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posted by martyb on Friday September 14 2018, @11:07PM   Printer-friendly [Skip to comment(s)]
from the We've-got-top-men-looking-into-it dept.

Russian theory that NASA sabotaged the space station spreading like wildfire

As you may recall, a low-pressure leak occurred aboard the International Space Station in late August. Eventually the crews traced the leak to the orbital module of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft that had arrived at the station in June. After the problem was traced to what appears to be a manufacturing defect, the head of Russia's space program essentially called for the head of whoever made the error. Now, however, something entirely new is afoot in Russia. A growing number of Russian publications have been putting forth an absurd new theory—that a NASA astronaut deliberately caused the leak on board the station in order to force the evacuation of a sick crew member. The story has spread like wildfire during the last 24 hours, according to Robinson Mitchell, who translates Russian space stories for Ars.

One of the most prominent articles was published Wednesday in Kommersant, which says Russian investigators are vigorously pursuing the claim that Americans may have damaged the Soyuz deliberately. Publicly, Roscosmos leader Dmitry Rogozin was quoted as saying about Russia's investigation into the leak, "Results we have received do not give us an objective picture. The situation is much more complex than we earlier thought." Privately, however, several sources from the space agency are leaking much juicier comments to the Russian media. "Our Soyuz is next to the Rassvet (Dawn) module, right next to the hatch into the American segment of the station," one source told Kommersant. "Access to our ship is possible only with the permission of our commander, but we cannot exclude an unsanctioned access by the Americans."

The NASA/Roscosmos joint statement:

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine and Roscosmos General Director Dmitry Rogozin met for the first time yesterday via teleconference to discuss the status of International Space Station (ISS) operations in response to a request from Roscosmos. As part of their discussion, Dmitry Rogozin informed his American counterpart about Roscosmos' decision to establish a Roscosmos-led Commission to investigate the cause of the leak in the Soyuz (MS-09/55S) spacecraft currently docked to the station. The Administrator and the General Director noted speculations circulating in the media regarding the possible cause of the incident and agreed on deferring any preliminary conclusions and providing any explanations until the final investigation has been completed.

They affirmed the necessity of further close interaction between NASA and Roscosmos technical teams in identifying and eliminating the cause of the leak, as well as continuation of normal ISS operations and NASA's ongoing support of the Roscosmos-led Soyuz investigation. They acknowledged the entire crew is dedicated to the safe operation of the station and all docked spacecraft to ensure mission success.

The Administrator and the Roscosmos General Director agreed to conduct their first face-to-face meeting at the Baikonur Cosmodrome on or about Oct. 10 when the NASA Administrator will visit Russia and Kazakhstan in conjunction with the upcoming Soyuz crew spacecraft launch of American astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexy Ovchinin.

Previously: Russian Space Chief Vows to Find "Full Name" of Technician Who Caused ISS Leak


Original Submission

Related Stories

Russia's Space Leader Blusters About Mars in the Face of Stiff Budget Cuts 24 comments

Russia's space leader blusters about Mars in the face of stiff budget cuts

The leader of Russia's civil space program appears to be increasingly disengaged from reality. In recent months Dmitry Rogozin, the chief of Roscosmos, has given a series of interviews in which he has made all manner of big promises about the supposedly bright future of Russia's space program.

For example, in an interview published just today, Rogozin made the fantastical claim that his country's space program has the technical means to reach Mars and land cosmonauts there within eight to 10 years. If Russia is ready to finance such a plan, Rogozin guaranteed that Roscosmos stands ready to deliver.

Russia, Rogozin also recently said, is ready to do reuse better than SpaceX and the United States. SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket, he said, is only "semi-reusable," and Russia aspires to build a 21st-century rocket capable of 100 flights. He then reiterated that Russia would like to develop a version of its Soyuz rocket that has a methane-fueled engine.

SpaceX has flown its Falcon 9 first-stage rockets five times, and it plans to push toward reusing each booster 10 times. It is not clear what, if any, steps Russia has taken toward reuse. The reality is that Russia depends on reliable but decades-old technology to get into space. And while Rogozin talks a good game about sending his cosmonauts to the Moon or to Mars, and about competing with SpaceX on reusable rockets, this appears to be mostly bluster.

If you are still under any illusions about the state of Russia's space program, now is the time to dispel them.

