx-5700-series-50-for-anniversary-xt-20-for-regular [anandtech.com]

    The move isn’t unprecedented, but is something extremely rare. What is interesting is that AMD’s Scott Herkelman (CVP & GM AMD Radeon) yesterday posted an interesting but short tweet:

    Jebaited

    — Scott Herkelman (@sherkelman) July 4, 2019

    Scott's snarky tweet is suggesting AMD had planned the move all along- playing a bait & switch in terms of the pricing of the RX 5700, most likely in preparation and in response to Nvidia’s newest Super card line-up.

    Should be even cheaper though. AMD can't play with Nvidia the way they are doing with Intel.

    --
    [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 2) by bzipitidoo on Saturday July 06 2019, @05:56AM (3 children)

    by bzipitidoo (4388) Subscriber Badge on Saturday July 06 2019, @05:56AM (#863767) Journal

    The market for new, high end video cards must be very small. It doesn't seem a value proposition to spend the price of a decent laptop on just a video card, no matter how fast it is.

    The Radeon Pro V340 is the only expensive graphics card I find somewhat interesting, as it's reportedly the only one that has this new MxGPU virtualization.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday July 06 2019, @06:11AM (2 children)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Saturday July 06 2019, @06:11AM (#863770) Journal

      https://www.anandtech.com/show/14360/nvidia-q1-fy-2020-earnings-report-postcrypto-reset [anandtech.com] (see NVIDIA Quarterly Revenue Comparison)

      The discrete gaming GPU market is better than you might expect. Which explains why Intel is jumping into it with GPUs for gamers (although they are also aiming for supercomputers, datacenters, and machine learning, replacing the defunct Xeon Phi line).

      4K and above resolutions still need plenty of performance. Real-time ray tracing is in its infancy but will become a standard technique within a few years. VR needs all the performance it can get if it is ultimately moving towards 16K resolution @ 240+ Hz (but much less demanding with foveated rendering). Come to think of it, maybe someone should do monitor-based foveated rendering that tracks your eye movement and real-time position in relation to the screen. Then we can get big results out of the $99 GPU.

      BTW, people are overpaying for laptops. Here's one [anandtech.com] that costs more than an RTX 2080 Ti with the base spec configuration.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by EEMac on Saturday July 06 2019, @03:32PM (1 child)

        by EEMac (6423) on Saturday July 06 2019, @03:32PM (#863834)

        BTW, people are overpaying for laptops.

        People are overpaying for fashion accessories. They are buying to signal wealth or taste more than function.

        There's the weirdest divide in modern society based on how your computer hardware is distributed between the keyboard and screen.

        If your fit everything behind the screen and make the keyboard a thin flap, you're modern and forward-thinking and people love you. If your computer is a little too thick under the keyboard, you're a backwards holdout and a relic of an earlier age. (I've actually heard marketing types gripe about this.) I've never seen so much angst, so much money spent, and so much performance avoided, for a literal few millimeters either way.

        How I feel about the whole thing: https://knowyourmeme.com/memes/i-dont-want-to-live-on-this-planet-anymore%20/ [knowyourmeme.com]

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