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posted by martyb on Saturday September 01 2018, @04:41PM   Printer-friendly
from the very-super-hyper-mega-ultra-turbo-high-definition dept.

Sharp Announces 2nd Gen 8K UHD TVs at IFA

Sharp this week introduced its second-generation 8K ultra-high def TVs at IFA in Berlin. The new televisions use the company's new panels as well as the latest processors that can upscale Full-HD and Ultra-HD 4K content to a 7680×4320 resolution.

The initial lineup of Sharp's 2nd Gen Aquos 8K UHD TVs will include models featuring sizes of 60, 70, and 80 inches. The new televisions will be based on the company's new image processor that doubles its compute throughput over the predecessor and can upscale 2K as well as 4K content to an 8K resolution with a 100/120 Hz refresh rate.

Samsung's first 8K TV goes on sale next month

Samsung is announcing its first commercial 8K TV, the Q900R, at IFA 2018 this week. The QLED panel will be available in 65-inch, 75-inch, 82-inch, and 85-inch sizes, and is capable of peak brightness of 4,000 nits. It also supports the newer HDR10+ format backed by Samsung and Amazon.

The incredibly poor detail of 4K makes my eyes bleed; it's impossible to look at. At least now we'll have some more 8K options to tide us over until we reach 64K (61440×34560).

See also: Tech Tent: Are you ready for an 8K telly?
Samsung's 8K QLED TV looks great, but who needs it?
Toshiba Intros Its First Ever 8K TV Concept – IFA 2018

Previously: AU Optronics to Ship 8K Panels to TV Manufacturers in H1 2018

Related: Dell Announces First "Mass-Market" 8K Display
Philips Demos an 8K Monitor


Original Submission

Related Stories

Dell Announces First "Mass-Market" 8K Display 25 comments

Good news for anyone looking to overwhelm their fovea centralis with pixels: Dell has announced the first "mass-market" 8K (7680×4320) display, which will be sold for around $5,000 beginning in March:

Dell introduced the industry's first mass-market 8K display aimed at professional designers, engineers, photographers and software developers. The UP3218K will be available this March, but its rough $5,000 price tag will be rather high even for professionals dealing with content creation. That being said, $5K or so was the price that the original 4K MST monitors launched at in 2013, which perhaps makes this display price more palatable. On the other hand, right now an 8K professional display is such a niche product that the vast majority of users will have to wait a few years to see the price come down.

Up to now, 8K reference displays were available only from Canon, in very low quantities and at very high prices. The displays were primarily aimed at video professionals from TV broadcasting companies like NHK, who are working on 8K (they call it Super Hi-Vision) content to be available over-the-air in select regions of Japan next year. A number of TV makers have also announced their ultra large 8K UHDTVs, but these are hardly found in retail. Overall, Dell is the first company to offer an 8K display that can be bought online by any individual with the money and be focused on the monitor market rather than TVs.

At present, Dell is not publishing the full specifications of its UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD 8K monitor (UP3218K), but reveals key specs like resolution (7680×4320), contrast ratio (1300:1), brightness (400 nits), pixel density (280 ppi) as well as supported color spaces: 100% Adobe RGB and 100% sRGB.


Original Submission

Philips Demos an 8K Monitor 13 comments

There's competition in an overfoveated but underserved segment of the display market:

TPV Technology is demonstrating a preliminary version of its upcoming 8K ultra-high-definition display at IFA trade show in Germany. The Philips 328P8K monitor will be a part of the company's professional lineup and will hit the market sometimes next year.

Philips is the second mass-market brand to announce an 8K monitor after Dell, which has been selling its UltraSharp UP3218K for about half of a year now. The primary target audiences for the 328P8K and the UP3218K are designers, engineers, photographers and other professionals looking for maximum resolution and accurate colors. Essentially, Dell's 8K LCD is going to get a rival supporting the same resolution.

At present, TPV reveals only basic specifications of its Philips 328P8K display — 31.5" IPS panel with a 7680x4320 resolution, a 400 nits brightness (which it calls HDR 400) and presumably a 60 Hz refresh rate. When it comes to color spaces, TPV confirms that the 328P8K supports 100% of the AdobeRGB, which emphasizes that the company positions the product primarily for graphics professionals. When it comes to connectivity, everything seems to be similar to Dell's 8K monitor: the Philips 8K display will use two DP 1.3 cables in order to avoid using DP 1.4 with Display Stream Compression 1.2 and ensure a flawless and accurate image quality.