Previously: Russian Space Agency Abolished and Replaced Following Financial Violations
Price War Between SpaceX and Russia
Russian Rocket Builder May Have Replaced Special Alloys With Cheap Metals
NASA and Roscosmos Release Joint Statement on ISS Leak Amid Rumors
Head of Russian Space Agency Roscosmos Wavers on Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway
Russia Space Chief Spars with Elon Musk Over Launch Pricing


Original Submission

Head of Russian Space Agency Roscosmos Wavers on Lunar Orbital Platform-Gateway 33 comments

Russia throws doubt on joint lunar space station with U.S.: RIA

Moscow may abandon a project to build a space station in lunar orbit in partnership with U.S. space agency NASA because it does not want a "second fiddle role," a Russian official said on Saturday.

[...] [The] head of Russian space agency Roscosmos, Dmitry Rogozin, said Russia might exit the joint program and instead propose its own lunar orbit space station project.

[...] A spokesman for Roscosmos said later that Russia had no immediate plans to leave the project. "Russia has not refused to take part in the project of the lunar orbit station with the USA," Vladimir Ustimenko was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency.

FLOP-G?

Also at ABC (Associated Press).

Previously:

Related:


Original Submission

Russian Space Chief Vows to Find "Full Name" of Technician Who Caused ISS Leak 35 comments

Ars Technica:

Last week, a pressure leak occurred on the International Space Station. It was slow and posed no immediate threat to the crew, with the atmosphere leaving the station at a rate such that depressurization of the station would have taken 14 days.

Eventually, US and Russian crew members traced the leak to a 2mm breach in the orbital module of the Soyuz MS-09 vehicle that had flown to the space station in June. The module had carried Russian cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, and NASA's Serena M. Auñón-Chancellor.

[...] The drama might have ended there, as it was initially presumed that the breach had been caused by a tiny bit of orbital debris. However, recent Russian news reports have shown that the problem was, in fact, a manufacturing defect. It remains unclear whether the hole was an accidental error or intentional. There is evidence that a technician saw the drilling mistake and covered the hole with glue, which prevented the problem from being detected during a vacuum test.


Original Submission

Future of U.S.-Russian Space Cooperation in Doubt 15 comments

Russia Wants to Extend U.S. Space Partnership. Or It Could Turn to China.

The American incentives for engaging with Russia in space in the 1990s — political goals like the employment of idle rocket scientists to prevent missile proliferation — have mostly disappeared with the resumption of tensions. The Trump administration has already proposed that by 2025 the United States should stop supporting the International Space Station that is the principal joint project today. A final decision is up to Congress. The American role might be shifted to a commercial footing thereafter.

[...] [It] is unclear how much longer the post-Soviet era of space cooperation between the United States and Russia can last in the more hostile environment now surrounding relations. In the interview, [Dmitri O. Rogozin, the director of Russia's space agency,] said Russia wanted to carry on joint flights with the United States and its allies, despite the tensions over election interference, wars in Syria and Ukraine, and the chemical weapons poisoning of a former double agent in Britain.

[...] Analysts say Moscow has a strong incentive to maintain the joint program: a decided lack of money to pursue a lunar station on its own. Russia's budget for its space program is something less than one-10th what the United States spends on NASA. [...] Russia's preference is to press on with a space program entwined with the United States', on either the lunar program or another venture, Mr. Rogozin said. But if talks fail, Russia can turn to China or India for partnership. There might then be two stations circling the Earth or the moon, one led by the United States the other a Russian-Chinese enterprise. Mr. Rogozin even floated the idea of a "BRIC station," the acronym for the developing economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China.

Mr. Rogozin in November ordered the Russian Academy of Sciences to study the prospects for a solo Russian program to build a habitable base on the surface of the moon. Ivan M. Moiseyev, the director of the Institute of Space Policy in Moscow, said in a telephone interview that any proposal for a lone Russian lunar station was fantastical, given the budget constraints. "The technical capability exists, but the finances don't."

The U.S. and NASA could develop stronger partnerships with the European Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and Indian Space Research Organisation instead.

Previously:

Related: Price War Between SpaceX and Russia


Original Submission

One Hull Crack Located in ISS, Another One Suspected 35 comments

One hull crack located in ISS, another one suspected:

The specialists have discovered one more crack at the International Space Station and suspect that yet another one exists, ISS Russian Segment head Vladimir Solovyov told [news channel] Rossiya-24.

"So far, we have found one place and suspect another, where as some kind of leak exists. We must bring a powerful microscope on a cargo spacecraft and use to examine this place. We are not totally certain so far," Solovyov said.

