Stories
Slash Boxes
Comments

SoylentNews is people

Log In

Log In

Create Account  |  Retrieve Password


Site News

Join our Folding@Home team:
Main F@H site
Our team page


Funding Goal
For 6-month period:
2018-07-01 to 2018-12-31
Estimated Base Goal: $3000.00
Progress So Far:
Approximately: $951.29
31.7%

Covers transactions:
2018-07-01 00:00:00 ..
2018-11-10 11:32:55 UTC
(SPIDs: [942..986])
Last Update:
2018-11-10 12:56:46 UTC
--martyb


Support us: Subscribe Here
and buy SoylentNews Swag


We always have a place for talented people, visit the Get Involved section on the wiki to see how you can make SoylentNews better.

What's the biggest monster this Halloween?

  • Lämp
  • Kanye West and Lil Pump in Roblox suits
  • The Orange One
  • The Haunted Robot Brothel in Your Town
  • Capitalism
  • Sexy "Handmaid's Tale" Oppression
  • SoylentNews editors
  • None of the above (comment your answer)

[ Results | Polls ]
Comments:69 | Votes:181

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @11:21PM   Printer-friendly
from the quite-a-'bit'-of-an-improvement dept.

https://www.folio.ca/u-of-a-physicists-develop-new-technique-to-create-quantum-memory/:

Physicists at the University of Alberta have developed a new way to build quantum memory that could help pave the way for a next-generation quantum internet that is more secure but can still take advantage of existing network technology like fibre-optic cables.

"We've developed a new way to store pulses of light—down to the single-photon level—in clouds of ultracold rubidium atoms, and to later retrieve them on demand by shining a 'control' pulse of light," said Lindsay LeBlanc, assistant professor of physics and Canada Research Chair in Ultracold Gases for Quantum Simulation. LeBlanc conducted the research with post-doctoral fellow Erhan Saglamyurek.

[...] The new method developed by LeBlanc and Saglamyurek, which is best suited for applications requiring high-speed operations, also has considerably fewer technical requirements than common quantum storage techniques.

[...] The discovery will allow for the crucial scaling up of quantum technologies, which has proven the biggest challenge to date in the emerging field. For example, Leblanc noted, because it can store data until it is needed, the new memory could be useful for transmitting data securely over longer distances.

[...] The study, "Coherent Storage and Manipulation of Broadband Photons Via Dynamically Controlled Autler-Townes Splitting," was published in Nature Photonics.


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @09:44PM   Printer-friendly
from the know-when-to-hold-'em,-know-when-to-fold-'em dept.

Google says Android will natively support 'foldables' to limit fragmentation

Google is officially announcing support for a category of Android devices it's decided to call "Foldables." Speaking today at the Android Developer Summit, VP of engineering Dave Burke said that Google is "enhancing Android to take advantage of this new form factor with as little work as necessary." But as of right now, those enhancements are mostly just guidance for developers to start using already-existing features that are built into Android.

If you haven't heard, devices with folding displays are about to become a thing. Today is the day when Samsung will stop teasing and start showing its phone with a folding display at its developer conference, which is happening at the same time as Google's summit. Google tells me that it's working closely with Samsung on how Android will develop foldables. But Google's focus is on making sure that it becomes a platform-level thing for Android that any OEM can use.

Samsung to Launch Foldable Phone in 2019

Samsung used its developer conference in San Francisco Wednesday to officially announce that it will launch a foldable smartphone some time in 2019. The phone is using the company's own new Infinity Flex display, which allows it to be folded and unfolded repeatedly without wear and tear.

"When it's open, it's a tablet, offering a big-screen experience," said Samsung vice president of mobile marketing Justin Denison. "When it's closed, it's a phone that fits neatly inside your pocket."

Denison showed off a phone featuring the new display technology on stage, which featured a 7.3-inch display when unfolded. However, the device itself was camouflaged to hide key design aspects. The company also didn't offer any branding for the new phone, and Denison didn't want to commit to a firm launch date, instead just saying that the company would begin mass production "in the coming months."

Also at Android Police.

Previously: Royole Beats Samsung and Others in Race to Create the First Foldable Smartphone


Original Submission

posted by takyon on Wednesday November 07, @08:07PM   Printer-friendly
from the cool-brother dept.

Tencent this week unveiled its answer to the video-recording sunglasses, which, you'll notice, bear a striking resemblance to Snap's Spectacles.

Called the Weishi smartglasses, Tencent's wearable camera sports a lens in the front corner that allows users to film from a first-person perspective. Thankfully, the Chinese gaming and social giant has not made the mistake of Snap's first-generation Spectacles, which highlighted the camera with a conspicuous yellow ring.