It is noteworthy that the final version of the 328P8K will be equipped with a webcam (something the current model lacks), two 3W speakers as well as USB-A and at least one USB-C port "allowing USB-C docking and simultaneous notebook charging". In order to support USB-C docking with this 8K monitor, the laptop has to support DP 1.4 alternate mode over USB-C and at present, this tech is not supported by shipping PCs. In the meantime, since in the future USB-C may be used a display output more widely, the USB-C input in the Philips 328P8K seems like a valuable future-proof feature (assuming, of course, it fully supports DP 1.4 alt mode over USB-C).

Previously: Dell Announces First "Mass-Market" 8K Display


Original Submission

AU Optronics to Ship 8K Panels to TV Manufacturers in H1 2018 21 comments

More 8K (4320p) TVs will be coming soon. AU Optronics has announced plans to ship 8K panels to TV manufacturers starting in the first half of 2018:

The lineup of panels featuring a 7680×4320 resolution will be aimed at ultra-high-end TVs and sizes will range from 65 to 85 inches, said Liao Wei-Lun, president of AUO's video products business group, at a press conference. The high-ranking executive did not disclose other specifications of the panels, such as luminance and contrast ratio, but given their positioning, it is logical to expect their characteristics to be comparable to 8K UHDTVs to be offered by LG and Samsung.

Multiple TV makers demonstrated various 8K UHDTVs at various trade shows in the recent years, but so far no one has started to sell them. Given the lack of content, it is hard to expect high demand for 8K televisions in the next couple of years, aside from the halo factor - nonetheless, AUO expects 8K panels to account for 10% of its '65-inch and above' panel shipments in 2020. The presumably high-cost of the panels would indicate that in terms of unit shipments this might still be a low-ish number. However, as with 4K displays, someone has to release 8K TVs to stimulate content providers to offer appropriate material. At this year's CES, Samsung demonstrated its Q9S, its first commercial 8K TV-set, but it did not announce its pricing or availability timeframe. LG and Sony also demonstrated their 8K TVs at CES 2018, but nothing is clear about their plans regarding these products.

[...] As for 8K displays for PCs, Dell is currently the only company to offer an 8K monitor (this one is based on a panel from LG, so the latter might introduce its own 8K display at some point). Philips last year promised to start shipments 328P8K monitor in 2018, so expect the product to hit the market in the coming months too.

Need something to watch on your 8K TV? How about the 2020 Olympics?

Also at DigiTimes.

Related: LG to Demo an 8K Resolution TV at the Consumer Electronics Show
Dell Announces First "Mass-Market" 8K Display
Philips Demos an 8K Monitor
Pimax Launches Kickstarter for "8K" Virtual Reality Headset
HDMI 2.1 Released
LG's 88-inch 8K OLED TV


Original Submission

Sharp Demos a 31.5-Inch 8K 120Hz HDR Monitor; Sony Uses Modules to Build a 783-Inch 16K Screen 11 comments

Sharp Demonstrates 31.5-Inch 8K 120Hz HDR Monitor

Sharp this week demonstrated its first 31.5-inch HDR display featuring a 7680×4320 resolution and a 120 Hz refresh rate. The monitor uses the company's IGZO technology and the manufacturer evaluates plans to release this LCD commercially.

Being one of the key backers of an 8K resolution as well as the Super Hi-Vision format, Sharp was among the first to release 8K screens and 8K cameras for professionals as well as 8K UHD TVs for consumers. Several years ago, Sharp demonstrated its first 27-inch 8K IGZO monitor with a 120 Hz refresh rate and 1000 nits luminance, but the device has never been released commercially (at least, it has not been available in stores). This week the company showcased another 8Kp120 display.

Meanwhile, Sony has created a monstrous 783-inch display:

The screen is 19.2 meters (63 feet) long and 5.4 meters (17 feet) high, it features a diagonal of 783 inches and is generally larger than a bus. Sony does not disclose exact resolution of the display (other than saying that it has around 16,000 horizontal pixels), though judging by the looks of the screen we are dealing with something that has a non-standard resolution and a non-standard aspect ratio.

Sony's 16K 783-inch screen uses the company's Crystal LED technology that uses multiple Micro LED-based modules to build custom displays featuring virtually any size, any resolution, and any aspect ratio. Featuring individually-controlled Micro LEDs, the modules have no bezels and can be attached to each other seamlessly. Sony and Samsung use Micro LED/direct-lit LED-based modules to build custom screens for cinemas, airports, showrooms, and other venues that need large displays.