[...] "We are working on it, of course. We understand clearly that these places are at issue. The[sic] are indeed not airtight, we understand that there could be some other places, but there is no horror in that, I can say it responsible[sic] as the mission head," he assured.

Also At: BoingBoing

Previously:
(2018) NASA and Roscosmos Release Joint Statement on ISS Leak Amid Rumors
(2018) Controversy Over ISS Leak Continues, Spacewalk Planned for November


Original Submission

Cosmonauts Cut Into Soyuz Docked at the ISS During Nearly 8-Hour Spacewalk 7 comments

Two Russian cosmonauts have removed samples from a Soyuz spacecraft docked at the International Space Station during a spacewalk. They used knives and shears to cut around the now-sealed 2mm hole in the Soyuz MS-09:

Expedition 57 flight engineers Oleg Kononenko and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian federal space agency Roscosmos conducted the 7-hour and 45-minute spacewalk. The two cosmonauts worked on the exterior of the Russian Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft, where the space station's crew had earlier found and repaired the leak from the inside.

[...] Today, Prokopyev joined Kononenko on a spacewalk to inspect the repair area from the outside in an effort to discover what caused the leak and to collect a sample of the epoxy that had extruded through the hole from the inside. To reach the area needed to perform the inspection, Kononenko rode at the end of two Russian Strela booms, translating from the Pirs docking compartment where the spacewalk began to the Zarya functional cargo block (FGB) and then up alongside the Soyuz. Prokopyev controlled the booms' motion from the opposite end, moving Kononenko into place, before shimmying up the second boom himself.

At the worksite, Kononenko and Prokopyev took turns using a knife and a pair of long-arm scissors to stab at and cut away layers of brown, gold and silvery insulation. As they cut into the spacecraft, small fragments of the material floated away and formed a cloud of debris. The two cosmonauts then used the same tools to cut into and peel away a thin metal orbital debris shield to expose the hole in the Soyuz MS-09's orbital compartment. [...] Kononenko used a pair of forceps and a swab to collect samples of the dark epoxy. The residue, stowed inside a bag, was brought back inside the space station and will be returned to Earth for analysis.

Also at BBC.

Previously: Russian Space Chief Vows to Find "Full Name" of Technician Who Caused ISS Leak
NASA and Roscosmos Release Joint Statement on ISS Leak Amid Rumors
Controversy Over ISS Leak Continues, Spacewalk Planned for November


Original Submission

Russia's Space Program Just Threw a NASA Astronaut Under the Bus 47 comments

Russia’s space program just threw a NASA astronaut under the bus:

Russia's state-owned news service, TASS, has published an extraordinarily defamatory article about NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor. The publication claims that Auñón-Chancellor had an emotional breakdown in space, then damaged a Russian spacecraft in order to return early. This, of course, is a complete fabrication.

The context for the article is the recent, near-disastrous docking of the Russian Nauka science module with the International Space Station. The TASS article attempts to rebut criticism in US publications (including Ars Technica) that covered the incident and raised questions about the future of the Roscosmos-NASA partnership in space.

One of a dozen rebuttals in the TASS article concerns a 2018 incident—a 2 mm breach in the orbital module of the Soyuz MS-09 vehicle docked with the International Space Station. Russian cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev, European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst, and NASA's Auñón-Chancellor had flown to the station inside this Soyuz in June. The leak was discovered in late August.

Previously:
(2020-09-05) Source of International Space Station Leak Still Not Found, NASA Says
(2018-12-13) Cosmonauts Cut Into Soyuz Docked at the ISS During Nearly 8-Hour Spacewalk
(2018-11-03) Roscosmos Completes Investigation into October Soyuz Failure, Finds Assembly Issue
(2018-10-03) Controversy Over ISS Leak Continues, Spacewalk Planned for November
(2018-09-14) NASA and Roscosmos Release Joint Statement on ISS Leak Amid Rumors
(2018-09-06) Russian Space Chief Vows to Find "Full Name" of Technician Who Caused ISS Leak


Original Submission

Controversy Over ISS Leak Continues, Spacewalk Planned for November 22 comments

After more speculation about cause of ISS leak, NASA issues another statement

A thorough Russian investigation of a leak that occurred in August in the orbital module of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft, which is attached to the International Space Station, will not be completed until November. But this week, the head of the Russian space agency Roscosmos reignited controversy about the leak with some comments during a television appearance.