[...] The purpose behind Tencent's new gadget is implicit in its name. Weishi, which means "micro videos" in Chinese, is also the name of the short-video sharing app that Tencent has been aggressively promoting in recent months to catch up with market dominators TikTok and Kuaishou.

(source: TechCrunch)

Related: Snapchat Takes a Second Shot at Wearable Camera "Spectacles"
Snap Gives Spectacles a Face Lift to Look More Like Traditional Sunglasses
Instagram "Influencer" Sued for $90,000 for Not Sufficiently Sporting Snapchat's Spectacles


Original Submission

posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday November 07, @06:04PM   Printer-friendly
from the there's-ice-cream dept.

Submitted via IRC for Bytram

Seven in 8 children's tonsillectomies are unnecessary

Researchers analysed the electronic medical records of over 1.6 million children from more than 700 UK general practices dating between 2005 and 2016. They found that out of 18,271 children who had their tonsils removed during this time, only 2,144 (11.7 per cent) had enough sore throats to justify surgery.

The researchers at the University's Institute of Applied Health Research concluded that their evidence, published today (Nov 6th) in British Journal of General Practice, showed that annually 32,500 children undergo needless tonsillectomies at a cost to the NHS of £36.9 million.

What's more, they found that many children who might benefit from having their tonsils removed are not having the surgical procedure. They found that of 15,764 children who had records showing sufficient sore throats to undergo a tonsillectomy, just 2,144 (13.6 per cent) actually went on to have one.

[...] Tom Marshall, Professor or Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Birmingham, said: "Research shows that children with frequent sore throats usually suffer fewer sore throats over the next year or two. In those children with enough documented sore throats, the improvement is slightly quicker after tonsillectomy, which means surgery is justified.

"But research suggests children with fewer sore throats don't benefit enough to justify surgery, because the sore throats tend to go away anyway.

"Our research showed that most children who had their tonsils removed weren't severely enough affected to justify treatment, while on the other hand, most children who were severely enough affected with frequent sore throats did not have their tonsils removed. The pattern changed little over the 12 year period.

"Children may be more harmed than helped by a tonsillectomy. We found that even among severely affected children only a tiny minority of ever have their tonsils out. It makes you wonder if tonsillectomy ever really essential in any child."

Incidence of indications for tonsillectomy and frequency of evidence-based surgery: a 12-year retrospective cohort study of primary care electronic records (DOI 10.3399/bjgp18X699833$)


Original Submission

posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday November 07, @04:32PM   Printer-friendly
from the alarming-statistics dept.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-46096626

In the fiscal year 2016/7 up to March, 250 children from elementary to high school age were recorded as having taken their own lives. The number is five more than last year, and the highest it has been since 1986.

Concerns the children had reported included family problems, worrying about their futures and bullying. But schools said the reasons behind about 140 of the deaths are unknown as the students did not leave a note. Most of those who took their lives were of high school age, where Japanese students typically study until they are aged 18.

[...] Overall suicides across Japan fell to about 21,000 in 2017, police say, down from a peak of about 34,500 in 2003.

[...] "The number of suicides of students have stayed high, and that is an alarming issue which should be tackled," education ministry official Noriaki Kitazaki said as the latest figures were released.


Original Submission

posted by NCommander on Wednesday November 07, @03:00PM   Printer-friendly
from the maybe-we-can-buy-.soylentnews-gTLD dept.

Disclaimer: This post does not reflect the views or policies of SoylentNews Public Benefit Corporation (SN PBC), its staff, or my role as president. The opinions and statements within are my own, Michael Casadevall, and neither I nor SN PBC were financially compensated for this post.

There are times in life where you simply don't know where you will end up. For me, a chance encounter in Puerto Rico lead to a rather interesting series of events. I have spent the previous week (October 20th-26th) attending the ICANN 63rd International Public Meeting. For those who aren't familiar with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), it is essentially the not-for-profit organization that administrates the Internet root zone which forms the linchpin of the modern internet, and allows domain names such as soylentnews.org to exist.

As a fellow, I have been working to help advance policy from the perspective of Internet end-users, as well as improving access to the Internet in the form of Internationalized Domain Names. For those less familiar with the technical underpinnings of the Internet, I'll also talk a bit about DNS, and more of the work I am currently in the process of handling at ICANN.

In This Issue

  • DNS - What is it?
  • The Internet Root Zone, Top Level Domains, and Second Level Domains
  • What Is ICANN?
  • The Fellowship Program
  • New Generic Top Level Domains
  • String Contention and Name Collisions
  • Internationalized Domain Names
  • In Closing
  • If You Want To Get Involved
  • Acknowledgements

Read more past the fold ...

DNS - What is it?

