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posted by Fnord666 on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:28AM   Printer-friendly
from the corporations-are-people-too dept.

OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma to Plead Guilty to Three Criminal Charges

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma to plead guilty to 3 criminal charges as part of an $8 billion-plus settlement

WASHINGTON (AP) — Purdue Pharma, the company that makes OxyContin, the powerful prescription painkiller that experts say helped touch off an epidemic, will plead guilty to three federal criminal charges as part of a settlement of more than $8 billion, Justice Department officials told The Associated Press.

The company will plead guilty to a criminal information being filed Wednesday in federal court in New Jersey to three counts, including conspiracy to defraud the United States and violating federal anti-kickback laws, the officials said.

The deal does not release any of the company's executives or owners — members of the wealthy Sackler family — from criminal liability. A criminal investigation is ongoing.

The officials were not authorized to discuss the investigation publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Also at: Business Insider, CBS News, and ABC News.

Guilty pleas? You seldom see that - these corporates always seem to get away with weasel word statements to the effect, "We acknowledge no wrongdoing blah blah blah . . . "

Purdue Pharma Pleads Guilty to Opioid Crisis Charges, Will Become a Public Benefit Corporation

OxyContin maker to plead guilty to federal criminal charges, pay $8 billion, and will close the company

Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, has agreed to plead guilty to three federal criminal charges for its role in creating the nation's opioid crisis and will pay more than $8 billion and close down the company.

The money will go to opioid treatment and abatement programs. The privately held company has agreed to pay a $3.5 billion fine as well as forfeit an additional $2 billion in past profits, in addition to the $2.8 billion it agreed to pay in civil liability.
"Purdue Pharma actively thwarted the United States' efforts to ensure compliance and prevent diversion," said Drug Enforcement Administration Assistant Administrator Tim McDermott. "The devastating ripple effect of Purdue's actions left lives lost and others addicted."

The company doesn't have $8 billion in cash available to pay the fines. So Purdue will be dissolved as part of the settlement, and its assets will be used to create a new "public benefit company" controlled by a trust or similar entity designed for the benefit of the American public. The Justice Department said it will function entirely in the public interest rather than to maximize profits. Its future earnings will go to paying the fines and penalties, which in turn will be used to combat the opioid crisis.

That new company will continue to produce painkillers such as OxyContin, as well as drugs to deal with opioid overdose. Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen, who announced the settlement, defended the plans for the new company to continue to sell that drug, saying there are legitimate uses for painkillers such as OxyContin.

Also at The New York Times, Bloomberg, NBC, and CBS.

Previously:


Original Submission


Original Submission

Related Stories

City of Everett, Washington Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma 23 comments

An American city is suing the maker of OxyContin for its alleged role in fueling the national opioid epidemic:

After spending millions to combat the opioid epidemic ravaging its citizens, the working-class city of Everett, Washington, is taking the maker of opioid painkiller OxyContin to federal court. The city claims that the drug maker, Purdue Pharma, knowingly sold to black markets out of pure greed, enabling the devastating epidemic hitting Everett and the rest of the country.

According to the lawsuit (PDF) filed in federal court in Seattle, Everett accuses Purdue Pharma of "knowingly, recklessly, and/or negligently supplying OxyContin to obviously suspicious physicians and pharmacies and enabling the illegal diversion of OxyContin into the black market, including to drug rings, pill mills, and other dealers for dispersal of the highly addictive pills in Everett." Purdue's goal, Everett alleges, was to "generate enormous profits" at the expense of the people of Everett. [...] "Our community has been significantly damaged, and we need to be made whole," Everett's mayor, Ray Stephanson, told ABC News.

[...] In a statement, Purdue disputed Everett's claims, saying that it did notify the DEA and acted responsibly. "We look forward to presenting the facts in court," the company said. Purdue also said that its opioids now account for less than two percent of US opioid prescriptions.


Original Submission

South Carolina Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue 11 comments

South Carolina has become the sixth U.S. state to sue opioid makers over their marketing practices and contribution to the opioid epidemic:

The lawsuit by South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson, filed in Richland County Court of Common Pleas in Columbia, accuses the company of the unfair and deceptive marketing of opioid painkillers. Wilson claimed Purdue has told doctors that patients who receive prescriptions for opioids generally will not become addicted and those who appeared to be were only "pseudoaddicted" and needed more of the drugs.

[...] Since a 2007 settlement with South Carolina, Purdue has continued to downplay the addictiveness of its opioid products and overstated the benefits compared to other pain management treatments, according to the lawsuit. "While there is a time and place for patients to receive opioids, Purdue prevented doctors and patients from receiving complete and accurate information about opioids in order to make informed choices about their treatment options," Wilson said in a statement.

Stamford, Connecticut-based Purdue denied the allegations and said it shares the concerns of South Carolina officials about the crisis and is committed to finding solutions. Purdue and other drugmakers have been sued over opioid products by Oklahoma, Mississippi, Ohio, Missouri and New Hampshire as well as cities and counties in California, Illinois, Ohio, Oregon, Tennessee and New York.

Is this Big Pharma's Tobacco Moment?


Original Submission

Purdue Pharma to Cut Sales Force, Stop Marketing Opioids to Doctors 46 comments

Pain Pill Giant Purdue to Stop Promotion of Opioids to Doctors

Pain-pill giant Purdue Pharma LP will stop promoting its opioid drugs to doctors, a retreat after years of criticism that the company's aggressive sales efforts helped lay the foundation of the U.S. addiction crisis.

The company told employees this week that it would cut its sales force by more than half, to 200 workers. It plans to send a letter Monday to doctors saying that its salespeople will no longer come to their clinics to talk about the company's pain products.