A preliminary investigation, according to Russia's chief spaceflight official, Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, "concluded that a manufacturing defect had been ruled out which is important to establish the truth." So if it wasn't a manufacturing defect, then what was it? As Rogozin did not say, this re-fueled speculation in some media reports that the hole was intentionally drilled by NASA astronauts in space. This theory is nonsensical, but it appears to play well to Russian audiences.

After these latest comments and with an imminent Soyuz spacecraft launch on October 11 that will carry NASA astronaut Nick Hague to the International Space Station, the US space agency felt the need to put out a new statement on Wednesday. It reads:

On Aug. 29, 2018 a small hole was discovered on the International Space Station. This resulted in a pressure leak. The hole has been identified and fixed by space station crew.

Russian media recently reported that General Director Rogozin said the hole was not a manufacturing defect. Ruling out a manufacturing defect indicates that this is an isolated issue which does not categorically affect future production.

This conclusion does not necessarily mean the hole was created intentionally or with mal-intent. NASA and Roscosmos are both investigating the incident to determine the cause. The International Space Station Program is tentatively planning a spacewalk in November to gather more information.

On October 11, American Astronaut Nick Hague and Russian Cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin will launch to the International Space Station on a Russian Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Administrator Bridenstine is scheduled to attend the launch and plans to meet with Mr. Rogozin. This will be their first in-person meeting. They had a telephone call on September 12 during which they discussed the International Space Station leak.

Previously: Russian Space Chief Vows to Find "Full Name" of Technician Who Caused ISS Leak
NASA and Roscosmos Release Joint Statement on ISS Leak Amid Rumors


Original Submission

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  • (Score: 0, Troll) by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14 2018, @11:17PM (8 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14 2018, @11:17PM (#735137)

    The drill marks look they were made by a person with no practical experience handling a drill. And the part had been painted before the hole was drilled, so probably after manufacture.

    I'm sure the Russians seal parts up before getting sent to launch, so in space sabotage, with access made possible by weightlessness, is a serious possibility.

    • (Score: 2, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14 2018, @11:33PM

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 14 2018, @11:33PM (#735148)

      Ah ha! Russian collusion in space, now Trump's SPACE FORCE makes more sense. They needed a scandal to funnel money into the super expensive so-secret-they-can't-show-pictures SPACE FORCE! space force chaaaaa.

    • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Friday September 14 2018, @11:39PM (3 children)

      by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Friday September 14 2018, @11:39PM (#735152) Homepage Journal

      I would be interested in looking at those photos. Please don't link to some grainy stuff that could just as easily be the bottom of a septic tank. Just a simple photo, showing details please. Something on Kodachrome would be a nice bonus. Nikons are nice . . .

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rlDTK6QI-w [youtube.com]

      --
      Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.
      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:00AM (1 child)

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:00AM (#735159)

        What's next, 50 ways to leave your drill marks?

        • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @11:23PM

          by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @11:23PM (#735467)

          Oh that got a good chuckle :{D

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @06:06AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @06:06AM (#735221)

        The picture I saw of the hole had scratch marks in the paint where the bit skipped until it bit into the metal.

    • (Score: 5, Funny) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:01AM (1 child)

      by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:01AM (#735173)

      It's a 2mm hole, so it's pretty certain the Russians did it themselves.

      Americans would have used a 5/64" bit.

      • (Score: 1, Insightful) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @03:26AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @03:26AM (#735203)

        Americans would have used a #47 bit.

    • (Score: 2) by FatPhil on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:56PM

      by FatPhil (863) <{pc-soylent} {at} {asdf.fi}> on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:56PM (#735293) Homepage
      You sexist bastard! And because of the patriarchally-imposed gender imbalance on the ISS, that narrows it down to one person.
      --
      Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people; the smallest discuss themselves
  • (Score: 5, Funny) by Runaway1956 on Friday September 14 2018, @11:22PM (7 children)

    by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Friday September 14 2018, @11:22PM (#735140) Homepage Journal

    One of my grand daughters was out gallivanting on her unicorn. Being magical creatures, the unicorn can take her way up high, beyond the atmosphere, while carrying it's own air supply. Anyway, they saw the space station, and decided to explore. They weren't challenged on the way in, so they snooped all over the place. When it was time to leave, the unicorn was in a tough position in a tight spot, and accidentally caused that "drill hole".

    We've scolded the grand daughter, and told her no more unicorn rides for a month. She has promised to act more responsibly in the future. The next time she visits the space station, she'll get a fairy to take her. Fairies are fine - but we warned her about those damned gremlins. Gremlins are nothing but problems!