Related: Dell Announces First "Mass-Market" 8K Display
Philips Demos an 8K Monitor
A New Wave of 8K TVs is Coming


Original Submission

Realtek RTD2983 SoC for 8K TVs: Supports AV1 Codec 8 comments

Realtek Demonstrates RTD2893: A Platform for 8K Ultra HD TVs

Just like with any other major transitions, the shift to 8K Ultra HD TVs will require not only new display panels (and even new display technologies), new cables, and new media, but also new codecs as well as new SoCs. To this end, Realtek demonstrated its first platform for 8K televisions and Ultra HD set-top-boxes/players at Computex.

Realtek's RTD2983 SoC can support decoding 8K resolution videos encoded using the AV1, HEVC, and VP9 codecs. The chip can process all HDR formats, reduce noise, upscale, and perform all the other functions common for processors for televisions and digital media players. The RTD2983 has PCIe and USB 3.0 interfaces, it can receive data via an HDMI 2.1 48 Gbps interface, and transmit pixel data over Vby1 wires. One advantage the RTD2983 has is embedded memory, which eliminates necessity to use external DRAM devices, lowering the BOM costs for finished products.

Vby1 = V-by-One HS.

AOMedia Video 1 (AV1).

See also: Vimeo adds support for the royalty-free AV1 video codec

Related: A New Wave of 8K TVs is Coming
YouTube and Netflix Upload AV1-Encoded Videos for Testing
LG Announces its 2019 OLED TV Lineup, Plus an 8K Monstrosity
Intel Releases Open Source Encoder for AV1 Codec


Original Submission

Samsung's 6G White Paper: Available by 2030, 1,000 Gbps Peak Speed, 1 Gbps "User Experienced" Speed 27 comments

Samsung is planning for the commercialization of 6G wireless technology around 2028-2030, with a peak data rate of 1,000 Gbps (1 Tbps) and a user experienced data rate ("minimum achievable data rate for a user in real network environment") of 1 Gbps (this is set at 100 Mbps download, 50 Mbps upload in the case of 5G):

In the white paper, Samsung expects that the completion of the 6G standard and its earliest commercialization date could be as early as 2028, while mass commercialization may occur around 2030. Both humans and machines will be the main users of 6G, and 6G will be characterized by provision of advanced services such as truly immersive extended reality (XR), high-fidelity mobile hologram and digital replica.

Whereas 5G requirements mainly focused on performance aspects, Samsung defines three categories of requirements that have to be met to realize 6G services – performance, architectural and trustworthiness requirements. Examples of 6G performance requirements are a peak data rate of 1,000 Gbps (gigabits per second) and air latency less than 100 microseconds (μs), 50 times the peak data rate and one-tenth the latency of 5G.

[...] The white paper also introduces candidate technologies that could be essential to satisfy the requirements for 6G. These include the use of the terahertz (THz) frequency band, novel antenna technologies to enhance the coverage of high frequency band signals, advanced duplex technologies, the evolution of network topology, spectrum sharing to increase the efficiency of frequency utilization and the use of AI in wireless communications.

Samsung's 6G white paper (PDF) mentions 16K resolution VR, as well as "high-fidelity mobile holograms" and "digital replicas/twins" (basically detailed VR avatars) as possible applications:

Another challenge is sufficient wireless capacity. Note that current AR technology requires 55.3 megabits per second (Mbps) to support 8K display (with one million points), which can provide enough user experience on a mobile display. However, in order to provide truly immersive AR, the density should be largely improved and it will require 0.44 gigabits per second (Gbps) throughput (with 16 million points). In addition, XR media streaming may have similar demands to 16K UHD (Ultra High Definition) quality video. For example, 16K VR requires 0.9 Gbps throughput (with compression ratio of 1/400). The current user experienced data rate of 5G is not sufficient for seamless streaming. It is expected that the market sizes for VR and AR will reach $44.7 billion and $87 billion, respectively, by 2030.

[...] Users will be even able to go beyond observation, and actually interact with the digital twins, using VR devices or holographic displays. A digital twin could be a representation of a remotely controlled set of sensors and actuators. In this manner, a user's interaction with a digital twin can result in actions in the physical world. For example, a user could physically move within a remote site by controlling a robot in that space entirely via real-time interactions with a digital twin representation of that remote site.

Also at Wccftech.


