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posted by martyb on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:23PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the hollow-holo-promises dept.

Microsoft Significantly Misrepresented HoloLens 2's Field of View at Reveal

To significant anticipation, Microsoft revealed HoloLens 2 earlier this week at MWC 2019. By all accounts it looks like a beautiful and functional piece of technology and a big step forward for Microsoft's AR initiative. All of which makes it unfortunate that the company didn't strive to be clearer when illustrating one of the three key areas in which the headset is said to be improved over its predecessor. [...] For field of view—how much of your view is covered by the headset's display—[Alex] Kipman said that HoloLens 2 delivers "more than double" the field of view of the original HoloLens.

Within the AR and VR markets, the de facto descriptor used when talking about a headset's field of view is an angle specified to be the horizontal, vertical, or diagonal extent of the device's display from the perspective of the viewer. When I hear that one headset has "more than double" the field of view of another, it says to me that one of those angles has increased by a factor of ~2. It isn't perfect by any means, but it's how the industry has come to define field of view.

It turns out that's not what Kipman meant when he said "more than double." I reached out to Microsoft for clarity and found that what he was actually referring to was not a field of view angle, rather the field of view area, but that wasn't explained in the presentation at all, just (seemingly intentionally) vague statements of "more than twice the field of view."

[...] But then Kipman moved onto a part of the presentation which visually showed the difference between the field of view of HoloLens 1 and HoloLens 2, and that's when things really became misleading.

Microsoft chief defends controversial military HoloLens contract

Microsoft employees objecting to a US Army HoloLens contract aren't likely to get many concessions from their company's leadership. CEO Satya Nadella has defended the deal in a CNN interview, arguing that Microsoft made a "principled decision" not to deny technology to "institutions that we have elected in democracies to protect the freedoms we enjoy." The exec also asserted that Microsoft was "very transparent" when securing the contract and would "continue to have that dialogue" with staff.

Also at UploadVR, Ars Technica, and The Hill.

See also: Stick to Your Guns, Microsoft

Previously: U.S. Army Awards Microsoft a $480 Million HoloLens Contract
Microsoft Announces $3,500 HoloLens 2 With Wider Field of View and Other Improvements

Related: Google Drafting Ethics Policy for its Involvement in Military Projects
Google Will Not Continue Project Maven After Contract Expires in 2019


Original Submission

Related Stories

Google Drafting Ethics Policy for its Involvement in Military Projects 26 comments

Google promises ethical principles to guide development of military AI

Google is drawing up a set of guidelines that will steer its involvement in developing AI tools for the military, according to a report from The New York Times. What exactly these guidelines will stipulate isn't clear, but Google says they will include a ban on the use of artificial intelligence in weaponry. The principles are expected to be announced in full in the coming weeks. They are a response to the controversy over the company's decision to develop AI tools for the Pentagon that analyze drone surveillance footage.

[...] But the question facing these employees (and Google itself) is: where do you draw the line? Does using machine learning to analyze surveillance footage for the military count as "weaponized AI"? Probably not. But what if that analysis informs future decisions about drone strikes? Does it matter then? How would Google even know if this had happened?

Also at VentureBeat and Engadget.

Previously: Google vs Maven
Google Employees on Pentagon AI Algorithms: "Google Should Not be in the Business of War"
About a Dozen Google Employees Have Resigned Over Project Maven


Original Submission

Google Will Not Continue Project Maven After Contract Expires in 2019 19 comments

We have recently covered the fact that some Google employees had resigned because of the company's involvement in an AI-related weapons project called Maven. Many thought that the resignations, whilst being a noble gesture, would amount to nothing - but we were wrong...

Leaked Emails Show Google Expected Lucrative Military Drone AI Work To Grow Exponentially

Google has sought to quash the internal dissent in conversations with employees. Diane Greene, the chief executive of Google’s cloud business unit, speaking at a company town hall meeting following the revelations, claimed that the contract was “only” for $9 million, according to the New York Times, a relatively minor project for such a large company.