Before we can talk about ICANN in any fashion, we need to talk a bit about the Domain Name System, or DNS. Every computer on the internet is assigned one or more numbers known as IP addresses. IP addresses take the form of 23.239.29.31 or 2600:3c00::f03c:91ff:fe98:90b, and are used as ways of uniquely identifying every device. Every site and service has an IP address, as does your phone and computer to allow two way communication; they can be best thought of telephone numbers for computers.

Just like phone numbers, there needs to be a method to look up information based on name. In the days of old, we would use the Yellow Pages for this type of information. For computers, our version of the yellow pages is DNS, specifically what we call A and AAAA records. For example, here are two types of lookup requests for SoylentNews:

$ nslookup
> server 8.8.8.8
Default server: 8.8.8.8
Address: 8.8.8.8#53
> soylentnews.org
Server:		8.8.8.8
Address:	8.8.8.8#53

Non-authoritative answer:
Name:	soylentnews.org
Address: 23.239.29.31
Name:	soylentnews.org
Address: 2600:3c00::f03c:91ff:fe98:90b

Besides basic name lookup information, DNS often contains information such as mail routing in the form of MX records, or even user authentication data in the form of Hesiod TXT records. It would be fair to call DNS the worlds largest distributed dynamic database. At its core, DNS is comprised of a network of worldwide servers that provide name lookup services from the internet, starting from the root of a tree.

The Internet Root Zone, Top Level Domains, and Second Level Domains

When I said root of a tree, I wasn't being very metaphorical. Let's look a little closer at an actual domain name, and break it down into its component parts, in this case, our development site at dev.soylentnews.org. For the purposes of demonstration, we'll walk the domain from the top down. Each section of a domain name is divided into levels separated by a period. So dev is a third level domain, soylentnews is a second level domain, and org is a top level domain.

Likewise, each of these levels points to the one higher than it. Let's ask the soylentnews domain about dev; our hosting provider (and DNS servers) are hosted by Linode so we'll query them directly.

$ nslookup
> server ns1.linode.com
Default server: ns1.linode.com
Address: 2400:cb00:2049:1::a29f:1a63#53
Default server: ns1.linode.com
Address: 162.159.27.72#53
> dev.soylentnews.org
Server:		ns1.linode.com
Address:	2400:cb00:2049:1::a29f:1a63#53

Name:	dev.soylentnews.org
Address: 72.14.185.204
Name:	dev.soylentnews.org
Address: 2600:3c00::f03c:91ff:fe6e:d0a3

Notice that the "Non-authoritative answer" is missing. This is because soylentnews.org directly controls the level above it. We can see the same effect if we query the .org nameservers for SoylentNews; note that we need to ask for the NS record type which acts as a pointer to the next level of domain.

$ nslookup
> server a0.org.afilias-nst.info.
[...]
> set type=ns
> soylentnews.org
[...]
Authoritative answers can be found from:
soylentnews.org	nameserver = ns1.linode.com.
soylentnews.org	nameserver = ns3.linode.com.
soylentnews.org	nameserver = ns2.linode.com.
soylentnews.org	nameserver = ns4.linode.com.
soylentnews.org	nameserver = ns5.linode.com.

Cool! We can see the five nameservers that have authoritative data for soylentnews.org. But how did I find the nameserver for .org? Well, I queried the internet root zone for it.

nslookup
> server a.root-servers.net
Default server: a.root-servers.net
Address: 2001:503:ba3e::2:30#53
Default server: a.root-servers.net
Address: 198.41.0.4#53
> set type=ns
> org
Server:		a.root-servers.net
Address:	2001:503:ba3e::2:30#53

Non-authoritative answer:
*** Can't find org: No answer

Authoritative answers can be found from:
org	nameserver = a0.org.afilias-nst.info.
org	nameserver = a2.org.afilias-nst.info.
org	nameserver = b0.org.afilias-nst.org.
org	nameserver = b2.org.afilias-nst.org.
org	nameserver = c0.org.afilias-nst.info.
org	nameserver = d0.org.afilias-nst.org.
a0.org.afilias-nst.info	internet address = 199.19.56.1
a2.org.afilias-nst.info	internet address = 199.249.112.1
b0.org.afilias-nst.org	internet address = 199.19.54.1
b2.org.afilias-nst.org	internet address = 199.249.120.1
c0.org.afilias-nst.info	internet address = 199.19.53.1
d0.org.afilias-nst.org	internet address = 199.19.57.1
a0.org.afilias-nst.info	has AAAA address 2001:500:e::1
a2.org.afilias-nst.info	has AAAA address 2001:500:40::1
b0.org.afilias-nst.org	has AAAA address 2001:500:c::1
b2.org.afilias-nst.org	has AAAA address 2001:500:48::1
c0.org.afilias-nst.info	has AAAA address 2001:500:b::1
d0.org.afilias-nst.org	has AAAA address 2001:500:f::1

The root zone contains all information on all the top level domains, as well as the special KSK (Key Signing Keys) keys that underpin the DNSSEC system. In domain names, the root zone is represented as a final '.' at the end of the domain which is typically implied although there are rare technical reasons where it has to be referred to directly. Now that we've discussed and slightly explored the root zone, let's talk about the organization that administrates it, and the policy and rules related to the root, and the top-level domains referenced within.