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @04:56PM (7 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @04:56PM (#729262)

    These resolutions are needed for VR but not normal tv.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:55PM (4 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:55PM (#729282)

      i am not sure we will ever reach a "realistic" VR.
      we are at 10nm(?) w/ the cpu and gpu chips (?) and can do "more or less" decent VR @90Hz on two (tiny) 1080p displays...
      if we assume we can go to 3nm before there's no more stopping leaks and we say that halving the trace size doubles the performance, then
      i don't see we go from 1080p to 4K (four times the resolution?) with a doubling of performance from 10nm to 5nm?

      or maybe we just need 4-sli or something ... two GPU per 4K (and enough I/O to the CPUs, RAM, storage, network)?

      • (Score: 4, Informative) by takyon on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:32PM (3 children)

        by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:32PM (#729300) Journal

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_virtual_reality_headsets [wikipedia.org]

        Lenovo Mirage Solo is 2560×1440, 75 Hz. Oculus Go is 2560×1440, 60-72 Hz. These are "standalone" headsets, which should be considered the baseline since they need to operate using battery power. Other headsets can use a fast, short-range wireless connection and visually lossless compression (5:1 may be possible) in order to deliver graphics from a gaming PC to the headset.

        Horizontal field of view is about 100° in these and some other headsets. This should be doubled to about 200-220° to encompass the entirety of human peripheral vision. That also means a doubling of pixels.

        Some headsets are already busting way past 1080p. The Pimax 8K (misleading name?) is 3840×2160 per eye, for a total of 7680×2160 pixels.

        Ultimately, we want the frame rate to go up. At least 120 Hz, maybe even 240 Hz [reddit.com].

        Incidentally, Pimax came up with a technique they call "Brainwarp" that displays 1 image to one eye at a time, and alternates. So instead of displaying 7680×2160 at 120 Hz, they effectively display 3840×2160 at 120 Hz, and you perceive it as 7680×2160 at 120 Hz. Half the GPU power is needed, and they dual GTX 1070s or a single GTX 1080 for this. That's a far cry from the 4-way SLI you're talking about.

        Most GPUs aren't at "10nm" right now. Nvidia's GeForce 20 series is at "12nm". "7nm" will be coming soon. While it's possible that we could go below "3nm" [semiengineering.com], you were probably right to pick that as a stopping point. However, if we ever make "3D chips", we could reach far greater performance with a reprieve from the death of Moore's law.

        There are many tricks that can make ultra high resolution VR and high frame rates possible. The most obvious is foveated rendering [theverge.com]. By tracking the user's eyes, you don't need to render the entire screen at the full resolution. This is explicitly mentioned [roadtovr.com] in research related to LG and Google's 1443 PPI display for VR. Google's Seurat [soylentnews.org] is another thing that can reduce the burden. Add up all of the little tricks, and suddenly realistic VR is not so hard anymore.

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    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:07AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:07AM (#729371)

      The majority of all videos that I watch are on youtube, and almost all of those I view at 240p to save BW as they're mostly educational.

      I hate now that youtube defaults to 720p.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:35PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:35PM (#729499)

        Then why did you buy a 4k monitor?

  • (Score: 2) by bzipitidoo on Saturday September 01 2018, @04:56PM (11 children)

    by bzipitidoo (4388) on Saturday September 01 2018, @04:56PM (#729263) Journal

    720 lines works for me. It's only recently that I decided the 480 line DVD standard left a little to be desired on a small (24 inch) flatscreen. Still very watchable, but 720 really is a lot better. Most noticeable on Youtube videos that have embedded text.

    And, for that 50% more lines, the file is usually only 15% to 20% larger. Moving to 1080 really starts to bump up the size. File size for 8K now, hate to think how awfully large that would be.

    1080 isn't such a big improvement over 720 that I care about it. I'm proud to say I have never bought a Blu-Ray.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:14PM (3 children)

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:14PM (#729268) Journal

      I strongly agree about 720p, which should be the minimum. However, 1080p is a mainstream resolution for most TVs and displays (although there are still some 768p laptops being peddled), and the bump in file size is mitigated by VP9, H.265, and soon, AV1 [wikipedia.org]. Then again, these same codecs can also make very tiny 720p files.

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      • (Score: 3, Informative) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:07PM

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:07PM (#729285) Homepage

        **** needed a new excuse to convince minorities and rednecks to max out their credit cards -- again.

        I'm gonna Fry's and get me a 8-kay big-scrane teavee!

