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posted by martyb on Saturday November 05 2016, @06:31PM   Printer-friendly
from the YOU-are-the-product dept.

Windows 10 is now serving Edge advertisements to anyone that does not have it as the default browser.

These ads appear over the Edge icon in the Windows 10 taskbar, even when Edge is not open. They do appear only when Edge is not the default system browser but that covers the majority of Windows 10 systems.

Since it advertises Microsoft Edge and Microsoft Rewards, it is possible that the campaign is reserved to the United States. The reason for this is simple: Microsoft Rewards are only available in the US right now.

This is not the only ad that promotes Microsoft Edge that users may see however. Microsoft is pushing ads in the Action Center as well stating that Chrome is draining battery fast and that switching to Edge would better the situation.

Both ads have some use for users and try to promote a feature of Microsoft Edge or Microsoft that may be beneficial to users.

One could argue that this is a good thing, and it probably would not get such a bad reception if Microsoft would provide clear and concise options to turn of[f] these after they appear once.

The main issue that many Windows 10 users may have with these ads is however that is seems impossible to get rid of those advertisements once and for all.

Microsoft really wants Windows 10 users to use Cortana and Edge.


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  • (Score: 3, Informative) by Celestial on Saturday November 05 2016, @07:49PM

    by Celestial (4891) on Saturday November 05 2016, @07:49PM (#422906) Journal

    Back around 2002 - 2005, I used to triple boot between Libranet Linux, Mandrake Linux, and Windows 2000 Professional. However, in 2005, I began playing a MMORPG video game that (at least at the time), did not work in WINE. I played that game almost every day for years, so I just deleted the Linux partitions and stuck with Windows. The MMORPG video game shut down several years later, but I've stuck with Windows for four reasons.

    1. Out of habit.

    2. A few of the video games I play today don't have Linux versions.

    3. Libranet Linux and Mandrake Linux no longer exist. I've kept tabs on Mageia Linux which is the successor to Mandrake and Mandriva Linux, but it seems to be stuck in development Hell as there has been no new version in a year and a half now, and the ETA for the new version keeps being pushed back.

    4. It's been eleven years. What little Linux knowledge I had is a bit rusty to say the least and most likely no longer even largely applicable.

    But it's obvious that Microsoft Windows is now a dead end where it uses the user and not the other way around. Windows 10 just seems to keep getting worse instead of better. I've read good things about Korora Linux (based on Fedora Linux), may have to give that a try.

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  • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday November 05 2016, @08:15PM

    by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Saturday November 05 2016, @08:15PM (#422916) Homepage

    The only reason why I stopped dual-booting and went Windoze only was because a lot of bullshit in my Computer Science program (with the exception of Intro to Operating Systems class) required Windows crap. Having to work most of the time and then go home and do schoolwork, I was too tired to fuck around with VMs and WINE and too cheap to buy new hardware. Plus, all of the good, um "available at no cost" applications run on Windows.

    Soon I'll buy some new hardware and get ready to re-embrace Linux, but now I'm trying to decide which distro to run - Ubuntu used to be great but now it's pozzed with AIDS, and the Mint that everybody recommends choked catastrophically during its install when I last tried it fairly recently, and I tend not to allow such major failures second chances. Maybe Debian?

    • (Score: 4, Informative) by https on Saturday November 05 2016, @11:19PM

      by https (5248) on Saturday November 05 2016, @11:19PM (#422944)

      If your study program required Windows, it wasn't computer science they were teaching.