Internal company emails obtained by The Intercept tell a different story. The September emails show that Google’s business development arm expected the military drone artificial intelligence revenue to ramp up from an initial $15 million to an eventual $250 million per year.

In fact, one month after news of the contract broke, the Pentagon allocated an additional $100 million to Project Maven.

The internal Google email chain also notes that several big tech players competed to win the Project Maven contract. Other tech firms such as Amazon were in the running, one Google executive involved in negotiations wrote. (Amazon did not respond to a request for comment.) Rather than serving solely as a minor experiment for the military, Google executives on the thread stated that Project Maven was “directly related” to a major cloud computing contract worth billions of dollars that other Silicon Valley firms are competing to win.

However, Google has had a major rethink.

U.S. Army Awards Microsoft a $480 Million HoloLens Contract 10 comments

US Army awards Microsoft with $480 million HoloLens contract

The US Army has awarded Microsoft a $480 million contract to supply the military branch with as many as 100,000 HoloLens augmented reality headsets for training and combat purposes, according to Bloomberg.

Microsoft beat out other leading augmented reality headset companies, like Magic Leap, which announced that it would be joining the bidding process back in September. Microsoft has had the upper hand, focusing primarily on enterprise markets, unlike Magic Leap, which has focused on the barely-existent consumer market. Microsoft has also previously sold some headsets to the military. But this contract would go well beyond its earlier collaboration, and could greatly expand the reach of the headset.

[...] According to Bloomberg, the military-grade headsets would vary extensively from the existing HoloLens design. They would include thermal sensing and night vision and be used in both training and on the battlefield. Microsoft would be expected to provide at least 2,500 units of the headset to the military branch within the next two years.


Original Submission

Microsoft Announces $3,500 HoloLens 2 With Wider Field of View and Other Improvements 5 comments

Microsoft Reveals HoloLens 2 with More than 2x Field of View & 47 Pixels per-Degree

Microsoft today revealed HoloLens 2 at MWC 2019 in Barcelona. The headset features a laser-scanning display which brings a field of view that's more than 2x the original HoloLens and 47 pixels per degree.

HoloLens visionary Alex Kipman took to the stage in Barcelona to introduce HoloLens 2 which addresses many of the key criticisms of the original headset: field of view, comfort, and hand-tracking.

Kipman says that HoloLens 2 "more than doubles" the field of view of the original HoloLens, though hasn't yet specified exactly what the field of view is. The original HoloLens field of view was around 35 degrees, so HoloLens 2 is expected to be around 70 degrees.

[...] HoloLens 2 is also designed to be more comfortable, with much of the headset's bulk balanced in the back of the headset. Kipman said HoloLens 2 "more than triples the comfort" over the original HoloLens... though the exact weight, and how they came to that specific figure, is unclear. Still, the front portion of the headset is said to be made entirely from carbon fiber to cut down on weight and offers a convenient flip-up visor.

HoloLens 2 also brings hand-tracking which goes much further than the coarse gesture control in the original headset. Now with full hand-tracking, users can interact much more directly with applications by touching, poking, and sliding controls directly rather than using abstract gestures.

Also at Engadget.

See also: HoloLens 2 Specs Reveal 2–3 Hour 'Active' Battery Life, Optional Top Strap, & More
Mozilla is bringing Firefox to Microsoft's HoloLens 2

Previously: HoloLens - Microsoft's Augmented Reality Product
Microsoft Giving $500,000 to Academia to Develop HoloLens Apps
Microsoft Announces Surface Pro 4, Surface Book, and HoloLens Dev Edition
Microsoft HoloLens and its 24-Core Chip
HoloLens 2 to Include Machine Learning Accelerated Hardware
Ford Using Microsoft HoloLens to Help Design Cars
Leaked Microsoft Documents Describe Plans for Surface Tablets, Xbox, "Andromeda", and HoloLens
HoloLens to Assist Surgeons at UK's Alder Hey Children's Hospital
U.S. Army Awards Microsoft a $480 Million HoloLens Contract


Original Submission

Microsoft's HoloLens 3 Reportedly Cancelled 5 comments

HoloLens 3 isn't happening and metaverse tie-in strategy is unclear, says report

Microsoft has done a lot with HoloLens and its successor, HoloLens 2, in the time both products have been available to the public. However, even with the line's accomplishments, a HoloLens 3 may not be in the cards.