"We have restructured and significantly reduced our commercial operation and will no longer be promoting opioids to prescribers," the company said in a statement. Instead, any questions doctors have will be directed to the Stamford, Connecticut-based company's medical affairs department.

OxyContin, approved in 1995, is the closely held company's biggest-selling drug, though sales of the pain pill have declined in recent years amid competition from generics. It generated $1.8 billion in 2017, down from $2.8 billion five years earlier, according to data compiled by Symphony Health Solutions. It also sells the painkiller Hysingla.

Oxycodone.

Also at Reuters, USA Today, The Verge, and CNN.

Previously: City of Everett, Washington Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma
OxyContin's 12-Hour Problem
South Carolina Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue

Related: Opioid Crisis Partly Blamed on a 1980 Letter to the New England Journal of Medicine
President Trump Declares the Opioid Crisis a National Emergency
Study Finds Stark Increase in Opioid-Related Admissions, Deaths in Nation's ICUs
CVS Limits Opioid Prescriptions
Congress Reacts to Reports that a 2016 Law Hindered DEA's Ability to go after Opioid Distributors
Opioid Crisis Official; Insys Therapeutics Billionaire Founder Charged; Walgreens Stocks Narcan


Original Submission

Colorado Attorney General Sues Purdue Pharma 16 comments

Man who made billions from OxyContin is pushing drug to wean addicts off opioids

Following hundreds of lawsuits over the years against pharmaceutical giant Purdue Pharma, Colorado's attorney general is suing the OxyContin creator for its "significant role in causing the opioid epidemic." The lawsuit claims Purdue Pharma L.P. and Purdue Pharma Inc. deluded doctors and patients in Colorado about the potential for addiction with prescription opioids and continued to push the drugs. And it comes amid news that the company's former chairman and president, Richard Sackler, has patented a new drug to help wean addicts from opioids.

[...] In federal court in 2007, three top current and former employees for Purdue pleaded guilty to criminal charges, admitting that they had falsely led doctors and their patients to believe that OxyContin was less likely to be abused than other drugs in its class, according to The New York Times. Then earlier this year, the Wall Street Journal reported that Purdue planned to stop promoting the drug.

Now, it seems, a new business venture is only adding to the outcry. The Financial Times reported that Sackler, whose family owns Purdue Pharma, a multibillion-dollar company, patented a new drug earlier this year that is a form of buprenorphine, a mild opioid that is used to ease withdrawal symptoms. However, some are expressing outrage that the Sacklers, who have in essence profited from opioid addictions, may soon be profiting from the antidote. "It's reprehensible what Purdue Pharma has done to our public health," Luke Nasta, director of Camelot, a New York-based treatment center for drug and alcohol addiction, told the Financial Times. He told the newspaper that the Sackler family "shouldn't be allowed to peddle any more synthetic opiates - and that includes opioid substitutes."

Financial Times also reported that the Sackler family owns Rhodes Pharma, "a little-known Rhode Island-based drugmaker that is among the largest producers of off-patent generic opioids in the U.S."

Also at The Independent.

Previously: City of Everett, Washington Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma
OxyContin's 12-Hour Problem
South Carolina Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue
Purdue Pharma to Cut Sales Force, Stop Marketing Opioids to Doctors
Tens or Hundreds of Billions of Dollars Needed to Combat Opioid Crisis? (Massachusetts Attorney General sues Sackler family)


Original Submission

OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma May File for Bankruptcy to Disrupt Lawsuits 48 comments

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma reportedly exploring bankruptcy

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is exploring filing for bankruptcy to address potentially significant liabilities from thousands of lawsuits alleging the drug manufacturer contributed to the deadly opioid crisis sweeping the United States, people familiar with the matter said on Monday.

The deliberations show how Purdue and its wealthy owners, the Sackler family, are under pressure to respond to mounting litigation accusing the pharmaceutical company of misleading doctors and patients about risks associated with prolonged use of its prescription opioids.

Purdue denies the allegations, arguing that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved labels for its opioids carried warnings about the risk of abuse and misuse associated with the drugs.

Filing for Chapter 11 protection would halt the lawsuits and allow the drug maker to negotiate legal claims with plaintiffs under the supervision of a U.S. bankruptcy judge, the sources said.

No "Big Tobacco" moment for Purdue Pharma. Cut and run.

Previously: City of Everett, Washington Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma
OxyContin's 12-Hour Problem
South Carolina Sues OxyContin Maker Purdue
Tens or Hundreds of Billions of Dollars Needed to Combat Opioid Crisis?
Purdue Pharma to Cut Sales Force, Stop Marketing Opioids to Doctors
Colorado Attorney General Sues Purdue Pharma

Related: The Dutch Supply Heroin Addicts With Dope and Get Better Results Than USA
U.S. Opioid Deaths May be Plateauing


Original Submission

After Pushing Addictive OxyContin, Purdue Now Pursuing Overdose Antidote 39 comments

Submitted via IRC for AzumaHazuki

[Purdue Pharma] announced this week that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted fast-track status to its investigational drug nalmefene hydrochloride (HCl), an injectable, emergency treatment intended to rescue people suspected of having an opioid overdose. Purdue suggests that nalmefene HCl’s effects last longer than the similar emergency opioid antagonist naloxone. As such, the company hopes nalmefene HCl will out-compete naloxone at reversing overdoses from the most highly potent opioid, namely fentanyl, which is currently driving the alarming numbers of opioid overdose deaths. The FDA’s fast-track status will speed the development and regulatory review of the drug.

[...] In the statement this week, Purdue once again side-stepped any involvement in initiating the epidemic, focusing solely on illicit drug use. Purdue’s president and CEO, Craig Landau was quoted as describing the problem simply as “Fentanyl and illicit opioid deaths continue to increase in the United States, fueled increasingly by overdoses of this class of compounds.”