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @11:52AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @11:52AM (#730193)

        i have a screen for the public and a 60fps fullhd source file but the libreelec odroid c1 will do only 30fps, tried both 720p @ 60fps and 1080p @ 30fps, the former looks better. You get to see differences only inspecting closely the perfectly in focus portions of the image. In other words, if you are not doing home theater with a huge ass TV, 720p should be enough for everybody, else fullhd is. 4k for content producers, 8k for VR, hollywood and those guys who go around with 16 cylinder cars. Programmers can use whatever screen estate they want using multiple monitors, the more the better.

        • (Score: 2) by takyon on Tuesday September 04 2018, @01:01PM

          by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Tuesday September 04 2018, @01:01PM (#730212) Journal

          I mostly agree.

          When it comes to VR, you have dynamic (gaming/3D graphics) content and 360-degree video (or the cheaper 180-degree video [soylentnews.org])

          The Pimax (so-called) "8K" headset displays 4K resolution for each eye, for a total of 7680×2160 pixels (half of 8K resolution). According to this table [wikipedia.org], it has a 200º diagonal FOV, and 120º vertical FOV, so horizontal FOV should be 160º. Meanwhile, StarVR has 210º horizontal and 130º vertical FOVs.

          Two human eyes max out at about 200-220º horizontal, 130-135º vertical (or 150º, see below). That should account for far peripheral vision [wikipedia.org], caused by moving your eyes in your sockets. So roughly 200º horizontal and 130º vertical or a bit more should be the end goal for VR headsets.

          An AMD marketing slide [reddit.com] put the end goal for VR resolution at "16K per eye". Google has said [theverge.com] that "the upper bounds of human vision exist at 9600 x 9000, 2,183 ppi, and 160 x 150-degree field of view". Increase 160º to 220º, and you're looking at 13200×9000 resolution. 16K is 15360×8640, so 16K per eye is 30720×8640. So there is some disagreement here. Let's say AMD was being hasty and that 16K alone is sufficient, over a field of view of 220º horizontal, 150º vertical.

          360-degree cameras [wikipedia.org] do not usually have a field of view of 360º horizontal + 360º vertical. If they do, they capture 41,253 square degrees compared to just ~10,504 square degrees for 220º×150º. So about 3.927x more is captured. What happens if you quadruple the pixel count of 16K resolution? You get 32K resolution.

          So there you have it. The ultimate goal of VR video is to capture the pixel equivalent of 32K resolution over an entire sphere. 8K over the full sphere is just 1/16th of the 32K pixel count. Dead spots at the top or bottom of the sphere can be filled in by software.

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    • (Score: 4, Insightful) by fyngyrz on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:24PM (2 children)

      by fyngyrz (6567) on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:24PM (#729298) Journal

      We have 4k here; after a good bit of critical watching, both my SO and I agree that 1080p is about the limit of what is noticeable at normal viewing distances. My vision is 20/10 (better than normal acuity); hers is 20/20. Even with that, we still agree, so likely the visible difference actually lies between 720p and 1080p for both of us.

      We have a fairly large home theater (204") and so it's pretty easy to get up close and see where the resolution actually counts vs. how far back one is comfortable with seeing the entire display. At 1080p, and where the entire screen is comfortably visible, the resolution and viewing angle balance out nicely.

      Consequently, we no longer bother with 4k material. I see no need at all to go to 8k for television. For working on images at a computer... perhaps. Though I think I'd probably be nose-diving into the monitor to get any real benefit from it. That's not actually an invalid use case for image editing, though it's outright absurd for watching movie content.

      But yeah, for normal TV... 1080p actually does look better over 720p at the recommended viewing distance from whatever size display, though frankly, once you're into the presentation, you forget all about it anyway.

      The really noticeable things where 1080p is outright obviously better show up readily with CGI-generated stuff where there is a great deal of tiny detail. But that's pretty rare. I can definitely understand the feeling that 720p will do for most material. Hell, between the soft-focus nonsense most directors seem to insist on and motion blur, sometimes I think that's all there is in the content anyway.

      Oh, and the credits. Credits look better in 1080p. But so what. :)

      1080 isn't such a big improvement over 720 that I care about it. I'm proud to say I have never bought a Blu-Ray.

      One thing about that: many people watch streamed HD content; that's visibly worse than what comes off a Blu-ray. You can't get an accurate sense of what the various resolutions bring in terms of benefits when you're dealing with the lower data rates prevalent in those streams.