      --
      Offended and laughing about it.
      • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Sunday November 06 2016, @12:27AM

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Sunday November 06 2016, @12:27AM (#422956) Homepage

        Yup, I'm well aware of that, but I'm only about the piece of paper that's from something a little better than Stockton Upstairs University of Suite B. I'd be more than happy to actually learn real math when I no longer have to work for a living.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 06 2016, @01:36AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 06 2016, @01:36AM (#422974)

        So the 'your not a true scottsman' argument? You really only can properly learn programming only on open source? /sarc

    • (Score: 3, Informative) by HiThere on Saturday November 05 2016, @11:47PM

      by HiThere (866) on Saturday November 05 2016, @11:47PM (#422949) Journal

      Debian is what I've used for over a decade, but Red Hat and SuSE also have strong adherents. In my mind the argument for Red Hat is basically "systemd came out of there, so they're going to ensure it works well on their system". (I'm still pissed off about systemd, and wish Debian hadn't adopted it, but it's become nearly generic, and I'm told that future versions of KDE and other applications will just assume that it's present. And I don't like to fight city hall.

      There are, of course, lots of distributions that claim to be good, and I don't have recent knowledge with most of them. IIRC PCLinux is supposed to be especially friendly to people used to MSWind, but I've never used it.

      The two most common Linux system bases are Debian and Red Hat. I've never had a problem with a simple install of Debian stable. My experience with Red Hat was also pretty good, but it's now over a decade old. Hope that helps.

      --
      Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
    • (Score: 2) by Marand on Sunday November 06 2016, @03:11AM

      by Marand (1081) on Sunday November 06 2016, @03:11AM (#423002) Journal

      I'm trying to decide which distro to run - Ubuntu used to be great but now it's pozzed with AIDS, and the Mint that everybody recommends choked catastrophically during its install when I last tried it fairly recently, and I tend not to allow such major failures second chances. Maybe Debian?

      Ubuntu used to add a lot of value over Debian in usability, but it's not nearly as true these days unless you just happen to like Unity for some reason. Debian's still a good choice, though; rock-solid stability, updating to new versions is smooth, and you can still ditch systemd if you want unlike a lot of current distros. Just don't forget to enable the contrib and non-free repos, they're disabled by default but often needed for things like firmware or GPU drivers.

      The big negative to Debian is the upgrade cycle is slower. Which honestly isn't a negative itself, but with everyone else constantly chasing the latest versions of everything, it can get annoying toward the end of a stable version's life. The usual ways of mitigating that are to use the backports repository and third-party repos for specific software. Lately, though, I've started using Nix [nixos.org] for things I need newer versions of (or things that aren't in Debian's repos), along with AppImages for a couple things (Krita) and it works well.

      I used to follow Debian's testing repo, using it like a rolling release, but that isn't as big a deal as it used to be. I realised that for most of my software, I don't care if it's on the latest bleeding-edge version, so an occasional AppImage or Nix package for the stuff I care about is sufficient. In fact, I prefer only getting security updates to most of it so I don't have to deal with random breakage and obscure fucking bugs every few weeks.

      So, that's my suggestion: Debian stable + Nix.

      Also, I'm not familiar enough with it to say whether it's good to use or not, but if you like KDE you might be interested in trying OpenSUSE. I recall it being a decent KDE-based distro in the past, it just didn't have anything compelling enough to pull me away from Debian.

    • (Score: 2) by ragequit on Sunday November 06 2016, @09:07PM

      by ragequit (44) on Sunday November 06 2016, @09:07PM (#423263) Journal

      When I need need linux (for the 5% of stuff I haven't ported to OSX (like rpcclient)), I trust Slackware.

      Runs beautifully in or out of a VM, no systemd (unless you are into that sort of thing)

      --
      The above views are fabricated for your reading pleasure.
  • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 06 2016, @05:55AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 06 2016, @05:55AM (#423032)

    It's been eleven years

    Some folks find RoboLinux to be just the ticket when they can't break free from Windoze apps. [google.com]

    ...because of its VM. [google.com]

    "One of the project's more interesting features is the availability of a pre-configured virtual machine support pack with Windows XP or Windows 7--a VirtualBox setup which allows the user to install and run the Windows operating system seamlessly alongside Robolinux. This is an optional add-on that must be purchased from the project's online store."
    ...and they just released a fresh spin says DistroWatch. [distrowatch.com]

    -- OriginalOwner_ [soylentnews.org]