What is ICANN?

The full history of ICANN is too long to recap here, but in short, ICANN is a multi-stakeholder community that represents various stakeholder groups and their interests and needs. In no specific order, these groups are as follows:

  • GAC - Government Advisory Committee
  • SSAC - Security and Stability Advisory Committee
  • RSSAC - Root Server System Advisory Committee
  • GNSO - Generic Names Supporting Organization
  • ccNSO - Country Code Names Supporting Organization
  • CSG - Commercial Stakeholder Group
  • ASO - Address Supporting Organization
  • At-Large/ALAC - At Large Advisory Community (Internet Endusers)

That's a LOT of acronyms, groups, and organizations, and this isn't even a complete list. Each of these groups (known as stakeholders) are essentially cross-sections of all internet users and work to drive policy that meet the goals of their interests and charters. Other groups primarily act in an advisory role such as SSAC in evaluating impact of policy changes to the ICANN board. ICANN stakeholder groups create working groups (many of which are open to the public) to accomplish goals and draft policy, respond to public policy comments, and create a final report. These are then followed by implementation.

As you can plainly see, ICANN is a massive multi-headed hydra that at first is not the most user-friendly beast to approach. At least from my perspective, getting involved was rather difficult. For this purpose, ICANN offers two programs to help get people involved: a fellowship program to bring both those with diversity or unique skills in and the NextGen program. I can't speak on NextGen, but I can speak to the fellowship program, and my personal story in how I both got involved and the topics and work I was involved in at ICANN63.

ICANN Fellowship Program

To talk about my experience as a fellow, we need to go back to February 2018 when I was in San Juan, Puerto Rico, visiting with a friend. While I was there, I saw large banners with the ICANN name and logo and some sort of conference. While I did not know the specifics at the time, what I was seeing was the ICANN61 General Policy Forum. As such, I walked in off the street, registered for a badge, and sat down at a high level meeting regarding an issue known as name collision hosted by the SSAC. This, and a few other meetings convinced me that becoming involved with ICANN was something I was personally interested in.

Unfortunately, getting your foot in the door with ICANN from the outside is something of a tall order. To help solve this problem, ICANN offers a fellowship program to help bring both diversity and talent within the community. As such, I was selected to attend ICANN63 on the basis of my position as an independent freelancer combined with strong technical skills. The fellowship program, currently managed by Siranush Vardanyan, is meant to help bring people into the ICANN community and guide them into position and niches where their skillsets can help. Many within ICANN bring technical, legal, policy, and activism talents to the table, and it is an extremely inclusive community to say the least. As was oft-repeated, 'Once a fellow, always a fellow'. Through the fellowship program, I was assigned a coach, Alfredo Calderon who helped me get involved with the gTLD working groups, and help decode the maze that I described above.

The intent of the fellowship is to prepare those to attend a face-to-face meeting (in this case, ICANN63), and help the fellow become active within the ICANN community. In my case, I managed to hit the ground running as in the intervening months between ICANN61 and 63, I had gotten involved with the Internet Society, and several working groups within the IETF (albeit it on a semi-active basis). That combined with closely following the news allowed me to be productive from the start. What follows are issues that I was primarily involved with — it doesn't cover some of the larger discussions such as the GDPR/WHOIS policy development sessions.

New Generic Top Level Domains (gTLD)

Generic top level domains are generally the most common type of TLD most people encounter, comprising .com, .net, .org, etc. compared to the two letter country code TLDs (ccTLDs) such as .us or .io. Back in 2005, ICANN began developing policies to allow for the creation of new gTLDs, and in 2013, these new gTLDs began being added to the root zone as part of the New gTLD Program. Since the initial land rush and additions, ICANN has been developing new rules relating to this process in the form of the New gTLD Subsequent Procedures PDP (Policy Development Process) working group (known as the SubPro), which I'm a member of. I've primarily worked to ensure that not for profit and smaller communities can't be outbid or driven out of the process of obtaining their own gTLDs.

Expansion of the generic TLDs help relieve strain on the already crowded .com/.org/.net registries and pave the way for full internationalization of the internet (a topic I'll cover below). While there have those who've felt that expanding gTLDs was a mistake, the ability to have domains such as .nyc for sites relating to New York City has shown that the new gTLD program has real world benefits that we're already experiencing today. However, creating and expanding gTLDs also has opened a paradox's box of sorts which involves the SubPro, specifically in the the realm of string contention and name collisions.