According to a report by Business Insider, HoloLens 3 has been scrapped by Microsoft and the HoloLens team is trapped in a state of perpetual confusion and uncertainty over what the long-term goals of existing plans are. As a result, teammates are leaving Microsoft to pursue augmented reality positions at rival companies such as Meta, a development that was documented before this report.

Some of the HoloLens team believe the focus should remain on hardware innovation efforts, like has been seen with the U.S. Army's IVAS contract, which holds the potential to net Microsoft up to $22 billion in exchange for its delivery of soldier-attuned HoloLens variants. That project has been delayed, reportedly because Microsoft has been thus far unable to produce a combat-ready device.

Also at PCWorld and Engadget.

See also: Microsoft's HoloLens 3 's--t show' proves it still doesn't understand the consumer market

Previously: U.S. Army Awards Microsoft a $480 Million HoloLens Contract
Microsoft Announces $3,500 HoloLens 2 With Wider Field of View and Other Improvements
Microsoft Misrepresented HoloLens 2 Field of View, Faces Backlash for Military Contract
U.S. Army Shows Off Demo of HoloLens 2 System


Original Submission

U.S. Army Shows Off Demo of HoloLens 2 System 18 comments

US Army shows how it will use HoloLens in the field

When Microsoft employees balked at the company's $479 million HoloLens contract with the US Army, it raised a question: just what would this system look like? You now have a better idea. The Army has given CNBC an early demo of its Integrated Visual Augmentation System, which uses a modified HoloLens 2 to provide both combat assistance and training. It reportedly feels like a "real-life game of Call of Duty" -- you can see your squad's positions on a map, a compass, and even your weapon's reticle. Thermal imaging would help you see in the dark without as much of a telltale glow as existing night vision headsets.

Previously: U.S. Army Awards Microsoft a $480 Million HoloLens Contract
Microsoft Announces $3,500 HoloLens 2 With Wider Field of View and Other Improvements
Microsoft Misrepresented HoloLens 2 Field of View, Faces Backlash for Military Contract


Original Submission

Is Ethical A.I. Even Possible? 35 comments

Is Ethical A.I. Even Possible?

When a news article revealed that Clarifai was working with the Pentagon and some employees questioned the ethics of building artificial intelligence that analyzed video captured by drones, the company said the project would save the lives of civilians and soldiers.

"Clarifai's mission is to accelerate the progress of humanity with continually improving A.I.," read a blog post from Matt Zeiler, the company's founder and chief executive, and a prominent A.I. researcher. Later, in a news media interview, Mr. Zeiler announced a new management position that would ensure all company projects were ethically sound.

As activists, researchers, and journalists voice concerns over the rise of artificial intelligence, warning against biased, deceptive and malicious applications, the companies building this technology are responding. From tech giants like Google and Microsoft to scrappy A.I. start-ups, many are creating corporate principles meant to ensure their systems are designed and deployed in an ethical way. Some set up ethics officers or review boards to oversee these principles.

But tensions continue to rise as some question whether these promises will ultimately be kept. Companies can change course. Idealism can bow to financial pressure. Some activists — and even some companies — are beginning to argue that the only way to ensure ethical practices is through government regulation.

"We don't want to see a commercial race to the bottom," Brad Smith, Microsoft's president and chief legal officer, said at the New Work Summit in Half Moon Bay, Calif., hosted last week by The New York Times. "Law is needed."