      • (Score: 2) by Apparition on Sunday September 02 2018, @03:48AM (1 child)

        by Apparition (6835) on Sunday September 02 2018, @03:48AM (#729412) Journal

        4K is overkill. The real improvement over 1080p is the High Dynamic Range (HDR) and 10 (or 12) bit color. 1080p with HDR and 10 bit color would be great. For whatever reason though, HDR and 10 bit color were tied to 4K resolution, which is why I've upgraded my televisions and players to 4K. 8K though is just nonsense for consumers.

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by takyon on Sunday September 02 2018, @04:19AM

          by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Sunday September 02 2018, @04:19AM (#729417) Journal

          10-bit color has been around for a while, before HDR became a craze. I remember some pirate releases using it years ago.

          I get the sense that the main HDR standards [wikipedia.org] floating around are HDR10, HDR10+ [soylentnews.org], and Dolby Vision, with only Dolby supporting 12-bit color. So it may be a while before 12-bit matters.

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    • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Sunday September 02 2018, @12:39AM (3 children)

      by JoeMerchant (3937) on Sunday September 02 2018, @12:39AM (#729365)

      1080p on a 42" screen starts to matter (to me) when I'm within about 10' of the screen, if I'm further back (like sitting on the sofa in the living room, 20' from the TV where my eyes are comfortable focusing at "infinity") then 720p would be just peachy, and even the 480 content from DVDs is very hard to tell from Blu-Ray.

      We have a 55" 4K, and I sit about arm's reach from it lots of the time, so the resolution helps there, but I'm wondering if I could even see the difference to 8K - maybe in my 30s before my eyesight tanked. Plus, other than CAD and similar work, what content even produces 8K for you to view?

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      • (Score: 2, Funny) by takyon on Sunday September 02 2018, @12:51AM (2 children)

        by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Sunday September 02 2018, @12:51AM (#729370) Journal

        Some of the first 8K video content will be produced by the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo. And one of the only times the extra pixels will matter is when watching the Women's Volleyball events.

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        • (Score: 2) by JoeMerchant on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:48PM (1 child)

          by JoeMerchant (3937) on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:48PM (#729531)

          That's where the content needs to be 800K / 480Hz with the ability to pan / zoom and slow-mo, and even then a 1920x1080 screen is fine for viewing the selected sub-frames.

          --
          🌻🌻 [google.com]
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @12:02PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @12:02PM (#730197)

            get a softcore porn dvd ffs

  • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:01PM (2 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:01PM (#729264)

    the viewing distance recommendations for UHD are pretty much solely based on visual acuity and 8K is twice as wide and twice as high as 4K. For VA = 1.0 the optimal viewing angle would be 58.37° for 4K and 96.33° for 8K. These values were just rounded up to 60° and 100° respectively. At those angles the horizontal retina resolution for VA = 1.0 would be 3970 pixels for 4K and 8194 for 8K. If you think about that you only have maximum visual acuity in the foveola, 8K seems quite a waste; you can only see a circle with a 69 pixel diameter with maximum accuracy at the time out of 7680x4320.

    Here's the math, for those who'd like to check. [tftcentral.co.uk] Are videophiles going to be the new audiophiles?

    • (Score: 3, Insightful) by BsAtHome on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:17PM (1 child)

      by BsAtHome (889) on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:17PM (#729293)

      But, that is math for normal humans. The visualphiles have a better understanding of what can be seen than pure physics.

      Anyway, these higher and higher resolutions may have a niche market for specialized purposes, but the general public... Well, a good seller will sell you everything you do not need. You must be more happy with a television that has larger numbers associated with it, wouldn't you?

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Webweasel on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:08PM (12 children)

    by Webweasel (567) on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:08PM (#729266) Homepage Journal

    What's the point?

    AFAIK no one is broadcasting in 4k and you can't buy a 4k dvd player. So the only real use for 4k is netflix streaming etc.

    If we can barley get any 4k content whats the point in 8k?

    Gaming I understand so is this aimed at the console market?

    --
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    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:14PM (8 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:14PM (#729267)

      Thanks for comfirming: Gaming is about Graphics, only Graphics, and nothing else except Graphics.

      No wonder Games These Days are nothing more than full CGI movies with a few interactive intermissions.

      Get the fuck off my lawn.

      • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:15PM (2 children)

        by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:15PM (#729269) Journal

        Hey, I remember this surly AC!

        What's your take on VR?