[...] Purdue announced that it doesn’t intend to make money on the new drug. “As part of Purdue’s commitment to advance meaningful solutions to address the opioid crisis, the company will work to bring forward this option with the commitment not to profit from any future sales of this drug.”

[...] Still, according to internal discussions at Purdue that were made public in a lawsuit brought by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Purdue and members of the wealthy Sackler family that owns the company had carefully researched the money-making potential of treatments aimed at reversing the epidemic.

An un-redacted section of the lawsuit describes a secret plan called Project Tango, which explored Purdue’s expansion into selling treatment options.

Source: https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/03/after-pushing-addictive-oxycontin-purdue-now-pursuing-overdose-antidote/


Original Submission

Purdue Pharma to Pay $270 Million Settlement to Oklahoma 23 comments

Purdue Pharma settles opioid lawsuit for $270m

Purdue Pharma, the drug-maker owned by the billionaire Sackler family, has reached a $270m settlement in a lawsuit which claimed its opioids contributed to the deaths of thousands of people.

The deal with Oklahoma is the first settlement the US firm has struck amid some 2,000 other lawsuits it is facing linked to its painkiller OxyContin.

Purdue is one of several firms named in the claim which alleged they used deceptive practices to sell opioids.

[...]Under the settlement, Purdue will pay $102.5m towards the creation of a National Centre for Addiction Studies and Treatment at Oklahoma State University.

The Sacklers themselves said that they will contribute $75m over five years to the centre.

Also at CNN and NBC.

Previously: OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma May File for Bankruptcy to Disrupt Lawsuits


Original Submission

Report Finds that Purdue Pharma Infiltrated WHO, Manipulated Opioid Policies to Boost Sales 60 comments

Infamous OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma used front organizations and sponsored research to deceive the World Health Organization and corrupt global public health policies with the goal of boosting international opioid sales and profits, according to a Congressional report (PDF) released Thursday, May 22.

The investigation identified two WHO guidance documents that appear to parrot some of Purdue's misleading and outright false marketing claims about the safety and efficacy of their highly addictive opioids.

The findings, released by Reps. Katherine Clark (D-Mass.) and Hal Rogers (R-Ky.), land as the country is still grappling with an epidemic of opioid abuse and overdoses. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, opioid overdoses kill an average of 130 Americans every day.

Clark and Rogers say that the motivation for the investigation follows a 2017 warning letter Congress members sent to the WHO. Given the opioid epidemic unfolding in the US, the lawmakers warned the WHO that opioid makers would try to expand into international markets, which could potentially trigger a global epidemic. But the Congress members say they didn't get a response (though the WHO disputes this).

"When the WHO failed to respond to the letter, we began to question why they would remain silent about such a significant and devastating public health epidemic," the report reads. "The answers we found are deeply disturbing."

Based on public records, the report outlines a tangle of organizations and individuals that connect financial threads from Purdue to WHO.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/05/world-health-organization-parroted-purdues-deceptive-opioid-claims-report-says/


Original Submission

Opioid Talks Fail, Purdue Bankruptcy Filing Expected 25 comments

https://abcnews.go.com/Health/wireStory/opioid-talks-impasse-purdue-bankruptcy-filing-expected-65456920

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is expected to file for bankruptcy after settlement talks over the nation's deadly overdose crisis hit an impasse, attorneys general involved in the talks said Saturday.

The breakdown puts the first federal trial over the opioid epidemic on track to begin next month, likely without Purdue, and sets the stage for a complex legal drama involving nearly every state and hundreds of local governments.

Purdue, the family that owns the company and a group of state attorneys general had been trying for months to find a way to avoid trial and determine Purdue's responsibility for a crisis that has cost 400,000 American lives over the past two decades.

An email from the attorneys general of Tennessee and North Carolina, obtained by The Associated Press, said that Purdue and the Sackler family had rejected two offers from the states over how payments under any settlement would be handled and that the family declined to offer counterproposals.

"As a result, the negotiations are at an impasse, and we expect Purdue to file for bankruptcy protection imminently," Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery and North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein wrote in their message, which was sent to update attorneys general throughout the country on the status of the talks.

[...] The impasse in the talks comes about six weeks before the scheduled start of the first federal trial under the Cleveland litigation, overseen by U.S. District Judge Dan Polster. That trial will hear claims about the toll the opioid epidemic has taken on two Ohio counties, Cuyahoga and Summit.

A bankruptcy filing by Purdue would most certainly remove the company from that trial.

The bankruptcy judge would have wide discretion on how to proceed. That could include allowing the claims against other drugmakers, distributors and pharmacies to move ahead while Purdue's cases are handled separately. Three other manufacturers have already settled with the two Ohio counties to avoid the initial trial.

-- submitted from IRC


Original Submission

Makers of OxiCotin, Purdue Pharma, Files Reorganization Chapter 11 "Bankrupty" 55 comments

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-49711618

In the face of thousands of lawsuits about the alleging abusive practices contributing to the opioid crisis in the US, Purdue Pharma (makers of OxiCotin) are filing Chapter 11 Bankruptcy protection. If the courts agree, this would allow them to restructure their debts and continue operations.

"Under the terms of the [proposed] deal, Purdue is to be dissolved and the money raised - estimated to be about $10bn-$12bn (£8bn-£9.7bn), including a minimum cash contribution of $3bn from the Sackler family - will go towards settling the lawsuits. The Sacklers have also offered an additional $1.5bn from the eventual sale of Mundipharma, another pharmaceutical firm owned by the family.

Several of the states that oppose the deal, such as New York, Connecticut and Massachusetts, have questioned how Purdue came up with the contribution figure.

The states want the Sackler family to put in more of its own money into the deal."