Possible != Probable. And the "needed law" could come in the form of a ban and/or surveillance of coding and hardware-building activities.

Related:


Original Submission

Pentagon Brass Bafflingly Accuses Google of Providing "Direct Benefit" to China's Military 37 comments

Submitted via IRC for soysheep9857

There are many reasons to be critical of Google. But on Thursday, General Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stopped just short of accusing the tech giant of treason.

Dunford's incendiary comments came during a budgetary hearing by the Senate Armed Services Committee this afternoon. During his time for questioning, freshman Senator Josh Hawley, a Republican, turned to the subject of Google's decision to back away from projects with the Pentagon. Hawley asked the panel if he understood the situation correctly and that the men were saying, "that Google, an American company, supposedly, is refusing to work with the Department of Defense, but is doing work with China, in China, in a way that at least indirectly benefits the Chinese government."

Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan tempered that assertion, explaining that he hasn't heard anyone use the word "refuse," but that Google has shown "a lack of willingness to support DOD programs."

But General Dunford was more open to going on the attack. When given the chance to elaborate on his concerns, he told Senator Hawley:

You know, senator, I'm nodding my head on exactly the point that you made: that the work that Google is doing in China is indirectly benefitting the Chinese military. And I've been very public on this issue as well; in fact, the way I described it to our industry partners is, 'look we're the good guys in the values that we represent and the system that we represent is the one that will allow and has allowed you to thrive,' and that's the way I've characterized it. I was just nodding that what the secretary was articulating is the general sense of all of us as leaders. We watch with great concern when industry partners work in China knowing there is that indirect benefit, and frankly 'indirect' may be not a full characterization of the way it really is. It's more of a direct benefit to the Chinese military.

Source: https://gizmodo.com/pentagon-brass-bafflingly-accuses-google-of-providing-d-1833302885

Related: Google Employees on Pentagon AI Algorithms: "Google Should Not be in the Business of War"
About a Dozen Google Employees Have Resigned Over Project Maven
Google Drafting Ethics Policy for its Involvement in Military Projects
Google Will Not Continue Project Maven After Contract Expires in 2019
Microsoft Misrepresented HoloLens 2 Field of View, Faces Backlash for Military Contract


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:34PM (5 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:34PM (#807862)

    "institutions that we have elected in democracies to protect the freedoms we enjoy."

    I don't recall voting for mass surveillance and broken security. I DO recall political power grabs and blame shifting.

    I think it is time we improved elections. At the very least we can adopt ranked choice and punish election fraud severely so that we actually do have true democracy. After that I think we need a better method of providing feedback for what the actual people want. Not direct democracy, but certainly closer to that than the shitshow we've got right now.

    • (Score: 0, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (2 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (#807866)

      Elections are broken. It's time we move on to something better. Maybe alternating so Republicans are in power for 4 years at a time, then Democrats get two weeks.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:43PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:43PM (#807872)

        CrookedHillary could do a lot of damage in two weeks.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:54AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:54AM (#807908)

        ha!

        troll thinks the "shitshow" was referring to the GOP and responds as trolls so often do, what idiots

    • (Score: 2) by arslan on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:35AM

      by arslan (3462) on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:35AM (#807900)

      Next up from Microsoft, an AR tool that will augment reality so you get the election you want!

      * Terms and conditions apply, please read the fine print. Augmented reality does not guarantee events in actual reality. Microsoft holds the right to deny your augmented reality as well as your actual reality.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:06AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:06AM (#807996)

      I don't recall voting for mass surveillance and broken security.

      Well you did! Every time you reelect 95% of your goddamn crooked congress! Every two years you squander the opportunity to completely clean out the House, so FUCK ALL Y'ALL! Blame shifting indeed!

  • (Score: 1) by liberza on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:35PM (1 child)

    by liberza (6137) on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:35PM (#807863)

    Doesn't the Army probably use Window$ too?