        --
        [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
        • (Score: 1, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:33PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:33PM (#729273)

          His lawn hasn't yet been modeled in VR

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:41PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:41PM (#729274)

          VR peaked in 1991

      • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:46PM (4 children)

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:46PM (#729277) Homepage

        Metal Gear Solid 4 and 5 were much better movies than any of the shit Hollywood has churned out in the past decade.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @11:12PM (3 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @11:12PM (#729352)

          So you're the dumb fuck that thinks video game cut-scenes are movies. That's stupid.

          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @11:34PM

            by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @11:34PM (#729357)

            I get the distinct feeling that someone is arguing with themselves.

          • (Score: 2) by Pslytely Psycho on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:18AM

            by Pslytely Psycho (1218) on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:18AM (#729374)

            They were better than the majority of movies made in the last few decades. Hell they frequently are better than the games they are part of...

            --
            Alex Jones lawyer inspires new TV series: CSI Moron Division.
          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:38AM

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:38AM (#729399) Journal
            Given what is currently called "movies", I'm willing to cut this AC considerable slack.
    • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @07:41PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @07:41PM (#729319)

      No, you can't buy a 4K DVD player, you need one of the 4K Blu-Ray players (of which there are a couple dozen to pick from). Oppo ceased manufacturing their 20X series, but Panasonic, Sony, Samsung, Toshiba, Sharp and a variety of other brands still offer them. 4K Blu-Ray discs are available from Best Buy, Amazon and others, with hundreds of titles to choose from. This is not a new thing, the players and discs have been available for years now. If you don't even know that, you are hardly in a position to claim to be an expert on the subject of 4K UHD video.

    • (Score: 2) by Pslytely Psycho on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:07AM

      by Pslytely Psycho (1218) on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:07AM (#729386)

      " is this aimed at the console market?"

      Considering how the consoles seem to be struggling to produce real 4k, and even 1080p for a lot of games at reasonable framerates, I don't think the consoles are the intended target. The target seems to be IMHO, the people who purchase items like these:
      https://www.thecableco.com/accessories/cable-lifts/df-ss-dark-field-suspension-system-set-of-3.html* [thecableco.com]

      *$100 USD EACH cable suspension bridges (Ceramic do-hickeys with a rubber band and something inside that rattles) so your music won't be affected by vibration in the speaker cables....**
      **It took four tries to write that last part, laughing your ass off while typing leads to major spelling mistakes.

      Apparently audiophiles can't listen to music in their cars...all that speaker wire vibration just kills the listening experience.

      --
      Alex Jones lawyer inspires new TV series: CSI Moron Division.
    • (Score: 2) by EvilSS on Sunday September 02 2018, @03:40PM

      by EvilSS (1456) Subscriber Badge on Sunday September 02 2018, @03:40PM (#729548)

      you can't buy a 4k dvd player.

      UHD Blu-ray players (not upscaling players, actual UHD content players) and UHD Blu-rays have been out for years now.

  • (Score: 1) by RandomFactor on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:18PM (10 children)

    by RandomFactor (3682) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:18PM (#729270) Journal

    They require 50MB link for an 8k stream. If you use anywhere near that, and with a 1TB datacap, you can watch what.... ~2 1hr shows a day?

    Hopefully it will drive competition to provide true unlimited plans.

    --
    В «Правде» нет известий, в «Известиях» нет правды
    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:49PM (7 children)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:49PM (#729280)

      The gig economy will make sure you work so many hours you won't have the time to watch one 30 minute episode a week. Get back to driving your uber, slave.

      • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:57PM (4 children)

        by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:57PM (#729283) Journal

        Your comment is good, but Uber drivers will probably be kicked to the curb in a few years in favor of autonomous cars.

        Unlicensed plumbing? Now there's a gig. We also need day laborers and birthday clowns.

        --
        [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:08PM (3 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:08PM (#729286)

          Sure thing dude. Until the autonomous plumber bots arrive. Wonder why that autonomous plumber bot you rented needs an Internet of Things connection? Turns out every autonomous plumber bot is secretly remote controlled by an unlicensed plumber in India.

          • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Saturday September 01 2018, @10:32PM (2 children)

            by c0lo (156) on Saturday September 01 2018, @10:32PM (#729344) Journal

            Until the autonomous plumber bots arrive.

            Until then Harry Tuttle heating engineer at your service [youtube.com]

            --
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @12:07PM (1 child)

              by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday September 04 2018, @12:07PM (#730198)

              We're all in this together.

              • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Tuesday September 04 2018, @01:10PM

                by c0lo (156) on Tuesday September 04 2018, @01:10PM (#730217) Journal

                Beware the paperwork.