String Contention and Name Collisions

In a perfect world, everyone would have one unique name and registering a new gTLD would be an easy and straightforward process. Unfortunately, we don't live in that sort of world; we live in a world where the Government of Brazil, and Amazon both want the .amazon TLD. This is what's known as a string contention; when multiple parties want the same domain string, and part of my work within the SubPro is building and designing mechanisms for handling contentions, as well as a last resort process which is fair for all parties. In the last round of gTLD additions, many string contentions were solved either by private party, or through a last resort auction process. At the direction of the ICANN board, the SubPro has been reviewing the results of this last round, ensuring that all actors, especially smaller community-based ones have an equal chance of being given a gTLD, and making sure no one can be strong-armed out of the process. I (and others within the SubPro) have been working on creating and streamlining the new gTLD process, and making sure that no single party can monopolize a string by simply outspending everyone. Of course, social issues aren't the only hangup when creating a new top-level domain; you can have a name collision.

Name collisions are a closely related problem dealing with the technical issues of what happens when you add a name to the root zone that's already in use in other contexts. For example, the Tor network could be entirely shafted if .onion was added to the root zone as it's used as a pseudo-TLD. Unfortunately, because of literally decades of bad practice, poor device coding, and similar historical artifacts, it means that the root zones get thousands of requests per second for bogus top level domains. As part of adding any new TLD, a review is done to determine the technical impact — research by SSAC into the name collision issue as a whole is ongoing. While I'm not personally involved in this work as of yet, I am interested in joining it in the near future

Internationalized Domain Names (IDN)

Last, but not least, the final major activity I worked on was discussions related to the internationalization of domain names, and email address internationalization (EAI) with the goal of making ensuring the web is available for everyone. Due to the fact that DNS was designed in 1987, it was never designed with internationalization in mind and has required some arcane hacks to make it work. Let's take the string тест which is Russian for test; it displays properly because we support UTF-8. However, DNS was never designed to work with 8-bit characters. Instead, a system was created known as punycode. This system represents unicode in ASCII in a method that DNS can handle; so the domain тест.example becomes xn--e1aybc.example which can be handled by existing tools.

This however creates a disconnect between the displayed name (known as the U-label) and the ASCII representation (A-label) of a domain name, which is known to break software that either renders domain names, or in the cases of email, must amend information to its log files. It also leads to issues with SSL certificates, and other confusion within the ecosystem due to poor support. While IDNs have been around for awhile, new codepoints including right-to-left ones are being added that require more testing and development. I've started one of two projects to help study and test IDNs, and an active participant of the Universal Acceptance mailing lists on the subject.

dnscatcher and idn-root-zone

As part of the meetings and other work, I've started work on two projects to help raise awareness and study ongoing problems with the world of DNS by creating tools to help monitor the health of the ecosystem as a whole. The first of these is a project that I'm tentatively calling DNS Catcher, and its intent is to study the perspective of the domain name system from the viewpoint of the end user.

As we know from study from data related to authoritative name servers, and the root zone, a lot of recursive revolvers and end-user devices send bogus data, such as catching all missing domains with a wildcard, or sending bogus requests to the root. DNS Catcher is an attempt to quantify the problem from the last mile and understand what data devices are sending out. While it's still in very early proof of concept, the catcher's end goal is to compare known good authorize zone data to data collected from various locations such as public access points and more so as to identify bad actors within the DNS community. It's still in the early pre-alpha stage, but my initial coding efforts have left me optimistic I may have an alpha version ready to go by the end of the year which will be subject to its own blog post.

The other is what I'm calling tentatively calling Root Zone in a Box, a series of shell scripts, instructions and docker containers to automatically recreate a simulation of the DNS root zone, and other core internet functionality to allow testing of potential changes to DNS, as well as help study and debug various issues related to Internationalized Domain Names. Compared to dnscatacher, I've gotten further on this project as it's somewhat higher priority. While likely not of interest to most as of yet, RZiaB is basically designed to help validate and ensure that internationalized domain names and email address internationalization works smoothly and that issues can be quickly identified and fixed using an easy-to-host environment that can be quickly set up.

I'll likely talk more of these projects in separate posts at later dates, but I invite people to comment and review my work.

Other Odds and Ends

As with any conference, there was various interesting conversations, discussions, and round tables that you really don't experience in a purely electronic environment. One of these (which was the direct inspiration for DNS catcher) was discussing why some devices send bogus data (in the form of random hex strings) to the internet root zone. I postulated that the answer was it was the one more-or-less sure fire way to know if you have anyone tampering with your DNS data such as captive portals, restrictive firewalls, or ISPs who don't like to return NXDomain.