Note: Bankruptcy is not what regular people think it is. Similar to the "kill" command in Unix/Linux, there are lots of versions which may or may not do what people think. As an example, see: https://www.credit.com/debt/filing-for-bankruptcy-difference-between-chapters-7-11-13/


Original Submission

Sacklers Threaten to Scrap Opioid Deal If They Aren’t Shielded From Lawsuits 69 comments

Submitted via IRC for Bytram

Sacklers threaten to scrap opioid deal if they aren't shielded from lawsuits

Lawyers for OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma filed a new complaint late Wednesday threatening that the company's mega-rich owners, the Sackler family, could pull out of a proposed multi-billion-dollar opioid settlement deal if a bankruptcy judge doesn't shield the family from outstanding state lawsuits.

Purdue's lawyers argue that if the lawsuits continue, the Sacklers will have to waste "hundreds of millions of dollars" on legal costs that could otherwise go to claimants in the settlement. The family's lawyers added that in that event, the family "may be unwilling—or unable—to make the billions of dollars of contributions" to the proposed settlement.

State attorneys general, however, argue that the tactic is yet another move designed to shield the Sacklers and their ill-gotten wealth.

"This filing isn't a surprise. It's yet another effort by Purdue to avoid accountability and shield the Sackler family fortune, and we will be opposing it," Maura Healey, the attorney general of Massachusetts, told the New York Times.

Related:


Original Submission

Report: Sacklers Using Fake Doctors, False Marketing to Sell OxyContin in China 26 comments

Report: Sacklers using fake doctors, false marketing to sell OxyContin in China

The mega-rich family behind the OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma is back to selling its highly addictive pain-killer with underhanded tactics and deceptive advertising—this time in China, via its international company, Mundipharma. That’s all according to a searing new investigation by the Associated Press.

The Sackler family, which owns both Purdue and Mundipharma, is embroiled in litigation in the United States over its alleged role in sparking the country’s epidemic of opioid abuse and overdoses. Thousands of plaintiffs—many state and local governments—claim that Purdue and the Sacklers misled patients, doctors, and regulators on the addictiveness of their drugs, aggressively marketed them, and wooed doctors into over-prescribing them.

While Purdue has since declared bankruptcy and stopped promoting OxyContin in the US, the Sacklers seem to be employing the same practices in China.

Based on documents and interviews with multiple Mundipharma representatives in China, the AP investigation found that reps were at times posing as doctors, providing debunked information that its long-acting opioids are safe and less addictive, and even illegally copying private medical records of patients to inform sales tactics.

[...]Mundipharma, meanwhile, is still hiring in China.

The AP story linked above is in-depth and well worth reading. See also: HuffPost.


Original Submission

OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma LP Said to be Brokering Plea Deal in Criminal Probe 8 comments

OxyContin maker said to be brokering plea deal in criminal probe:

Purdue Pharma LP, the OxyContin maker controlled by members of the wealthy Sackler family, is nearing an agreement to plead guilty to criminal charges as part of a broader deal to resolve United States Justice Department probes into its alleged role in fuelling the nation's opioid crisis, six people familiar with the matter said.

Purdue lawyers and federal prosecutors are brokering a plea deal that could be unveiled as quickly as within the next two weeks and include billions of dollars of financial penalties, four of the people said. They stressed that talks are fluid and that some of the terms could change as discussions continue.

In addition to the criminal case, US prosecutors are negotiating a settlement of civil claims also carrying a financial penalty that allege unlawful conduct in Purdue's handling of prescription painkillers, they said.

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  • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:36AM (33 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:36AM (#1067431)

    Curious, is it not, that both Runaway, and takyon, submit a story about narcotic abuse among the lower and uneducated classes? I mean, nobody seems to worry about the steroid abusers, especially in high places! Or the escatsy users? Or the Pot Heads in Colorado, just a short few hours drive from Arkansas. . . Just saying. And we all know that Runaway had an "incident" a few years back, that put him online almost full time, had him playing video games, and ultimately brought him to SN to spew Gartway Pundit Brietbarf stuff. Still on the pain meds, are we, Runaway? Do you need an intervention? Let us know, I am sure a Soylentil near you could come to your aid.

    Takyon, on the otherhand, just a dope fiend. Doesn't matter what dope, any dope with do. Hear he has started on adrenochrome!

    • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @08:00AM (29 children)

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @08:00AM (#1067440) Journal
      What's "curious" about the relationship of this story to its submitters? As noted, it is rare to see a guilty plea.

      I mean, nobody seems to worry about the steroid abusers, especially in high places! Or the escatsy users? Or the Pot Heads in Colorado, just a short few hours drive from Arkansas. . . Just saying.

      What large legal business has used its network of doctors to push steroids, ecstasy, or marijuana? There is no analogous situation with these other drugs.

      • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @09:32AM (5 children)

        by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @09:32AM (#1067443)

        Another right wing druggie! Khallow! I am surprised that you show up? With you it is Vienna circle meth, is it not? Remember what the old time hippies used to say! "Speed kills, man!"

        • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:08AM (4 children)

          by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:08AM (#1067454) Journal
          Sad when you have nothing to say Ari, but have to say it anyway.
          • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:18AM

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:18AM (#1067456)

            He is acting more like a wounded beast than usual. Good.

          • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:16PM (2 children)

            by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:16PM (#1067484) Journal

            "Aristarchus acknowledges no wrongdoing blah blah blah . . . "

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:00PM (1 child)

              by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:00PM (#1067603)

              I don't see any aristarchus posts. What are you guys talking about? Is this more "antifa"?

              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:06PM

                by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:06PM (#1067606)

                Hell no, antifa is just an idea.

      • (Score: 5, Insightful) by SpockLogic on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:58AM (20 children)

        by SpockLogic (2762) on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:58AM (#1067458)

        I don't see one person plead guilty so I don't see anyone going to jail.