                --
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 1) by Ethanol-fueled on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:14PM (1 child)

        by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:14PM (#729290) Homepage

        Many people who drive Lyft and Uber are doctors or other academics, or well-off people who invested in property at the perfect time, or perhaps retired with fat pensions and don't need to work.

        They do it for the social interaction, and some of them are quite up-front about it. It's classic taxicab confessions, and some of the conversations can be quite personal and in-depth.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:23PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:23PM (#729297)

          Is that why Uber and Lyft drivers pester me to ride with them when I'm waiting for a bus instead? I'd rather ride the bus where the driver is forbidden from talking and a recorded voice actor makes all the stop announcements.

    • (Score: 2) by Whoever on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:51PM (1 child)

      by Whoever (4524) on Saturday September 01 2018, @05:51PM (#729281) Journal

      Hopefully it will drive competition to provide true unlimited plans.

      Competition? What competition (in the USA, at least)? LOL.

      This is why Comcast and other ISPs set their monthly transfer limit to high values, such as 1TB: they knew that:
      1. Very few people would be affected by the limit. For most people the limit is meaningless.
      2. People would accept the limit as normal.
      3. Eventually, technology would advance such that the limit would be meaningful for many of their customers.

      It's just another case of slowly boiling the frog.

      ISPs will respond, not by offering unlimited plans, but by offering more expensive plans that have higher limits.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:14PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 01 2018, @06:14PM (#729291)

        This is why Comcast and other ISPs set their monthly transfer limit to high values, such as 1TB

        Except that limit used to be like 30GB in the past. So ... yeah.. I guess your point is moot.

  • (Score: 2) by turgid on Saturday September 01 2018, @07:16PM

    by turgid (4318) on Saturday September 01 2018, @07:16PM (#729314) Journal

    We're all getting older. Our eyesight isn't what it used to be. 30 years too late, I'm afraid.

  • (Score: 5, Funny) by GlennC on Saturday September 01 2018, @10:31PM (1 child)

    by GlennC (3656) on Saturday September 01 2018, @10:31PM (#729343)

    That ought to be enough for anyone.

    --
    Sorry folks...the world is bigger and more varied than you want it to be. Deal with it.
  • (Score: 2) by cellocgw on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:56AM (1 child)

    by cellocgw (4190) on Sunday September 02 2018, @01:56AM (#729383)

    Last I could tell, digital cinema is 4K and that's one big damn screen. I fail to see the value in going to higher resolution.

    --
    Physicist, cellist, former OTTer (1190) resume: https://app.box.com/witthoftresume
    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:35AM

      by takyon (881) <takyonNO@SPAMsoylentnews.org> on Sunday September 02 2018, @02:35AM (#729398) Journal

      5K, 6K, 8K can be used in the production process, and then downscaled to cinematic 4K.

      Due to the fact that it is used in the production process, you'll want monitors with equivalent or higher resolution. Just like you can use a 5K screen to display a 4K image + control panels, you could use a 10K screen with 8K.

      Cameras for IMAX films may be recording more information than 8K resolution [tested.com].

      Most people probably don't want to be sitting in the front row at a movie, because it would exceed their field of view. But with a VR headset, exceeding the user's field of view is actually a good thing. So you could see where VR headsets would benefit from having a higher resolution than cinema projectors.

      None of this really explains why you would want an 8K resolution TV. Presumably, if you got a large enough TV and sat close enough to it, in a small room perhaps, there could be more pixels in your field of view than you would get at a movie theater. The display and TV manufacturers are working on "wallpaper" TVs that would be incredibly thin and light, probably using flexible OLEDs. Maybe we will see TVs that can roll up into a tube for easy transport, and then unroll, made flattened effectively with little-no curling, and cover most of your largest wall. That obviously doesn't apply to these 60-85 inch TVs though.

      If these developments force 4K displays into dirt cheap price segments, that will be a good enough outcome. Although there was already a $180 4K TV during Black Friday 2017 [consumerreports.org], so...

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @10:18PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02 2018, @10:18PM (#729668)

    i'm one of those projector fans that went to the trouble of painting my wall with a special metallic blend because i found the screens that were available way too small. the upgrade from 720p to 1080p was amazing. 4k is also totally worth it on a 14' sceen. 8k might be visible.

    on the other hand, i cant really tell the difference between my 1080p tv and friends' 4k unless i'm within 4' or so.

       

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