Another big part are social dinners and gatherings. One personal highlight is I also had a fairly decent conversation with the appointed representative to the GAC from the Holy See, dealing with domain name issues relating to the Vatican. We primarily talked about working at the Vatican, the papacy's interest in ICANN, and life within the city. As far as unique individuals go, this easily makes a spot on my top ten list!

In Closing

Although my time in Barcelona has come to an end, my involvement within ICANN is higher than ever. We're doing strong work to try and keep the internet open and accessible to all, and we're always looking for anyone with an interest to get involved. The Fellowship experience helped me connect with individuals that let me reach my personal goals of working on the SubPro, as well as connected me to the IDN working group folks in a way that I hope to pave a new cornerstone of the internet for non-English speaking individuals. There's a lot of work ahead, but I can say with certainty that my work with ICANN will continue, and I look forward to what the future will hold. If you're interested in my projects, comment below, or follow me on Twitter: @fossfirefighter where I post about my work on DNS catcher, RZiaB, and other things that don't make SoylentNews... like a retroBBS hacking project.

If You Want To Get Involved

If what you've read interests you, and you want to get involved in ICANN yourself, a good starting place is the alac-announce mailing list which posts which working groups are in progress, have meetings, and other good information, as well as joining your regional At-Large community. Most working groups (WGs) don't require membership in a stakeholder group, so you can just dive in; you're simply expected to familiarize yourself with the WG's previous history up to that point for the most part. There is also a set of learning resources at learn.icann.org, and I'm happy to take questions here or on Twitter.

Acknowledgements

Before signing off, I want to personally thank several individuals who helped me get here. First, Alfredo Calderon, my ICANN coach and Siranush Vardanyan, manager of the fellowship program. Both were very understanding and helpful with some personal difficulties I ran into during the fellowship program and both of them contributed greatly to a successful face-to-face meeting. Next, I'd like to thank Martin Pablo Silva, who continuously encouraged me to apply for the Fellowship, and helped make sure my application was in tip-top shape, and last, but not least, Dina Solveig Jalkanen (who prefers to go by Thomas), who introduced me to ICANN and is a close personal friend and who is was instrumental in making this possible.

Until the next time ...

73 de NCommander

posted by Fnord666 on Wednesday November 07, @02:23PM   Printer-friendly
from the believe-it-when-you-see-it dept.

https://www.engadget.com/2018/11/06/fcc-caller-id-authentication-2019/

Even if you don't agree with Ajit Pai's stance on some important issues, you might still want to hear about his latest campaign against robocalls. The FCC chairman has demanded (PDF) the adoption of a robust call authentication system to prevent caller ID spoofing, telling American carriers to implement the technology no later than 2019. Pai has sent letters to the CEOs of 14 voice providers to ask them to conjure up concrete plans to adopt the SHAKEN/STIR framework, which would validate legitimate calls across networks before they reach recipients. That would block spam and scam robocalls from going through, so you don't have to be wary of answering calls anymore.

"Combatting illegal robocalls is our top consumer priority at the FCC. That's why we need call authentication to become a reality -- it's the best way to ensure that consumers can answer their phones with confidence. By this time next year, I expect that consumers will begin to see this on their phones," Pai said in a statement.

He asked the carriers about their implementation plans and warned that if it doesn't seem like the call authentication system is on track to get up and running by 2019, the FCC will take action. Pai didn't elaborate on what the FCC will do, but the agency says it "stands ready to ensure widespread deployment to hit this important technological milestone."


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @12:51PM   Printer-friendly
from the Freedom-of-the-press dept.

https://gab.ai/news/2958

Why Epik welcomed Gab.com
This post will summarize why Epik welcomed Gab.com. It will also address why I believe the operators of the site have the right to be online.
epik.com

So, who the heck is Epik? Never heard of them.

https://gab.ai/news/2957

After GoDaddy cut ties following Pittsburgh shooting, Gab back online thanks to Seattle startup
A Seattle startup has inked a deal to host domain registrar services for Gab.com, the site that was dropped by GoDaddy and other companies in the wake of the Pittsburgh synagogue shooting.
www.geekwire.com

The story is here: https://epik.com/blog/why-epik-welcomed-gab-com.html

Let Freedom Ring

To the casual observer, the case of Gab.com seems like it is something new. It is not. It is history repeating itself. While there are consequences to actions, there is also the proverbial risk of throwing out the baby with the bathwater. My hope, for all of our sakes, is that Gab.com treads wisely, using its liberty for the betterment of most, and the enlightenment of all.

Sincerely,
Robert W. Monster
Founder and CEO
Epik.com

November 3, 2018
   

Maybe it's my browser configuration, but gab.ai doesn't seem to be working, completely. But, they haven't gone away. The pages that load are filled with bitterness, and maybe even some hate speech, if you're into that sort of vilification. Still don't know diddly about Robert Monster, but maybe he's a "good guy".