        Until the Sacklers go to jail and their ill gotten drug pushing gains are confiscated there will be no justice. A fine is just the cost of doing business.

        --
        Overreacting is one thing, sticking your head up your ass hoping the problem goes away is another - edIII
        • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:01PM (4 children)

          by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:01PM (#1067461) Journal

          I don't see one person plead guilty so I don't see anyone going to jail.

          Trying the people responsible would be a separate court case. The business pleading guilty will have a negative consequence for trials involving corporate officers.

          • (Score: 3, Interesting) by SpockLogic on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:10PM (3 children)

            by SpockLogic (2762) on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:10PM (#1067463)

            Let me know if and/or when anyone is indicted.

            I won't hold my breath.

            --
            Overreacting is one thing, sticking your head up your ass hoping the problem goes away is another - edIII
            • (Score: 2) by Immerman on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:13PM (1 child)

              by Immerman (3985) on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:13PM (#1067483)

              Agreed. When do you ever see executives held responsible for the crimes they oversaw? Only when the crime is committed against the company itself, and not even reliably then.

              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:42PM

                by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:42PM (#1067516)

                This is white collar crime involving billionaires, they won't be tried. That being said, the activities the were engaged in should be far more than what's necessary to pierce the veil separating them from the corporation and go after them directly. Just because you're organized as some sort of liability shielded corporate entity doesn't mean you get unlimited protection. They did go after a number of people involved with Enron and MCI-Worldcom back when they still prosecuted white collar crime occasionally. Otherwise every criminal syndicate would be an LLC and they wouldn't bother hiding their activities. They'd just start a new one every time the old one got busted.

                The main reason why you probably won't see that happen now is that the politicians are that much more corrupt than they were back then. They pretend like ordinary people don't care or don't understand enough of what's going on to want blood, they are wrong. The people have a surprisingly good understanding of a lot of these crimes even if they don't understand all the specifics of how it works.

                These are individuals who need to be publicly executed in front of the NYSE in order to serve as a warning for the rest of the traitorous rats that their time can come too.

            • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:23PM

              by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:23PM (#1067581) Journal

              Let me know if and/or when anyone is indicted.

              I won't hold my breath.

              I'm not holding my breath either. But....both articles do say the criminal investigation is still in progress.

              This is from the Business Insider one:

              The deal does not release any of the company's executives or owners — members of the wealthy Sackler family — from criminal liability. A criminal investigation is ongoing.

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:19PM (5 children)

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:19PM (#1067487)

          Cost of doing business? Did you miss the bit where the company is being dissolved?

          • (Score: 2, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:23PM (4 children)

            by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:23PM (#1067507)

            They are indeed in bankruptcy proceedings which makes this even less of a slap on the wrist than it already was. The bankruptcy court will likely reduce this substantially.

            Really, we need the death penalty here, execute a few of the Sacklers for the thousands upon thousands of deaths that their corrupt activities caused and perhaps the next pharmaceutical company will think twice before doing it. If we're going to have that bullshit felony murder charge where people are charged with murder even if they didn't pull the trigger, intend for the trigger to be pulled or were even in the room at the time, we should be able to find a way of applying it to these sons of bitches that have caused so many deaths.

            • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Gaaark on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:01PM (2 children)

              by Gaaark (41) on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:01PM (#1067527) Journal

              Yup! Hold the people MAKING THE DECISIONS accountable.

              They killed people KNOWING they'd die: so, charge them with murder. A drug pusher killing people on the street woud get murder or manslaughter...why is this different from what the Sacklers did?

              --
              --- Please remind me if I haven't been civil to you: I'm channeling MDC. ---Gaaark 2.0 ---
              • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:42PM (1 child)

                by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:42PM (#1067620)

                I knew a girl who was convicted of manslaughter when her friend ODed while they were smoking crack together... These lying pill pushers are far worse.

                • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @02:11AM

                  by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @02:11AM (#1067767)

                  That's why there needs to be safe harbor laws to protect people like that if they choose to report the OD to the authorities while there's still some hope of saving them.

                  But yeah, if you kill or allow a couple people to die they go super hard and try to have capital punishment, but if you kill dozens you get life and if you cause tens of thousands to die, they let you off with a slap on the wrist and an admonishment.

            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:47PM

              by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:47PM (#1067713)

              That depends. Criminal conviction fines like this are one of the highest priority debts and probably not be dischargeable.

        • (Score: 3, Informative) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:21PM (6 children)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:21PM (#1067489) Journal

          I'm with you. When the individual members of the family start losing assets, then I'll be satisfied. Sell off their homes, their cars, take all of their investments, all of their collectible doo-diddies, the summer home in the mountains, the other summer home in the Bahamas, all of it. They can learn New American, "Would you like fries with that?"

          • (Score: 3, Funny) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:10PM (4 children)

            by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:10PM (#1067552) Journal

            But that would be SOCIALISM! Isn't the FREE MARKET supposed to sort out all that addiction nonsense? Only the NANNY STATE would punish these brave Capitalists for simply making money!

            • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:08PM (3 children)

              by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:08PM (#1067568) Journal

              Apparently, you've confused me with - - - - someone.

              • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:15PM (2 children)

                by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:15PM (#1067572) Journal

                Yep, I confused you with someone who has convictions.

                • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:21PM (1 child)

                  by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:21PM (#1067580) Journal

                  Nope. I've never been to prison.

                  • (Score: 4, Touché) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:45PM

                    by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:45PM (#1067591) Journal

                    I've never been to prison.

                    And therefore, prison reform would be evil socialism.

                    'Cause it's always the same pattern. All government is evil nanny state socialism right up until it's something that affects you personally like an opioid epidemic. At which point you take all those big government handouts and as much assistance as you can get.