    --
    Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.
    • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:44AM (6 children)

      by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:44AM (#735169) Journal

      Knowing that the hole is near the toilet, I reckon you still have a thing or two to tell her.

      --
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:58AM (4 children)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:58AM (#735172) Homepage Journal

        Me tell her? Are you nuts? Grandpa is forbidden to tell the child certain things. For instance, magic. Informing the girl that magic isn't real would result in my near-instantaneous death at the hands of Mama and Grandma. Let's make a deal - YOU tell her!

        --
        Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.
        • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:22AM (3 children)

          by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:22AM (#735179) Journal

          Let's make a deal - YOU tell her!

          That's not a deal; what's in for me?

          --
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
          • (Score: 2) by MostCynical on Saturday September 15 2018, @03:38AM

            by MostCynical (2589) on Saturday September 15 2018, @03:38AM (#735205) Journal

            Slow, and likely painful, death.

            --
            "I guess once you start doubting, there's no end to it." -Batou, Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex
          • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Saturday September 15 2018, @09:49AM (1 child)

            by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @09:49AM (#735246) Homepage Journal

            The satisfaction of knowing that you've done that trademarked "right thing"?

            --
            Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.
            • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @10:14AM

              by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @10:14AM (#735250)

              And let you with the trademarked "good things"?
              Sorry, no.

      • (Score: 2) by jasassin on Sunday September 16 2018, @09:11AM

        by jasassin (3566) <jasassin@gmail.com> on Sunday September 16 2018, @09:11AM (#735589) Journal

        Knowing that the hole is near the toilet, I reckon you still have a thing or two to tell her.

        I'm pretty sure she had a good idea what was going on after the penis slid out the hole.

        --
        jasassin@gmail.com Key fingerprint = 0644 173D 8EED AB73 C2A6 B363 8A70 579B B6A7 02CA
  • (Score: 1, Troll) by hemocyanin on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:12AM (5 children)

    by hemocyanin (186) on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:12AM (#735160) Journal

    Looks like the Russians are taking a page from the Democrat's #RussiaRussiaRussia playbook and doing a search and replace.

    • (Score: 2) by takyon on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:14AM (4 children)

      by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:14AM (#735161) Journal

      Pretty easy to do when America has imposed sanctions on your country, with plans to do more [reuters.com].

      --
      [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
      • (Score: 2) by c0lo on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:36AM

        by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:36AM (#735165) Journal
      • (Score: 2) by Runaway1956 on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:37AM (2 children)

        by Runaway1956 (2926) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:37AM (#735166) Homepage Journal

        Every time I read or hear about some joint US/Russian venture in space, I think about all that enmity on the ground. Crazy, isn't it? We want to cut Russia's throat, economically, but we depend on Russia to cooperate with us in space.

        --
        Our first six presidents were educated men. Then, along came a Democrat.
        • (Score: 5, Interesting) by takyon on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:57AM

          by takyon (881) <{takyon} {at} {soylentnews.org}> on Saturday September 15 2018, @12:57AM (#735171) Journal

          We could be seeing the end of U.S.-Russian cooperation in space.

          1. This crazy mess.
          2. U.S. is likely to suspend involvement with the ISS by 2025, maybe 2028.
          3. U.S. will (hopefully) have two companies capable of getting U.S. astronauts to the ISS by next year, ending dependence on the Russians.
          4. U.S. has its lame LOP-G as a destination for the SLS, which doesn't get the Russians to the actual [nextbigfuture.com] Moon [spaceflightinsider.com].
          5. China will open up [gbtimes.com] its low-Earth orbit space station to any interested nations. Except for the U.S., since NASA is prohibited from working with China by Congress.
          6. Russia's space program is in the [spaceflightinsider.com] shitter [independent.co.uk] anyway [defenseone.com].

          --
          [SIG] 10/28/2017: Soylent Upgrade v14 [soylentnews.org]
        • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Immerman on Saturday September 15 2018, @05:07AM

          by Immerman (3985) on Saturday September 15 2018, @05:07AM (#735209)

          I think a big part of it may genuinely have been a "Hey, let's cooperate where it absolutely doesn't matter to anyone but egghead astronomers". Sort of an escape valve to explore cooperation and try to defuse cold-war tensions someplace that had good P.R. potential with limited real consequence to either power. Not like corporate business ventures where stakeholders might hold your feet to the fire if you decided to renege.