Previously: Social Media and the Pittsburgh Shooter: Gab.com Going Down
Gab's Plan To Use Blockchain To Make Itself Indestructible


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @11:14AM   Printer-friendly
from the I'm-not-saying-it-was-aliens dept.

Two Harvard astronomers have suggested that the interstellar object that passed through our solar system in late 2017 and early 2018 could have been part of an alien spacecraft.

Shmuel Bialy and Abraham Loeb, two astronomers from the Harvard Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, suggested the cigar-shaped object — given the Hawaiian name 'Oumuamua, which NASA notes "means a messenger from afar arriving first" — could have been a discarded light sail of extra-terrestrial origin, perhaps sent here on purpose.

From the paper:

We explain the excess acceleration of `Oumuamua away from the sun as the result of the force that the sunlight exerts on its surface. For this force to explain measured excess acceleration, the object needs to be extremely thin, of order a fraction of a millimeter in thickness but tens of meters in size. This makes the object lightweight for its surface area and allows it to act as a light-sail. Its origin could be either natural (in the interstellar medium or proto-planetary disks) or artificial (as a probe sent for a reconnaissance mission into the inner region of the solar system)."

It's not hard to find plenty of the usual skepticism, much of which seems to center on whether or not the object outgassed on the way into our solar system, and it's shape. The gist of the Harvard paper seems to be that the object would need to be extremely thin and not at all like the rocky artists rendering that has commonly been used in stories to date.

What do Soylentils think of this latest twist?


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @09:37AM   Printer-friendly
from the who's-da-boss? dept.

France's Macron Calls for Creating a 'European Army'

French President Emmanuel Macron called for the creation of a "true European army," issuing a sharp critique of trans-Atlantic security ties days before U.S. President Trump is due to visit France.

Europe's security ties with the U.S., which have been a bedrock of the continent's stability for decades, have come under strain as Mr. Trump has demanded more military spending from European members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and questioned the alliance's benefits for the U.S. Such tensions have led Mr. Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel to publicly question whether the continent can still rely on the U.S. to come to Europe's defense.

Mr. Macron went a step further by grouping the U.S. among foreign powers he considers a potential threat to the continent. "We have to protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America," Mr. Macron said on French radio.

Mr. Macron made the remarks as part of a weeklong tour of World War I battlefields ahead of the centenary of the Nov. 11 Armistice, when the French leader is due to host Mr. Trump, Vladimir Putin of Russia and many other heads of state.

Also at Newsweek.

Emmanuel Macron: Six held in 'attack' plot against French president

Six people have been arrested in France on suspicion of planning to carry out a "violent" attack on President Emmanuel Macron, officials say. The individuals, reported to be five men and a woman, were picked up by the French security services in Brittany, north-east and south-east France.

An investigation is now taking place into a "criminal terrorist association", a judicial source said. Details of the suspects and the alleged plot have not yet been released.


Original Submission

posted by mrpg on Wednesday November 07, @08:00AM   Printer-friendly
from the next-a-usb-port dept.

NPR:

In Sweden, a country rich with technological advancement, thousands have had microchips inserted into their hands.

The chips are designed to speed up users' daily routines and make their lives more convenient — accessing their homes, offices and gyms is as easy as swiping their hands against digital readers.

They also can be used to store emergency contact details, social media profiles or e-tickets for events and rail journeys within Sweden.

Would you place the implant in your thumb, pointer finger, or middle finger?


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @06:27AM   Printer-friendly
from the big-things-in-small-packages dept.

Seagate HAMRs out a roadmap for future hard drive recording tech

Seagate has set a course to deliver a 48TB disk drive in 2023 using its HAMR (heat-assisted magnetic recording) technology, doubling areal density every 30 months, meaning 100TB could be possible by 2025/26.

[...] Seagate will introduce its first HAMR drives in 2020. The chart [here], from an A3 Tech Live event in London, shows Seagate started developing its HAMR tech in 2016 and that a 20TB+ drive will be rolled out in 2020.

The last PMR drive appears in 2019/20 with 16TB capacity. Seagate's current highest-capacity drive is a 14TB Exos 3.5-inch product.

There is a forecast of areal density doubling every 2.5 years, and Seagate shows two other HAMR drive capacity points: 36TB in 2021/22 and 48TB in 2023/24. Capacity goes on increasing beyond 2025, with 100TB looking likely.

The firm makes the point that HAMR drives will be drop-in replacements for current PMR drives. Seagate will actually develop performance-optimised HAMR drives with MACH.2 multi-actuator technology – two read/write heads per platter – and capacity-optimised drives with shingled magnetic recording (SMR). These are shown in a [second chart].