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Freeman on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:43PM

      by Freeman (732) on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:43PM (#807874) Journal

      Guaranteed. This is an issue of design/purpose. There's a difference between creating a general purpose tool that the Army also happens to use to kill people with (General purpose OS or Screwdrivers) and designing a tool specifically for that purpose (HUD for combat soldiers or Missiles).

      --
      Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
  • (Score: 4, Informative) by Freeman on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (2 children)

    by Freeman (732) on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (#807865) Journal

    That's why you don't listen to the marketing speak. Go for the real information in the technical specifications. In the event you have no clue what the difference is between ghz, mhz, and h2o. I would recommend, talking with someone who has a clue.

    --
    Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:49AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:49AM (#808007)

      That's why you don't listen to the marketing speak. Go for the real information in the technical specifications.

      The technical experts rarely make the final decision. It's the ignorant and ego-driven brass who does, and salespeople know how to play their emotions & ignorance like a Stradivarius.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday February 28 2019, @03:20PM

        by Freeman (732) on Thursday February 28 2019, @03:20PM (#808146) Journal

        Microsoft misrepresenting the field of view specs in their promotional material has nothing to do with the military contract. The editor just smashed two stories about the same thing into one. The backlash for the military contract is coming from Microsoft personnel who don't like the idea of working on a project for the Army.

        --
        Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
  • (Score: 2) by aristarchus on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (8 children)

    by aristarchus (2645) on Wednesday February 27 2019, @11:38PM (#807867) Journal

    Kinda Ender's the Game for Microsoft, does it not?

    (I can't move to Linux because of games I have to kill people! )

    • (Score: 4, Touché) by c0lo on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:46AM (7 children)

      by c0lo (156) on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:46AM (#807947) Journal

      'Speaker for BSoD' was inspiring too.

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @09:05AM (6 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @09:05AM (#808033)

        I had no idea there was a sequel? Mormons in Space, in the Space Force , for the Heavenly Father/abuser! OMG, do they let black folk into their fucked up religion? Have the apologized for not having done so yet? I Imagine Dragons, but they are all up in Brigham Young's intestinal tract, what with I thought it was only OK to have gay sex with the elect, not just some guy you met while on Missionary! This changes everything! [google.com]

        Does Pence know about this? Does the Donald have even a clue, or did he leave this to Mikael Cohen? When the Constitution hangs by a thread, a Mormon named Mitt will have to ride in on a White Horse, and, well, not get elected. My gawd, Mormons are Morons! The Angel Moroni, tried to tell them, in their own alleged holey book. How much more obvious do you have to be? "Hello, idiots, I am the Angel Moroni, and I have some gold plates that can only be read by that man over there with a Stone and a Hat. It is kind of like havingt 8" Floppies. You are at the mercy of those with the hardware.

        And, you have to trust their output, since you have no hash function to verify their claim that Brigham should have 24 wives. Oh, how the stupid have fallen! And made to live in Utah? Oh, poor devils! Poor idiots! Poor, well, poors.
         

        • (Score: 4, Insightful) by c0lo on Thursday February 28 2019, @11:06AM (5 children)

          by c0lo (156) on Thursday February 28 2019, @11:06AM (#808054) Journal

          Oh, fuck off.
          I don't care what axe you have to grind for Card, I find his books as quite enjoyable reeds.

          --
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
          • (Score: 2) by takyon on Thursday February 28 2019, @05:33PM

            by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Thursday February 28 2019, @05:33PM (#808210) Journal

            It's too late! You're a Card-carrying member of the Alt-Right now!

            --
            [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
          • (Score: 3, Touché) by TrentDavey on Thursday February 28 2019, @07:02PM (3 children)

            by TrentDavey (1526) Subscriber Badge on Thursday February 28 2019, @07:02PM (#808274)

            ... so you cut them up and use them in your saxophone or oboe? Interesting.

            • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Thursday February 28 2019, @09:42PM (2 children)

              by c0lo (156) on Thursday February 28 2019, @09:42PM (#808384) Journal

              Subtle, very subtle. So subtle I couldn't detect any meaning. Does your comment carry one?

              --
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
              • (Score: 3, Informative) by aristarchus on Friday March 01 2019, @08:48AM (1 child)

                by aristarchus (2645) on Friday March 01 2019, @08:48AM (#808603) Journal

                Way out in the Thules, or, a marsh? Billibong?

                quite enjoyable reeds.

                Or were you only objecting to the quotidian take-off on a simple typo?

                • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Friday March 01 2019, @08:58AM

                  by c0lo (156) on Friday March 01 2019, @08:58AM (#808604) Journal

                  Beat me if I noticed the typo.

                  --
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
  • (Score: 0, Touché) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:15AM (7 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:15AM (#807890)

    It is weird how Microsoft and Amazon have strangely become the most ethical large tech companies. I would not have expected that twenty years ago. It's not that their ethical conduct is especially good, but everyone else's moral compass is pointing straight down.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:17AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:17AM (#807892)

      If your moral compass is pointing straight down, it is a Plumb Bob, and you probably got it from Bob Jones Plum University. Or, it's your dick.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM (#807897)

        It's probably both.

    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by takyon on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM (#807896) Journal

      Is Microsoft defined by its leadership or by its rank-and-file developers? Because if you read TFS you'll find that the CEO wants to do business with the U.S. Army, it's just the lowly devs that are objecting to it. Similar story at Google with Project Maven.

      These companies could fire their whiny devs, or just create some subsidiary or joint venture to handle the autonomous killer robot work. To be conducted with zero fanfare.

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:47AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:47AM (#807904)

      It's employee's market [blackamericaweb.com] now. As result, those employees have power [forbes.com]. That's all.

      • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:55AM

        by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:55AM (#807952) Homepage Journal

        That this particular employee - or rather, contract programmer - did _not_ have power during the Dot-Com Crash led to my first, very early and purely _private_ experiments with what ultimately turned out to be Soggy Jobs.

        There is one respect in which AC's gripes are valid, in that it is incredibly difficult even for highly qualified applicants to get interviewed. This because I've read - and RSN will supply the [needed citation] - that the average job board post results in one thousand applications.

        Were I such a hiring manager, I would trim that down to a much smaller number of resumes, with the winners in this First Cut being those applicants whose first names have a prime number of letters - "Un", "Ann", "Peter" and so on.

        Among my aims for Soggy Jobs is to greatly _reduce_ that initial pile of one thousand resumes by enabling _every_ applicant to be far far more judicious in selecting which jobs to actually apply for.

        For example you could for public companies, read their financial reports. When many - not all, but _many_ job board posts are _anonymous_, the only way to determine whether you'd even want to apply is to actually go ahead at do so. Surely there is some reason?

        I am to give the power _back_ to the applicants by making it trivially easy to apply _everywhere_ you would actually want to work, to make it easier to avoid commuting by listing companies that are _not_ in Tech Hubs - Vancouver, Washington in my own case - as well as to avoid getting spammed by the body shops because you will _not_ have a profile on my site, nor will you have a resume. The _only_ way someone will find out you're looking for work is when someone actually _receives_ your resume.

        Indiegogo launch coming in... Real... Soon...

        --
        Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:41AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:41AM (#807927)

      > The military is not the enemy

      Are you sure? Nukes done away with the US's nation-level foreign threats some 50 years ago. Nuclear power-plants could have resolved US dependence on foreign oil too and saved America every single war post-WW2. What "friendly" service has the military done for you lately? Really, what positive value of the moral kind does the military-industrial complex add to your existence? Cause from over here at the sidelines, it sure looks like a boot firmly pressed against your face.

      • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday February 28 2019, @03:41PM

        by Freeman (732) on Thursday February 28 2019, @03:41PM (#808156) Journal

        Once the world really got the picture of how destructive and environmentally unfriendly Nuclear bombs actually are, they ceased to be useful in conventional wars. They exist only for MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction) reasons. They could possibly have a use in a last resort kind of situation, but generally that'd be likely to trigger a MAD situation. Nukes will do us no good in conventional warfare, because we actually want a world where we can survive. You think too much CO2 is bad for the atmosphere / environment. How about detonating a few dozen Nuclear Warheads or even just one or two?

        The military doesn't exist to make moral decisions. The military is there to win. The civilian leaders are the ones that should be making the moral decision to go to war or not. Sure, even military personnel should have some moral compass, but that moral compass is based on wanting to protect their own country. Chivalry ended a very long time ago, perhaps the last widespread act of Chivalry in war was this: https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/christmas-truce/ [snopes.com]

        --
        Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:28AM (#807895)

    IBM is still hanging around. I don't know how MS will fare.

    Monopoly is a powerful drug.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:14AM (1 child)

      by takyon (881) <reversethis-{gro ... s} {ta} {noykat}> on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:14AM (#807917) Journal

      What does that have to do with anything?

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 3, Insightful) by c0lo on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:51AM

        by c0lo (156) on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:51AM (#807949) Journal

        As the Buddhist monk once said, everything

        make me one with everything
        --
        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
  • (Score: 2) by Gaaark on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:57AM

    by Gaaark (41) Subscriber Badge on Thursday February 28 2019, @12:57AM (#807909) Journal

    Windows Professional?
    MS Plays For Sure?

    MS Bob? Shit...it didn't even kneel!

    --
    --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
  • (Score: 2) by Snotnose on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:27AM

    by Snotnose (1623) on Thursday February 28 2019, @01:27AM (#807922)

    And anyone who has followed them for, I dunno, 30, maybe 35 years, is surprised?

    Color me surprised, which in my case is pretty effiective camo.

    --
    The dishes in the sink are giving me dirty looks again.
  • (Score: 2) by MichaelDavidCrawford on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:38AM (2 children)

    by MichaelDavidCrawford (2339) Subscriber Badge <mdcrawford@gmail.com> on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:38AM (#807944) Homepage Journal

    "Field Of View" is _always_ the angular width, height or diameter, never the area.

    Nevar.

    --
    Yes I Have No Bananas. [gofundme.com]
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by RandomFactor on Thursday February 28 2019, @05:04AM (1 child)

      by RandomFactor (3682) Subscriber Badge on Thursday February 28 2019, @05:04AM (#807980) Journal

      "Yes your Honor, they asked for 'X', but we defined 'X' as 'Y' right there in the technical specifications."

      It's not our fault they made that mistake.

      --
      В «Правде» нет известий, в «Известиях» нет правды
      • (Score: 3, Touché) by Bot on Monday March 18 2019, @09:12PM

        by Bot (3902) on Monday March 18 2019, @09:12PM (#816626) Journal

        Q: How many Microsoft engineers does it take to change a light bulb?
        A: None, Bill Gates will just redefine Darkness (TM) as the new
        industry standard.

        The above joke must be older than windows 98.

        --
        Account abandoned.
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:53AM

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @02:53AM (#807951)

    Almost old enough to drink. Micro$oft have contentional relations with the Army in the movie too:

    GENERAL: What's wrong with this thing?
    It's fucking Windows 98!
    Get Bill Gates in here!
    You told us Windows 98 would be faster,
    with better access to the Internet!
    BILL GATES: It is faster. Over five million...
    (General shoots Bill Gates)

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:44AM (1 child)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday February 28 2019, @06:44AM (#808005)

    Don't you just love those people? People who think words mean what they want them to mean?

    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Thursday February 28 2019, @07:58AM

      by c0lo (156) on Thursday February 28 2019, @07:58AM (#808025) Journal

      It begs the question if the english language doesn't have a share of the blame too?

      (large grin)

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
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