                    When this happens to normal people they think "hmm...maybe some of these programs are warranted."

                    When it happens to you it simply gets added to the nanny-state-exception-list and you go right back accusing everybody else who needs help of being thieves and cons.

          • (Score: 1) by khallow on Friday October 23 2020, @01:31PM

            by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Friday October 23 2020, @01:31PM (#1067861) Journal

            When the individual members of the family start losing assets

            They've already lost Purdue Pharma. Their rainmaker is gone. Given the number of states and private parties looking for blood, I don't think they're going to get out of this unscathed.

        • (Score: -1, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:01PM (1 child)

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:01PM (#1067565)

          Drug pushing? There's no such thing. Noone has to "push" drugs. They sell themselves. Grown people are responsible for their own drug habits. Now, if Purdue was truly involved in fraud (towards the customers not the parasites in government) then that is actually a crime.

          • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:11PM

            by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:11PM (#1067571) Journal

            You haven't been paying attention then. Professionals who people trust with their lives were actively pushing these drugs. Actively pushing. Not just standing on a street corner, "Hey buddy, what ya need? I got it all, name your poison!"

      • (Score: 2) by HiThere on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:01PM (1 child)

        by HiThere (866) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:01PM (#1067501) Journal

        Tobacco. Eventually there was a push-back that caused doctors and imitation doctors to stop pushing it on TV, but for a long time they did.

        --
        Javascript is what you use to allow unknown third parties to run software you have no idea about on your computer.
        • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:29PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:29PM (#1067510)

          That's a bit different, tobacco typically takes years of use before cancer and emphysema happen. There's also numerous warning signs that even the most moronic should notice that it's doing bad things. By comparison, getting hooked on opioids is a lot faster and the possibly fatal results also come a lot faster. It's pretty much impossible to smoke so many cigarettes in a given day that this is alone fatal. It takes smoking over a relatively long period of time before you get a statistically significant increase in cancer or heart disease from it.

          Not to mention, that despite all the whining from smokers that "can't quit" the reality is that quitting is pretty straightforward, lock yourself in a room away from cigarettes and you'll magically stop smoking them. Unlike many other substances, like alcohol, where withdrawal can be fatal, nicotine withdrawal is just miserably, but not actually going to kill you. I remember when I was drying out from alcohol nearly 20 years ago that even though I was a relative lightweight in terms of my drinking when compared to other alcoholics, I still got sick as all hell during the process. I hadn't even been drinking that hard or that long either, somebody who was doing more of both probably would have ended up in the hospital trying to quit cold turkey like that.

          I can't speak to quitting opioids specifically, but realistically, the consequences of misusing them are significantly worse than most of the other drugs people do in all regards.

    • (Score: -1, Flamebait) by Ethanol-fueled on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:25AM

      by Ethanol-fueled (2792) on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:25AM (#1067450) Homepage

      Yep, them Jewish drug dealers that run big pharma. Right when they are made to stop peddling narcotics, they create a "pandemic" to force vaccines on the goyim cattle and get taxpayer subsidies for peddling their crap. Being a big pharma Jew must be the most awesome thing in the world, with the exception of being inbred and stinky.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:39PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:39PM (#1067586)

      [...] Doesn't matter what dope, any dope with do. [...]

      My favorite 'dope' is diesel, gasoline, Marvel Mystery Oil, and ATF.

    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @06:05AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @06:05AM (#1067805)

      WTF is this I don't even

      I have the distinct feeling that I just read someone's magnum opus.

      MOAR

  • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:42AM (7 children)

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:42AM (#1067432) Journal

    US opioid epidemic: Worsening crisis overshadowed in presidential race [nzherald.co.nz]

    Like millions of Americans, Diane Urban watched the first presidential debate last month at home with her family. When it was over, she turned off the television and climbed into the bed her 25-year-old son Jordan used to sleep in.

    It was where she found Jordan's lifeless body after he overdosed on the opioid fentanyl one morning in April 2019.

    After watching President Donald Trump target the son of former Vice President Joe Biden for his history of substance abuse, Urban was reminded again of the shame her son lived with during his own battle with addiction.
    ...
    The exchange over Hunter Biden's struggle with addiction was brief, and neither candidate was asked a follow-up question about their plan to tackle the nation's drug addiction and overdose crisis.
    ...
    After a one-year drop in 2018, US opioid overdose deaths increased again in 2019, topping 50,000 for the first time, according to provisional data from the US Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. That accounted for the majority of the 71,000 fatal overdoses from all drugs.

    Ohio, a battleground state in the presidential contest, is on track to have one of its deadliest years of opioid drug overdoses. More residents died of overdoses in May than in any month in at least 14 years, according to preliminary mortality statistics from the state health department.

    https://q961.com/maines-opioid-crisis-continues-to-worsen-amid-pandemic/ [q961.com]

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine's attorney general says Maine’s drug overdose crisis has worsened during the pandemic, largely because of the opioid epidemic.

    Attorney General Aaron Frey says a report compiled by Marcella Sorg of the University of Maine’s Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center showed that drugs caused 132 deaths in the second quarter of 2020.

    That’s a 4% increase from the first quarter of the year.

    Drug overdose deaths have also totaled 258 in the first two quarters of the year, and that’s a 27% increase from the last two quarters of 2019.

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:22PM (6 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @01:22PM (#1067490) Journal

      I guess that explains a lot of those 300,000 excess deaths that Trump is being blamed for.

      • (Score: 4, Insightful) by DannyB on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:18PM

        by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:18PM (#1067533) Journal

        No. The deaths that Trump could have tried to prevent are unrelated to the oxycontin deaths.

        --
        With modern TVs you don't have to worry about braking the yolk on the back of the picture tube.
      • (Score: 2) by einar on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:39PM (4 children)

        by einar (494) on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:39PM (#1067619)

        Actually, as the president you are responsible for all the excess deaths.

        • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:47PM (3 children)

          by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:47PM (#1067622) Journal

          I didn't realize that. So, whoever happens to be president when all the baby boomers drop dead will be at fault?

          • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:48PM (2 children)

            by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:48PM (#1067714) Journal

            Did it cross your mind that responsibility != fault? It is what someone does to honor the responsibility that may result in the one being at fault.

            See also responsibility vs accountability [google.com].

            --
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
            • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:54PM (1 child)

              by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @10:54PM (#1067719) Journal

              Just for the record, when I drop dead, it won't be President West's responsibility, or his fault.

              I may be his responsibility when you drop dead though. He may decide to nuke Australia to ensure that the drop bears and combat wombats never invade the US.

              • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:04PM

                by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @11:04PM (#1067721) Journal

                It will be your fault if you don't keep him accountable.

                --
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0 https://soylentnews.org/~MichaelDavidCrawford
  • (Score: 2) by Snotnose on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:52AM (5 children)

    by Snotnose (1623) on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:52AM (#1067435)

    How much did they make peddling their addictive opioids? I'm guessing it was way north of $8 billion.

    --
    When the dust settled America realized it was saved by a porn star.
    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @07:59AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @07:59AM (#1067439)

      Just as concerned how many of them are now invested in companies providing services for that $8bil?

    • (Score: 2, Interesting) by nitehawk214 on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:29PM

      by nitehawk214 (1304) on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:29PM (#1067511)

      Yep, the only way to curtail this stuff is to make sure the executives go to pound-me-in-the-ass prison. No amount of fines will harm them. The shareholders pay that. And if the executives are also shareholders, well, they will arrange to sell off before the share prices bottoms out.

      And executives always get a free pass to move on to another company once they ruin the one they are at. The old-boy network always makes sure to hire their friends. This is part of the reason these guys are all board members on each other's companies. It isn't enough to have a golden parachute, there must be a golden landing place for all "temporarily disgraced" billionaires.

      --
      "Don't you ever miss the days when you used to be nostalgic?" -Loiosh
    • (Score: 1, Interesting) by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:35PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Thursday October 22 2020, @02:35PM (#1067514)

      Probably, but that's from the company, the family itself is only giving $250m or so to the fund from what I've read. They will still remain billionaires even if the deal goes through as is. Even if they paid all of the money from their personal finances, they still would be super-wealthy.

      Ultimately, without jail, and preferably a death penalty conviction, there's little to discourage future pharmaceutical companies from doing the same thing. They're just giving back some of the ill-begotten gains and appear set to escape any real accountability. They'll still be ultra-wealthy and probably back to other psychopathic tricks very soon.

    • (Score: 0, Offtopic) by The Mighty Buzzard on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:57PM

      by The Mighty Buzzard (18) Subscriber Badge <themightybuzzard@proton.me> on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:57PM (#1067548) Homepage Journal

      At least part of the problem there is that businesses don't get to keep every dime they earn any more than you or I do. Not even of profit. Taxes and expenses take a bite out of everybody, high or low.

      --
      My rights don't end where your fear begins.
    • (Score: 2) by deimtee on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:28PM

      by deimtee (3272) on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:28PM (#1067556) Journal

      Do you really think that the 8 Giga$ will be paid? There is already a lot of card shuffling going on and "the company" is declaring bankruptcy. I think it extremely likely that the fine will end up being owed by a bankrupt shell, while the Sacklers walk away. Might cost them a few million in bribes, but politicians are remarkably cheap.

      --
      If you cough while drinking cheap red wine it really cleans out your sinuses.
  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by Mojibake Tengu on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:58AM (15 children)

    by Mojibake Tengu (8598) on Thursday October 22 2020, @06:58AM (#1067436) Journal

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sackler_family [wikipedia.org]

    They did it consciously and willingly. To my measures, they are not just some random criminals by technical neglect, those people are guilty of intentional genocide.
    However, I am almost sure privileges of their caste will override any possible criminal liability, as usual with the Cult.

    --
    Respect Authorities. Know your social status. Woke responsibly.
    • (Score: 2) by MostCynical on Thursday October 22 2020, @08:37AM (1 child)

      by MostCynical (2589) on Thursday October 22 2020, @08:37AM (#1067441) Journal

      Are there any Sacklers left owning any parts of Purdue, now? Surely they have divested their shares to off shore shelf companies by now?

       

      --
      "I guess once you start doubting, there's no end to it." -Batou, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex
      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:21PM

        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:21PM (#1067467) Journal

        Surely they have divested their shares to off shore shelf companies by now?

        Divested to who? Even if they moved it around or unloaded as much as they could (particularly on targets that might not be able to fight back, like their company pension programs), they took a wash on it. There's not enough suckers out there and with the bankruptcy, the stock is now worthless no matter what shell corporation holds it.

    • (Score: 2, Insightful) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:13PM (8 children)

      by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @12:13PM (#1067465) Journal

      However, I am almost sure privileges of their caste will override any possible criminal liability, as usual with the Cult.

      What is their "caste"? The family went from poor Jewish immigrants to billionaire drug lords in three generations. Caste implies a social stratification that is hereditary and almost permanent - one doesn't bounce around. Here, we see tremendous fluidity in their status contrary to that implication.

      • (Score: 3, Touché) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:06PM (7 children)

        by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:06PM (#1067550) Journal

        When I see two full generations of people who never needed to work for a living "fluidity in their status" is not the descriptor I would use.

        • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:56PM (6 children)

          by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:56PM (#1067561) Journal

          When I see two full generations of people who never needed to work for a living "fluidity in their status" is not the descriptor I would use.

          Two full generations is still just two generations. Not feeling your seeing here.