Previously: AnandTech Interview With Seagate's CTO: New HDD Technologies Coming
Seagate HAMR Hard Drives Coming in a Year and a Half
Western Digital to Use Microwave Assisted Magnetic Recording to Produce 40 TB HDDs by 2025
Seagate to Stay the Course With HAMR HDDs, Plans 20 TB by 2020, ~50 TB Before 2025


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @04:49AM   Printer-friendly
from the moah-powah dept.

AMD has announced the next generation of its Epyc server processors, with up to 64 cores (128 threads) each. Instead of an 8-core "core complex" (CCX), AMD's 64-core chips will feature 8 "chiplets" with 8 cores each:

AMD on Tuesday formally announced its next-generation EPYC processor code-named Rome. The new server CPU will feature up to 64 cores featuring the Zen 2 microarchitecture, thus providing at least two times higher performance per socket than existing EPYC chips.

As discussed in a separate story covering AMD's new 'chiplet' design approach, AMD EPYC 'Rome' processor will carry multiple CPU chiplets manufactured using TSMC's 7 nm fabrication process as well as an I/O die produced at a 14 nm node. As it appears, high-performance 'Rome' processors will use eight CPU chiplets offering 64 x86 cores in total.

Why chiplets?

Separating CPU chiplets from the I/O die has its advantages because it enables AMD to make the CPU chiplets smaller as physical interfaces (such as DRAM and Infinity Fabric) do not scale that well with shrinks of process technology. Therefore, instead of making CPU chiplets bigger and more expensive to manufacture, AMD decided to incorporate DRAM and some other I/O into a separate chip. Besides lower costs, the added benefit that AMD is going to enjoy with its 7 nm chiplets is ability to easier[sic] bin new chips for needed clocks and power, which is something that is hard to estimate in case of servers.

AMD also announced that Zen 4 is under development. It could be made on a "5nm" node, although that is speculation. The Zen 3 microarchitecture will be made on TSMC's N7+ process ("7nm" with more extensive use of extreme ultraviolet lithography).

AMD's Epyc CPUs will now be offered on Amazon Web Services.

AnandTech live blog of New Horizon event.

Previously: AMD Epyc 7000-Series Launched With Up to 32 Cores
TSMC Will Make AMD's "7nm" Epyc Server CPUs
Intel Announces 48-core Xeons Using Multiple Dies, Ahead of AMD Announcement

Related: Cray CS500 Supercomputers to Include AMD's Epyc as a Processor Option
Oracle Offers Servers with AMD's Epyc to its Cloud Customers


Original Submission

posted by martyb on Wednesday November 07, @03:12AM   Printer-friendly
from the BAD-design-(Broken-As-Designed) dept.

In June 2012, an owner of a Samsung Galaxy Nexus running Android 4.0.2 opened a case in Google's Issue Tracker requesting support for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6, otherwise known as DHCPv6, or RFC 3315, which allows for stateful address and connection configuration on devices joining an IPv6 network. DHCPv6, like DHCPv4, is commonly used in enterprise networks for connecting devices.

For the last six years — including through five new major versions of Android — that request has languished, when this week it was marked as "Won't Fix (Intended Behavior)" by Google engineer Lorenzo Colitti. Android is effectively the only platform which lacks support for DHCPv6, making the IPv6 implementation on Android incomplete.

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/androids-lack-of-dhcpv6-support-frustrates-enterprise-network-admins/


Original Submission

posted by chromas on Wednesday November 07, @01:35AM   Printer-friendly
from the build-a-phone-workshop dept.

Phys.org:

Taiwan-based electronics manufacturer Foxconn is struggling to find enough skilled workers for its planned facility in Wisconsin and may bring in personnel from China, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

The report said Foxconn, which makes devices and components for Apple and other tech firms, is facing a tight labor market for the manufacturing plant, which is getting some $3 billion in incentives from the midwestern state.

The company has pledged to hire 13,000 workers at the southern Wisconsin site, but some reports say the total may be lower as Foxconn scales back its initial plans.

They should offer American workers more festive suicide nets.


Original Submission

posted by takyon on Wednesday November 07, @12:11AM   Printer-friendly
from the do-the-wave dept.

United States elections, 2018

Maine's ranked-choice voting will be used in a federal general election for the first time, after previously using it in the primary system.

Live coverage at FiveThirtyEight, CNN, NBC, WSJ, Fox, CBSN (video), and Ballotpedia.

2018 Ballot measures

Update: Democrats have taken the House of Representatives, while Republicans have retained control of the Senate.

Georgia's Brian Kemp Opens 'Cyber Crimes' Investigation Into State Democrats, 2 Days Before Election

Georgia Secretary of State and Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp opened an investigation into the state's Democratic Party Sunday, alleging a failed attempt to hack the Georgia voter registration system.

Previously: Exact Match Requirements Eased in Georgia Ahead of Midterms


Original Submission