          Sort of the brighter mirror-image of the long history of the U.S. R and D parties "Let's be loudly at odds over things our corporate sponsors could care less about, while quietly cooperating to sell out citizens"

  • (Score: 5, Informative) by c0lo on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:19AM

    by c0lo (156) Subscriber Badge on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:19AM (#735178) Journal

    Russian cosmonaut speaks about hole in the ISS and assures that all is well [firstpost.com]

    the cosmonaut, Sergei Prokopyev, posted a video [twitter.com] on Twitter where he shows the small sealed hole in the wall of a Russian-made Soyuz space capsule docked onto the ISS.

    Interesting: around the 1 minute mark of the video, the hole doesn't seem to be in a position that easy to reach from inside ISS, it is more likely it didn't happen in space.

    On the (literally) other side of the hole [tass.com]

    "Traces of drilling have been found not only inside the spacecraft’s living compartment, but also on the screen of the anti-meteorite shield that covers the spacecraft from the outside and is installed 15 millimeters away from the pressure hull," the source said.
    ...
    "During the analysis of those images, traces of drilling were found on the anti-meteorite shield," the source said, adding that "the top of the drill came through the pressure hull and hit the non-gastight outer shell."
    ...
    According to another industry source, the non-gastight anti-meteorite protection is installed right before the spacecraft is taken to the final assembly workshop.

    "When Soyuz MS-09 has just arrived to the final assembly workshop, it was photographed in details. No hole and no signs of drilling… were found. The spacecraft was drilled later, when it was fully assembled," the source said.

    He added that the anti-meteorite shield was also photographed before being installed, and no traces on it were found as well.

    As for the claim that Americans cosmonauts may have damaged the Soyuz deliberately???
    The russian officials are calling "Bullshit. Fake news" [tass.com]

    The recent buzz about the incident with Russia’s Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft, which is currently docked with the International Space Station (ISS), is directed at subverting the friendly relations among the international crew on board the orbital station, Russia’s State Space Corporation Roscosmos chief Dmitry Rogozin said.

    "The recent gossip and rumors circulating about the incident at the ISS hinder the work of Roscosmos experts and are designed to subvert the friendly relations among the crew members of the space station," Rogozin commented on his Facebook account.

    "All statements citing unnamed sources are inadmissible until Roscosmos special commission concludes its work," the CEO stressed.

    Russian Deputy Prime Minister Yury Borisov said earlier in the day that it was inadmissible to accuse either Russian or American ISS crewmembers of the incident since "it is a unified crew with no political disagreements whatsoever."

    --
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoFiw2jMy-0
  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:23AM (3 children)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:23AM (#735180)

    seems like drilling a hole would be pretty loud.

    Wouldn't everybody come running to see what was happening?

    This smells like a diversion, but from what?

    • (Score: 2) by Knowledge Troll on Saturday September 15 2018, @02:24PM (2 children)

      by Knowledge Troll (5948) on Saturday September 15 2018, @02:24PM (#735296) Homepage Journal

      I can't fathom how anyone could drill a hole in the space station with out everyone else in there knowing about it unless it was really really really slowly. Prison escape slow.

      I would expect the drill noise to travel along the entire structure.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @11:26PM

        by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @11:26PM (#735470)

        I imagine they have quite a few pumps and fans running at all times. A small drill at slow speed and a tiny bit is probably easy to do in under 5 mins.

      • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 16 2018, @12:34AM

        by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 16 2018, @12:34AM (#735493)

        The way it was first reported, the hole was plugged with some sealant that had come loose. At least in that news item, the assumption was the hole was drilled on the ground, plugged and the plug fell out recently.

  • (Score: 3, Insightful) by Revek on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:35AM (1 child)

    by Revek (5022) on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:35AM (#735183)

    American idiots in that they let themselves be trolled so easily and rush forward with a story without any real evidence.

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  • (Score: 4, Interesting) by fraxinus-tree on Saturday September 15 2018, @10:11AM

    by fraxinus-tree (5590) on Saturday September 15 2018, @10:11AM (#735248)

    This is impossible, never happened before and unlikely to happen anyway.

    Russians and people in (post-)soviet world in general are used not only to not trusting any official position. In a lot of cases, they also assume exactly the opposite to be true. So the government had to build a parallel rumor-based "network of the truth". The Internet trolls are not new and their methods are not developed in the internet age. They just adopted the new technology, still doing what they are good at, just scaled to the whole world. Their services are for sale, too.

    Good luck fighting them. Not impossible, just very, very hard.

  • (Score: 0) by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:08PM

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday September 15 2018, @01:08PM (#735279)

    -nt

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