          • (Score: 2) by DeathMonkey on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:18PM (5 children)

            by DeathMonkey (1380) on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:18PM (#1067576) Journal

            Exactly how many trust-fund-baby-generations are required before you would say it is no longer fluid?

            • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:48PM

              by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @05:48PM (#1067593) Journal
              About four or five, assuming substantial exponential increase in population through birth and marriage and that they don't have more billionaire generating relatives. Here, there really were three good businessmen in generation 0. That covers a lot of trust-fund babies. I think we're already seeing the departure of future generations from trust-fund baby status.
            • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Friday October 23 2020, @01:42AM (3 children)

              by PartTimeZombie (4827) on Friday October 23 2020, @01:42AM (#1067760)

              It doesn't really matter how many generations, these people are the children and grandchildren of wealth and privilege.

              Your ruling class won't be wanting them to go to jail, setting a precedent like that would be bad.

              • (Score: 1) by khallow on Friday October 23 2020, @03:10PM (2 children)

                by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Friday October 23 2020, @03:10PM (#1067903) Journal

                It doesn't really matter how many generations, these people are the children and grandchildren of wealth and privilege.

                Does it similarly not really matter to you whether they committed a crime or not?

                Your ruling class won't be wanting them to go to jail, setting a precedent like that would be bad.

                Your ruling class would also not want someone who destabilizes the system.

                • (Score: 2) by PartTimeZombie on Monday October 26 2020, @08:01PM (1 child)

                  by PartTimeZombie (4827) on Monday October 26 2020, @08:01PM (#1069030)

                  Does it similarly not really matter to you whether they committed a crime or not?

                  Of course it matters, and the courts are where that is supposed to be resolved. The problem is that your court system (and mine) are set up so that if you're rich enough you can evade any punishment.

                  Of course the ruling class want to avoid destabilizing the system. That is slightly redundant.

                  • (Score: 2, Interesting) by khallow on Tuesday October 27 2020, @02:03AM

                    by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Tuesday October 27 2020, @02:03AM (#1069153) Journal

                    The problem is that your court system (and mine) are set up so that if you're rich enough you can evade any punishment.

                    We'll see if that happens here. It's worth remembering that just like normal trials, the government still needs to provide evidence of wrong-doing. Just being rich or having the wrong surname, doesn't mean that one is guilty. Having said that, if this were gangbangers from Chicago, the feds would have seized the assets of the company by now and have the entire hierarchy in jail on RICO charges. They definitely are treading timidly on this group.

    • (Score: 2) by Freeman on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:39PM (2 children)

      by Freeman (732) on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:39PM (#1067542) Journal

      That's not genocide:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genocide [wikipedia.org]

      Genocide is the intentional action to destroy a people—usually defined as an ethnic, national, racial, or religious group—in whole or in part.

      The things they did and the problems they caused are horrendous, but genocide it is not.

      --
      Joshua 1:9 "Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the Lord thy God is with thee"
      • (Score: 1) by khallow on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:58PM (1 child)

        by khallow (3766) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @04:58PM (#1067562) Journal
        I imagine the earlier poster has some ethnic group in mind, maybe rural white or so. I don't consider that genocide, if only because it doesn't actually hurt any ethnic groups enough to count as genocide.
    • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @06:31AM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday October 23 2020, @06:31AM (#1067808)

      Now this is a beautiful synergy of evidence based medicine and applied business intelligence [nytimes.com] if I ever saw one.

      The cream of the crop of a new generation of managers harnessing the divine insights out of McKinsey's trailblazing manifesto of the information age, Knowledge Unplugged [amazon.com].

      The man should be given a Nobel Prize in Business Administration.

  • (Score: 5, Interesting) by DannyB on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:28PM (2 children)

    by DannyB (5839) Subscriber Badge on Thursday October 22 2020, @03:28PM (#1067539) Journal

    The opioid crisis made it more difficult for people who legitimately use narcotic painkillers to obtain them.

    The legislators were trying to "do something". And like anything that any politician touches, it has a reverse Midas touch and turns into doo doo. To get your narcotic medication, you had to physically go to the doctor, and get an actual piece of paper to take to your pharmacy. No electronic sending of opioid prescriptions to the pharmacy! Nope, nosiree! We need to make the people least mobile, and least able to make unnecessary trips, be the ones to have to experience maximal inconvenience to get their pain medications.

    Fortunately sanity prevailed recently and it is possible to have narcotic pain killers sent electronically to the pharmacy once again.

    --
    With modern TVs you don't have to worry about braking the yolk on the back of the picture tube.
    • (Score: 3, Interesting) by Booga1 on Saturday October 24 2020, @12:21AM (1 child)

      by Booga1 (6333) on Saturday October 24 2020, @12:21AM (#1068110)

      I have witnessed a friend of mine go through something similar. He was in a motorcycle accident and severely injured(fractured vertebrae, reattached arm, etc...) and given a prescription for an opioid based pain killer. The swing in the other direction seriously hindered his ability to manage his pain. One pharmacist asked him "are you sure you really need this filled?" They almost treated him like some junkie until he pulled down the collar of his shirt and showed the stitches in his shoulder.

      Another pharmacy straight up refused to refill his painkiller prescription because they were afraid of being swept up in the lawsuits the state's district attorney had been filing against the drug companies and some doctors in our state. It sounds ridiculous until you find out that the same county apparently had more painkiller prescriptions given out and filled than there were actual residents in the county. How the heck that happens is beyond me, but I can imagine some politician thinking that paper based solution would be the "simple, easy" answer to the problem.

      • (Score: 1, Informative) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 24 2020, @12:37PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 24 2020, @12:37PM (#1068219)

        That is probably out of town dealers sending mules to get scripts. It's not easy to find a doctor stupid and greedy enough to participate in these schemes.

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